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Thread: Prey

  1. #11

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    Nope. Even if the code was portable, the company still needs to expel resources to get the code ported. Every minute burned on trying to get a Linux port out is money used, I think companies won't necessarily do the math and risk the Linux market for a consumer base of '?'.

    And posting requests on forums surely makes your voice heard, it doesn't make you representative of the "demand". That is done by a company's own case study.

    If you disagree, then that's fine. We'll just agree to disagree.

  2. #12
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    Jun 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by niniendowarrior
    Nope. Even if the code was portable, the company still needs to expel resources to get the code ported. Every minute burned on trying to get a Linux port out is money used, I think companies won't necessarily do the math and risk the Linux market for a consumer base of '?'.

    And posting requests on forums surely makes your voice heard, it doesn't make you representative of the "demand". That is done by a company's own case study.

    If you disagree, then that's fine. We'll just agree to disagree.
    Okay, so we have different definitions of the term "portable". I can't say I disagree entirely. No need to repeat myself again - I *know* why there will be no Prey linux client.

  3. #13

  4. #14
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    as usual Linux is a great working horse when it comes to the server part (more servers = more clients buying the game, right ?) but not on the client side. icculus said in an podcast interview that most of the game logic is actually the same on the server side as on the client side, not to mention that the Doom3 game engine already is portable, somehow most of the linux gamers thought that would mean a linux client would be a piece of cake.

    seeing that Linux doesn't have a big gamer base. I honestly think going to their forums, whinning and yapping about the lack of Linux support doesn't help anything, much less, irritate the company.
    so maybe everybody with an opinion should just shut up, just because you dont think it's a good way?

    how do you you think this matter should be treated ?

    And the way the company sees it, Linux gaming is a niche market that doesn't generate revenues to them. So, the cost of making sure a Linux port works is not compensated by the potential revenue that can be tapped from the Linux gaming community. Demand just isn't there.
    this is actually the problem: "they dont make Linux games because there is no gamer base, there is no gamer base 'cause there are no games made for Linux. " do you see the vicious circle? iD, EPIC/ Bioware tried to break it, other companies too, just look at SeriousSam2, Savage2.


    And posting requests on forums surely makes your voice heard, it doesn't make you representative of the "demand". That is done by a company's own case study.
    so where do companies research the gamer bases, if not on gamer forums/communities, if not on the internet?

  5. #15
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    Jun 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael
    I had no idea icculus was involved.

  6. #16

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    The Prey Linux Dedicated Server for version 1.1 is over @ Icculus' site

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadewalker View Post
    They started out with a very portable codebase (see Doom3, Quake4) and no doubt screwed it over completely, but as they're too ashamed to admit this fact, they cover themselves up with lies such as insufficient demand for a linux port.
    I doubt it's lies, per se, or that they've broken the engine completely.
    It's very probably more to do with total unfamiliarity with the OS-
    realize that Ryan did the server port for 'em- this sort of thing really
    isn't that hard unless you're afraid/unsure of the platform because it's
    "different". (And, I know this to be the case because I do it all the
    time, whether it's for games or other applications. What's funny is
    that they hired this out to Ryan- and they could have had local talent
    do it for them in-office for probably less than they paid him to do
    it with a bribe to allow me to port it to Linux or get LGP a cheap
    shot at it with me doing the work for 'em... Oh, well... )

    Remember that most game developers are dealing with Windows or some
    proprietary embedded thing that was inflicted upon them via the console
    players- Linux is an utterly alien concept to many of them if they don't
    use the OS themselves. Considering that two of the three next-gen
    consoles use Linux at their hearts, perhaps this story will change some.
    There'd be less of a reason/excuse at that point other than publishers
    not wanting to muck with the Linux desktop space. Even that can be
    dealt with over time.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by niniendowarrior View Post
    Nope. Even if the code was portable, the company still needs to expel resources to get the code ported. Every minute burned on trying to get a Linux port out is money used, I think companies won't necessarily do the math and risk the Linux market for a consumer base of '?'.

    And posting requests on forums surely makes your voice heard, it doesn't make you representative of the "demand". That is done by a company's own case study.

    If you disagree, then that's fine. We'll just agree to disagree.
    Heh... Depends on whether or not they publish it themselves or release
    it themselves. What's funny (and I hope they see it that way too...) is
    that there's a Linux developer, a consultant for LGP, all of about 3-4
    miles from their offices that'd love to have had the shot at it all.

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