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Thread: Linux to Solaris Comparison Guide?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    Where do you see flame?
    Maybe from your tone. I'm looking for help, not a chastising about memory requirements for ZFS [or as you put it by stating the obvious]. I probably wouldn't have even noticed the issue since I'm running both Solaris and OpenSolaris in VMs of 2GB RAM each, and not looking to do much with it but get familiar with the OS.

    Anyone else have any other helpful advice?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    Hehe, especially for desktop where 768MB RAM is recommended minimum...
    I've run a Solaris 10 box with ZFS root quite happily in 256Mb ram ...

    Yeah it wasn't a file server, only a VPN box, but performance seemed good to me

    Don't get me wrong here, I'm a fan of Linux, it's a much better frontend atm than Solaris ... I just happen to program on Solaris, and all our servers run it.

    I've managed to get it to install in so many systems over the years, I can do it with one hand behind my back ... but if you're new to it, and you like graphical interfaces/configuration (and not connecting as root to set up network interfaces, yes I know you can do this with user_prof now) ... It's quite a change from systems that "Just Work" (tm)

    My boss has always worked on Solaris, but moved "temporarily" to Ubuntu when we couldn't install Solaris on a specific Dell Laptop ... I managed to get OpenSolaris on the latest dell laptop that came in ... Accelerated graphics, all network cards working, bluetooth in the kernel ... but he hasn't moved on to it ... I think He'd miss the toys.

    As i said I've got Solaris 10 on my laptop, and the network setup I've got is a hacked together set of scripts that do all the connections as a normal user (including dhclient'ing to get the answers to set up resolv.conf, force rescanning for wireless networks, and interface cleanup/destroy) ... in a nice little terminal menu, but i had to make the scripts myself.

    I know ... I'm Rambling again.

  3. #13
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    This is the type of response I've been looking for! Please ramble on! How did you get your initial exposure to Solaris?

    Here's the irony, I'm a Linux user who started out in the Mac OS 7 days [mid 90s], who jumped into Linux when I found out that Apple was buying NeXT in '97. I actually prefer the command line more than the graphical environment at times [see the irony now?]. I'll happily delve into /etc/sysconfig and modify the network scripts via vi to change IP addresses, so the graphical front end is nice and all, but I can get by without it. I just want to know what is what compared to Linux and Solaris. Are there run levels? What are the comparable directories in Solaris as compared to Linux? Does /etc in Solaris still point to configuration files, etc? These are the things that I would like to know.

    So please ramble on!

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by r0d3nt View Post
    Maybe from your tone. I'm looking for help, not a chastising about memory requirements for ZFS [or as you put it by stating the obvious]. I probably wouldn't have even noticed the issue since I'm running both Solaris and OpenSolaris in VMs of 2GB RAM each, and not looking to do much with it but get familiar with the OS.

    Anyone else have any other helpful advice?
    I don't know if there's any issue, it's just recommended. As Jadrevenge said it works fine with 256MB RAM. Well, if you run Solaris you should know if there are run levels etc. I don't know if you're looking for something like this, but:

    http://doc.vic.computerbank.org.au/t...torystructure/
    http://www.debianadmin.com/linux-dir...-overview.html

    http://sharetab.com/tag/solaris-directory-structure/

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the links. I do understand the Linux directory structure, I just was looking for a comparison to see what was the same, different, or not related. The last link you provided is great. I'm going to look at it more when I have a chance...

  6. #16
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    Yeah, there are init levels ...

    0 is shutdown (not turn off)
    S is single user (super-user)
    2 is single user
    3 is multi user
    5 is shutdown (power off if possible)
    6 is reboot (nice reboot)

    the scripts to run these are in /etc/rcN.d

    Solaris additionally has "Services" ... these can be accessed through the 'svcadm' and 'svccfg' commands. if you want to add services to inet add them to the bottom of /etc/inetd.conf then run 'inetconv' to convert them to a service.

    /etc is where all the config files are generally stored.
    /usr is where all the usual apps are installed (a special directory under this is /usr/sfw which stores the 'Sun Free Ware' or GNU type packages ...)
    /opt is where the "Optional" packages are installed ... this is the place where most of your own apps should be installed.
    /var is where all the variable stuff gets stored, i.e. the log files (/var/adm/messages and /var/log/syslog)

    most commands will still work.

    Solaris has one notable improvement on Linux in the 32/64 bit ... it will quite happily run 32 bit apps on a 64 bit processor, so you don't have to work out the correct download from Adobe/others. Sorry that was an aside ...

    "isainfo -v" shows whether you are running 64 bit
    "psrinfo -v" shows you what cores you have access to

    "ifconfig -a" shows you all the "plumb"ed interface cards (same as just "ifconfig" on Linux)

    if an interface is not "plumb"ed it will not show ... interfaces are named after the driver they use, none of them are called 'eth0' they'll be called rge0, bge0, nge0, iprb0, rtls0 or something similar ... you might be able to find out which these are by using "dladm" or you can probably plumb them all automatically by using "ifconfig -a plumb"

    if you want to dhcp an interface, you have to plumb it first, then ask it to dhcp:

    ifconfig bge0 plumb
    ifconfig bge0 dhcp

    but that is all ... not this only changes the interface, not /etc/resolv.conf or /etc/nsswitch.conf

    that should hopefully get you started.

    Jon

  7. #17
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    Hi Jon,

    Awesome! Thank you so much for this info!

    The buld of this is familiar from a Linux point of view. It seems to be a lot of the "it is the same but different". I tried a few commands that I normally use, df -m and tar -xvzf, but they didn't work as I expected them to. Probably because they are the GNU versions of the software? Had to do df -h and gunzip first and then tar -xvf. Not a big deal but just different.

    Again, thanks for this very helpful comparison info, it is greatly appreciated!

  8. #18
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    "/usr/sfw/bin/gtar -xzvf" should do it.

    "df -h" should show df in a sensible amount

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadrevenge View Post
    "/usr/sfw/bin/gtar -xzvf" should do it.

    "df -h" should show df in a sensible amount
    Yeah, this goes back to the "it's the same but different" that I said above.

    Thanx!

  10. #20
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    ohh ... forgot to say; If you want a good process listing, 'prstat' should show it to you ... according to people in the know it's better than top (which, if you've installed the companion CD, is in /opt/sfw/bin)

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