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Thread: ALSA 1.0.17-rc1 Released

  1. #1
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    Default ALSA 1.0.17-rc1 Released

    Phoronix: ALSA 1.0.17-rc1 Released

    Four months after ALSA 1.0.16 was released, the wizards of modern-day Linux sound have released ALSA 1.0.17-rc1. This release has a plethora of new work -- in excess of 500 changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NjUxMw

  2. #2
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    How about a hypertext link to the actual download page :P

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    When said with words like 'wizards of modern sound' I now really feel I have to comment on this... I have been using alsa for ages, until recently I read some stuff about oss, the real oss that has been developed in the last 10 years. I really don't mind if people have a personal opinion about programming practices, or things like that, but according to different people alsa is hard to use for programmers, and oss is a lot better. I also noticed lately that there's about no app that doesn't support alsa, but does support oss. Also my personal experience is that with oss I have the feeling I'm in control of my audio again, able to set what output is what channel without any hassle. So what I'd like to see instead of fancy words about alsa, is an objective in-depth comparison of alsa and oss. Right now I'm not planning on using alsa, I don't see any real use for alsa over oss except that the oss build system is stupid, but on the other hand I don't need 5 additional packages to be able to actually do something with my sound again (which seems to be needed when using alsa)... So now let's do that comparison, please?

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    Maybe it is a stupid question, but does PulseAudio depricate ALSA?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    Maybe it is a stupid question, but does PulseAudio depricate ALSA?

    Nope, here is a good diagram showing where PulseAudio lies in the linux's audio structure.

    http://rudd-o.com/archives/2007/11/0...seaudio-works/

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    Maybe it is a stupid question, but does PulseAudio depricate ALSA?
    It's designed to not depricate it...
    However, PulseAudio is just in such an early state yet that it only supports stereo sound and thus leaves out configuration of surround systems (without hacking config files) and especially bass adjustment.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what I see in it as an end user.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeoBrain View Post
    It's designed to not depricate it...
    However, PulseAudio is just in such an early state yet that it only supports stereo sound and thus leaves out configuration of surround systems (without hacking config files) and especially bass adjustment.
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but that's what I see in it as an end user.
    Pulseaudio is not designed to depreciate Alsa or OSS. Alsa or OSS is still required to get "bare to the metal" with the card.

  8. #8
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    Dudes, it's deprecate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by apaige View Post
    Dudes, it's deprecate.
    Dude, PulseAudio does not do hardware device drivers. It's a sound server.

    Right from their own description.

    In a typical installation scenario under Linux, the user configures ALSA to use a virtual device provided by PulseAudio. Thus, applications using ALSA will output sound to PulseAudio, which then uses ALSA itself to access the real sound card. PulseAudio also provides its own native interface to applications that want to support PulseAudio directly, as well as a legacy interface for ESD applications, making it suitable as a drop-in replacement for ESD.
    For OSS applications, PulseAudio provides the padsp utility, which substitutes device files such as /dev/dsp, tricking the applications into believing that they have exclusive control over the sound card. In reality, their output is rerouted through PulseAudio.
    Last edited by deanjo; 06-07-2008 at 09:51 AM.

  10. #10
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    Ahem, I was only pointing out the fact that no-one spelled deprecate correctly

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