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Thread: Fluendo Releases Its Own Linux DVD Player

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  1. #1
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    Default Fluendo Releases Its Own Linux DVD Player

    Phoronix: Fluendo Releases Its Own Linux DVD Player

    Fluendo, the company that's largely behind G-Streamer and produces legal audio/video codecs for Linux, has now launched its own DVD player solution for Linux. Fluendo's new DVD player software is, of course, built upon the G-Streamer framework...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzM2Mg

  2. #2
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    That's nice to have a legal DVD-Player for linux. But honestly: Who cares? VLC or xine can play dvds since like forever. Yes they have legal issues. But most people don't care about these.

    The interesting thing would be bluray playback. MPlayer and VLC can play ripped Blurays at the moment. But ripping them is a bit of a hassle.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noneus View Post
    That's nice to have a legal DVD-Player for linux. But honestly: Who cares? VLC or xine can play dvds since like forever. Yes they have legal issues. But most people don't care about these.

    The interesting thing would be bluray playback. MPlayer and VLC can play ripped Blurays at the moment. But ripping them is a bit of a hassle.
    This law should definitely not hold water. Businesses don't want to be the ones to challenge it though, so they do like Canonical and resort to playing nice with the laws and hope someone else does.

    What we need are outraged citizens pushing to get this stupid laws changed.

  4. #4
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    I just bought it.

    I like their pricing/support structure.

    The player unfortunately uses 100% of my CPU and the image keeps freezing every couple of seconds. I guess they still have some work to do :-)

  5. #5
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    how much money is for the licence and how much for the development effort? thanks.

    very nice that they do it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yfrwlf View Post
    This law should definitely not hold water. Businesses don't want to be the ones to challenge it though, so they do like Canonical and resort to playing nice with the laws and hope someone else does.

    What we need are outraged citizens pushing to get this stupid laws changed.
    Well businesses wouldn't mind challenging it if they had a chance of success, but they don't.

    Just for the record we are dealing with two different legal things here:

    Software patents for codecs. Which is why Theora is being pushed for web content even though it is technically inferior to H.264. DVDs use MPEG2 which is still patent encrusted.

    DMCA protections of digital protection schemes. Breaking a digital copyright protection scheme is illegal even if it is not for the purposes of violating copyrights. The protections themselves are protected.

    Very insane.

    VLC and such, which is insanely popular and one of the best avialable for all platforms, is technically illegal in the USA.

    For individual users this isn't a big deal, but for people wanting to use Linux in a professional capacity or OEMs that want to providing working Linux systems to end users then this is a big issue. Providing legal means for working around and licensing patents for codecs is one of the major points behind gstreamer and is a central aspect of Fluendo's business model.

    Bless them for it, also. Otherwise we'd be stuck with Helix/Realplayer type things.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Breaking a digital copyright protection scheme is illegal even if it is not for the purposes of violating copyrights. The protections themselves are protected.
    Actually everyone is entitled to create one backup copy of all their CD's, DVD's, and Blu-Ray content under the DMCA. You are entitled to break the copy protection, you just can't link to or host the tools that allow that to be accomplished.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    Actually everyone is entitled to create one backup copy of all their CD's, DVD's, and Blu-Ray content under the DMCA. You are entitled to break the copy protection, you just can't link to or host the tools that allow that to be accomplished.
    This law never ceases to amaze me in its braindead-ness. Let's hope something like this never makes it across the pond.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    Actually everyone is entitled to create one backup copy of all their CD's, DVD's, and Blu-Ray content under the DMCA. You are entitled to break the copy protection, you just can't link to or host the tools that allow that to be accomplished.
    I've never heard of this; do you have a citation? The exceptions I know of, as I understand them, are:

    1) Every 3 years, the Librarian of Congress may specify classes of works that are exempt from anticircumvention.

    2) Non-profit libraries and educational institutions determining whether to acquire a copy of a work, but only if it's not reasonably available in a form that doesn't require circumvention.

    3) Government agents performing law enforcement, intelligence, or computer security functions.

    4) Reverse-engineering of computer programs; only allowed for activities that are not copyright infringement, only for the purposes of interoperability research, only by someone with the legal right to use the program, and only if the information is not reasonably available by other means.

    5) Encryption research; only allowed for activities that are not copyright infringement, only performed on legal copies, and the information must be presented in a way that enhances the scholarly understanding of encryption and not in a way that facilitates copyright infringement.

    6) Security testing; only allowed for testing that would otherwise be legal under copyright and computer fraud laws.
    Last edited by Ex-Cyber; 07-10-2009 at 07:19 AM.

  10. #10
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    You can look up their website :-)

    It's 20 eur for the player with 1 year updates and then 5 eur for another year of updates. Fairly reasonable, even for me (I'm in a 3rd world country).

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