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Thread: Got Any Questions For NVIDIA About Linux?

  1. #101
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    Don't have time to page through this whole thread, so this may have already been asked...

    Are there any plans to extend VDPAU to accelerate decoding MPEG4 Part 10? (a.k.a. AVC / h264)

    Same question for other advanced codecs such as VC1 and (recently acquired by google) On2's VP6/7/8

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishB8 View Post
    Don't have time to page through this whole thread, so this may have already been asked...

    Are there any plans to extend VDPAU to accelerate decoding MPEG4 Part 10? (a.k.a. AVC / h264)

    Same question for other advanced codecs such as VC1 and (recently acquired by google) On2's VP6/7/8
    VDPAU already does MPEG4 Part 10 and VC1.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    VDPAU already does MPEG4 Part 10 and VC1.
    Thanks. Didn't know that.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by b15hop View Post
    Will NVidia Tegra development be available on the linux scene?
    nvidia does have linux running on tegra (plus HD deconding and opengl-es).
    However you have to sign NDA's just to get a look at the datasheets, so
    I doubt there will be a beagleboard-like device with tegra any time soon.
    (and since ms used tegra in their zunehd nvidia has to sing MS' praises
    for a while too).

  5. #105
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    On2's VP6/7/8
    I doubt (and hope) we'll never see hardware support for these proprietary video codecs. on2 should simply go away, ASAP. They have been making the ridiculous "xx% better than H.264" claim for years without delivering anything decent.

    Well, let's see what Google makes of them.

  6. #106
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    I came to this thread kinda late, but I'll ask a question anyway.

    1. What are nVidia's plans in the virtualisation space? More specifically, what are nVidia's plans for things like Xen/VirtualBox/VMware support, so that we can have fully supported 3D pass-through from a VM guest to the host OS?

    2. Related to the above question: how does nVidia see the Linux gaming market, and how have you taken steps to gauge its size?

    Do you think efforts on your part to improve the performance of "hosted" (read: Windows) games would be worth it (i.e lead to what you want - increased hardware sales)?

    3. Have you ever considered producing a native Direct3D implementation for GNU/Linux?

    4. How much influence do you have over gaming development houses? For example,encouraging them to use portable APIs such as OpenGL and/or SDL, which would make their software portable across more systems, which in turn would lead to increased nVidia hardware purchases by people who run alternative systems (Mac OS X, GNU/Linux).

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by parityboy View Post
    1. What are nVidia's plans in the virtualisation space? More specifically, what are nVidia's plans for things like Xen/VirtualBox/VMware support, so that we can have fully supported 3D pass-through from a VM guest to the host OS?

    2. Related to the above question: how does nVidia see the Linux gaming market, and how have you taken steps to gauge its size?

    Do you think efforts on your part to improve the performance of "hosted" (read: Windows) games would be worth it (i.e lead to what you want - increased hardware sales)?

    3. Have you ever considered producing a native Direct3D implementation for GNU/Linux?

    4. How much influence do you have over gaming development houses? For example,encouraging them to use portable APIs such as OpenGL and/or SDL, which would make their software portable across more systems, which in turn would lead to increased nVidia hardware purchases by people who run alternative systems (Mac OS X, GNU/Linux).
    1. VirtualBox already supports guest 3D acceleration
    2. this is a virtualization application thing not nVidia related, imho
    3. Thas is not possible as DirectX and Co. are a Microsoft technology(tm)
    4. just look on how much influence nVidia had regarding PhysX implementation in games. there are like 5 games...

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Licaon View Post
    4. just look on how much influence nVidia had regarding PhysX implementation in games. there are like 5 games...
    http://www.nzone.com/object/nzone_physxgames_all.html
    Looks like more than five to me.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by md1032 View Post
    Actually, this is the list you should be looking at and yes it's pathetically small.

    PhysX is nice, but its GPU-accelerated version hasn't caught traction yet. My guess is that most developers will move to OpenCL or Compute shaders or another, GPU-agnostic solution in the future.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Licaon View Post
    1. VirtualBox already supports guest 3D acceleration
    2. this is a virtualization application thing not nVidia related, imho
    3. Thas is not possible as DirectX and Co. are a Microsoft technology(tm)
    4. just look on how much influence nVidia had regarding PhysX implementation in games. there are like 5 games...
    1. Didn't know that. Does that mean guest Windows 3D calls are passed through directly to the hardware on a Linux host? That's the question I'm asking.

    2. Fair point.

    3. Direct3D is an API specification. You can't copyright an API, last time I checked. If that was the case, WINE would not exist.

    4. Aye, and yet they seem to have a certain amount of influence over certain games, like Crysis, which seem to run noticeably and consistently better on nVidia hardware. Hence the question.
    Last edited by parityboy; 09-21-2009 at 02:21 PM.

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