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Thread: Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

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  1. #1
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    Default Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 9.10 Off To A Great Performance Start

    The first alpha release for Ubuntu 9.10 was made available yesterday and while it does net yet integrate Plymouth or any other new features, it has picked up a few new packages. Most prominently, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 1 features the Linux 2.6.30 kernel and GCC 4.4. There are also other updated packages from Debian like GNOME 2.27, but most notable are the kernel and compiler updates. We have tested out Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 1 and compared its performance to Ubuntu 9.04. While this is very early within the Ubuntu 9.10 development cycle, the results already may come as a surprise.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=13833

  2. #2
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    Pretty nice results - could you say are they more due to GCC 4.4 or 2.6.30?

  3. #3
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    It would be interesting to isolate whether these speedups come from the new kernel, or the new gcc, or something else.

    I'm guessing most of it is the new kernel.

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    Great to see the Kernel devs making an effort to improve the desktop experience ... makes me tempted to upgrade to the 2.6.30 kernel on Jaunty (not sure if thats possible)

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    Quote Originally Posted by bugmenot View Post
    Great to see the Kernel devs making an effort to improve the desktop experience ... makes me tempted to upgrade to the 2.6.30 kernel on Jaunty (not sure if thats possible)
    All:http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

    Linux 2.6.30 RC5: http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa...e/v2.6.30-rc5/

    Warning: may make your kitteh eat a dog.

  6. #6
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    The third test says
    Code:
    We had run the other tests within the compilation suite found in the Phoronix Test Suite too, and in every case Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 1 / GCC 4.4 were faster. With that said, we next moved onto looking at a compression speed test. 7-Zip compression was 4% faster with the Karmic Koala packages compared to the Jaunty Jackalope.
    Should say Ubuntu 9.10

    Just a minor glitch in the matrix i found while crusing on my favorite website.

    100% addicted to Phoronix chems.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bugmenot View Post
    Great to see the Kernel devs making an effort to improve the desktop experience ... makes me tempted to upgrade to the 2.6.30 kernel on Jaunty (not sure if thats possible)

    It should be.

    Use the kernel-package program.

    What you do is basically this:
    1. download the source code from kernel.org. Untar it to /usr/src

    2. in the linux-2.6.30 directory, copy your /boot/config-2.6.29-whatever to /usr/src/linux-2.6.30/.config

    3. Run 'make oldconfig'

    Answer any questions that pop up. If it asks questions it is because of features in 2.6.30 that are not in 2.6.28-whatever-the-hell-it-is. If you don't know the correct answer, choose the default as it's the safest setting.

    What this does is that you get as close as possible to original kernel's configuration.

    Then run the make-kpkg stuff.


    Something like this:

    make-kpkg clean
    make-kpkg --config=menuconfig kernel_image modules_image

    What this does is that it compiles the kernel and packages it into debian packages. Then you just install the .deb package.

    What this does is that it allows you to remove your current kernel (which I don't recommend) it fullfills any package dependences and it'll run all the hooks to configure grub and all that when you install it.

    Also it makes it easy to uninstall it.

    That is about the safest way to build a custom kernel. Just remember if it doesn't work then you can go back to the original one.

    good luck.
    Last edited by drag; 05-16-2009 at 12:48 AM.

  8. #8
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    Guess that kind of proves how screwed SQLite performance was because of a kernel regression.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Guess that kind of proves how screwed SQLite performance was because of a kernel regression.
    Ehm, same 'regression' on Linux, *BSD and Solaris?

    I still hope we'll see Ubuntu x86_64 on Ext 4 partition vs Macos comparison.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    Ehm, same 'regression' on Linux, *BSD and Solaris?

    I still hope we'll see Ubuntu x86_64 on Ext 4 partition vs Macos comparison.
    Same here mate!

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