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Thread: NVIDIA 180.16 Beta Linux Driver

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by urandom View Post
    I wish they'd first concentrate on fixing powermizer, or at least giving us a clear way to disable it.
    I second that!

  2. #12
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    the perfomence in 2d working much more better now with 9800gt on ubuntu 64bit.
    180.06 was really slow in combination with firefox.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by killall-9 View Post
    the perfomence in 2d working much more better now with 9800gt on ubuntu 64bit.
    180.06 was really slow in combination with firefox.
    This was due to a bug in the glyph cache which was already fixed in 180.11.

    For me, VDPAU now works *much* better than in the older drivers and MPlayer patches. All my H.264 videos play now, only the frame ordering issues need to be fixed still.

  4. #14
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    didnt know there was a 180.11 release so i have to switch back to 178 .82 driver.Sometimes nvidia is really slow to update new driver on the homepage!

  5. #15
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    Some beta drivers are only informally announced in the nvnews forums, to speed up the process.

    The developers <-> users dialog in these forums is nice and effective too.

  6. #16
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    After having tested it for some time finally i think there is some improvement on NVS135M. Far from perfect, especially in Twinview which gives quite a hit to the performances.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by killall-9 View Post
    didnt know there was a 180.11 release so i have to switch back to 178 .82 driver.Sometimes nvidia is really slow to update new driver on the homepage!
    One of the reasons I keep Phoronix on RSS

  8. #18
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    Seems to have problem with the menu in Compiz + Murrine theme.

  9. #19
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    Default Steer away from NVIDIA IGP 8200 mobos

    Quote Originally Posted by matt8 View Post
    I was wondering which of the Nvidia GeForce mGPUs and nForce MCPs are now fully supported (i.e. on all of the north/south bridge functions handled by these chipsets, including video and audio) in Linux.

    In particular, if one buys a motherboard with one of these IGP chipsets:
    A. GeForce 8200 mGPU
    B. GeForce 8300 mGPU
    C. 750a SLI
    how much mileage vs hassle should/could be expected for getting the mobo to work well?
    In my humble opinion and personal experience, I would recommend that you stay away from mobos with the integrated GeForce 8200 chipset (aka MCP78) at this current time of writing because it takes a lot of fiddling to get them working reasonably. And even still, 2D performance takes 100% hit (on a single core). To get the sound working without popping and crackling, you need to use the latest Linux kernel (2.6.27.9) alongside the latest ALSA base 1.0.18. In terms of distros, I've found that "out-of-the-box" Ubuntu 8.10 configures the sound properly but the 2D/3D graphic performance is shocking and sometimes unplayable at times, even when viewing a Youtube vid. In fact the whole system is incredibly sluggish. Using Debian Lenny (still in testing at this time) I've found the system to be very responsive and I would recommend it above Ubuntu 8.10. However, it does not work properly "out-of-the-box" either and requires a little more work for your rewards. Firstly, to configure the sound properly in Lenny you need to update the ALSA base package from the experimental repository to get the ALSA 1.0.18 version. Then, you need to compile a custom kernel 2.6.27.9. In doing this, you must also compile a compatible NVIDA kernel module from the experiment repository source package (nvidia-kernel-source) to match your custom kernel and also install the experimental nvidia-glx package. The version of the experimental NVIDA source package at this time of writing is 177.80-2, so it does not fix the 100% CPU usage problem. But at least the Debian Lenny system is much faster (how Linux should be) and the sound works fine. I hope my verbose answer helps you.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by debian_user View Post
    In my humble opinion and personal experience, I would recommend that you stay away from mobos with the integrated GeForce 8200 chipset (aka MCP78) at this current time of writing because it takes a lot of fiddling to get them working reasonably. And even still, 2D performance takes 100% hit (on a single core). To get the sound working without popping and crackling, you need to use the latest Linux kernel (2.6.27.9) alongside the latest ALSA base 1.0.18. In terms of distros, I've found that "out-of-the-box" Ubuntu 8.10 configures the sound properly but the 2D/3D graphic performance is shocking and sometimes unplayable at times, even when viewing a Youtube vid.
    Flash nailing 1 core is a known flash-plugin bug.

    In fact the whole system is incredibly sluggish. Using Debian Lenny (still in testing at this time) I've found the system to be very responsive and I would recommend it above Ubuntu 8.10. However, it does not work properly "out-of-the-box" either and requires a little more work for your rewards.
    A board like the Asus M3N-HD works perfectly out of the box on opensuse 11.0.

    Firstly, to configure the sound properly in Lenny you need to update the ALSA base package from the experimental repository to get the ALSA 1.0.18 version. Then, you need to compile a custom kernel 2.6.27.9.
    That's all dependent on the dac being used. You do not have to compile a custom kernel either on other distro's. As mentioned boards like the M3N-HD work out of the box in openSUSE which has a 2.6.25 kernel.

    In doing this, you must also compile a compatible NVIDA kernel module from the experiment repository source package (nvidia-kernel-source) to match your custom kernel and also install the experimental nvidia-glx package. The version of the experimental NVIDA source package at this time of writing is 177.80-2, so it does not fix the 100% CPU usage problem. But at least the Debian Lenny system is much faster (how Linux should be) and the sound works fine. I hope my verbose answer helps you.
    Almost all the above issues stem from your choice of distro. Not with linux nor the chipsets. It's typical for debian to be lagging a bit in supporting new hardware.

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