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Thread: X@FOSDEM 2009: RandR 1.3, GEM, Gallium3D, Etc

  1. #11

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    The setup was a microphone with TRS connector connected to a netbook via a quarter-inch to mini jack adapter (what seems to have caused much of the problem). A Logitech web camera then recorded the video separately.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    Yes, but non-native speakers have a harder time
    What made it bad for me is that many of the speakers had very heavy accents (as compared to mine anyhow ;D), they can be tough to understand normally, let alone with noise and buzzing going on.

    Also not being able to see the slides or the speakers made the video pretty much useless.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    The setup was a microphone with TRS connector connected to a netbook via a quarter-inch to mini jack adapter (what seems to have caused much of the problem). A Logitech web camera then recorded the video separately.
    I'm not sure how the adapter (usually just a piece of conductive metal) could have caused the problem. It doesn't sound like normal interferance noise, more like the noise you get with bad microphones or lack of a preamp.

    Since you used a quarter-inch to mini jack adapter, does it mean your microphone was a HIFI/Sono microphone, in which case the mic in of any computer would provide insufficient gain (i.e. you can get loud enough sound, but you'll have to increase the gain so much you'll get the noise cranked up too)? For those you'd need a preamp between the mike and your computer mic in.

    There's mostly two types of microphones:
    - the ones for computer, that can be plugged on a computer mic in as is, but don't provide great sound unless the speaker takes extra care (impossible to use in a setting like these talks - you'd get same result you had);
    - the ones for HIFI, that provide good audio, but need a preamp before you plug them on a computer (since they're not made for computer use - without a preamp you'd also get the same result you had).

    There's also the mikes that comes with a preamp built in, which are easy to spot since you'll usually have to provide batteries.

  4. #14
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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomasu View Post
    What made it bad for me is that many of the speakers had very heavy accents (as compared to mine anyhow ;D), they can be tough to understand normally
    That, and the fact you don't see the speakers on most videos (seeing the speaker can be a great help). I'd rather see the speakers than have a video of the slides (for the slides, a link to the .pdf is better than a youtube video).

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Let's just blame Pulse Audio for the sound problems. It has certainly caused all of my Linux audio issues for the past year. In fact, Pulse Audio is so awful I'm sure some researcher will soon discover it even causes cancer, AIDS, and global warming.

    Okay, maybe not cancer and global warming, but after attempting to watch the aforementioned videos, it nearly did give me AIDS. (Well, hearing aids at any rate...)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Halifax, NS, Canada
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    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: X@FOSDEM 2009: RandR 1.3, GEM, Gallium3D, Etc

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzA2Ng
    Thanks for incorporating our suggestions about audio quality warnings, and links to easier-to-download vids, that were posted in the forum thread about the previous article.

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