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Thread: EU probes Oracle-Sun deal, cites open-source issue

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by L33F3R View Post
    Name 1 mainstream European semiconductor company. Guess what, all the best ones are in america.
    It doesn't get much more mainstream than ARM Holdings, does it? Maybe you don't see the logo all over the place, but I think there are more ARM processors in service than x86 ones: for example there's one in every Nintendo DS, Wii, iPhone, and most iPod models, and that's just a few popular products that jump to mind. ARM is the rule rather than the exception for mobile stuff, and does pretty well in wired embedded stuff also.

  2. #52
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    Infineon and ST Microelectronics were both in the top 10 worldwide last year, both European.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by L33F3R View Post
    rly though. less and less military funding and more and more healthcare, welfare, w/e else funding. Whether this is a good or bad thing is debatable.
    Don't know about the other eu-states, but here in germany the general direction is quite the opposite. There used to be (and by american standards I guess there still is) alot of welfare, but the conservative and the liberal parties, which will with ~90% certainty win the elections this month, want do decrease it.

  4. #54
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    i think there are more arm cpu's actually. it would make sense because almost every phone uses them. But what needs to be remembered is that they are licences off to dozens of companies. I had a hear about ST and they seem to be doing well. What i should have noted is that we wont be seeing any serious horsepower come out of arm arch for a while.

    for reference
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semicon..._for_year_2008

  5. #55
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    I don't think anyone's mentioned TSMC:
    Source: TSMC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Address : <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSMC>

    Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company is the world's largest dedicated independent semiconductor foundry, with its headquarters and main operations located in the Hsinchu Science Park in Hsinchu, Taiwan. TSMC's market capitalization as of 1 January 2009 is US$40.4 billion.

    Although TSMC offers a variety of wafer product-lines (high-voltage, mixed-signal, analog), TSMC is best known for its logic chip product line. Various fabless high-tech companies such as Qualcomm, Altera, Broadcom, Conexant, Marvell, NVIDIA, and VIA are customers of TSMC. Some fab-owning companies like Intel and AMD also outsource some production to TSMC[3].

  6. #56
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    I think people forget how much semiconductor manufacturing there is in Europe. There's AMD now global foundries, Qimonda, X-fab and Toppan Photomask just in Dresden. As mentioned there's also Infineon and STM. But also semi design companies like Ericsson, Nokia Siemens, defense contractors etc. Ericsson is in the process of acquiring Nortels CDMA/LTE business and is a serious player. Other semi companies in Europe are NXP and some smaller companies. And I think we should differentiate between semiconductor design companies and semiconductor companies. All GPUs are manufactured by TSMC in Taiwan. AMD is on it's way to become a completely fabless company. And it's not like other countries can't do the same stuff, ATi was Canadian before AMD bought them.
    Last edited by Penti; 09-18-2009 at 08:58 PM.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zhick View Post
    Don't know about the other eu-states, but here in germany the general direction is quite the opposite. There used to be (and by american standards I guess there still is) alot of welfare, but the conservative and the liberal parties, which will with ~90% certainty win the elections this month, want do decrease it.
    It's kinda retarded (no offense) to compare it like that. No country in the world spends as much on health care as United States. They spend a lot more then people think, the government is huge in the US not just the defense industry which gets federal money. They have a huge budget deficit. They should tax more then most european countries maybe. At least definitively more then Switzerland and your (US) neighbor Canada. Eu countries have a budget deficit ceiling of 3% of GDP they should keep under, US is currently on a budget deficit over 7%. To do a comparison I would pretty much have higher costs running a business as self employed in the US with health insurance then I would in Sweden where it's payed through (payroll tax for employees, social security taxes for self employed) taxes (where I'm covered even without ever having earned/payed a cent to the insurance system). Through the government (taxes) they already pay as much as Swedes do per GDP. Yet Sweden manage to have more doctors and nurses employed (per head/1000 people) and less people dying from deceases i.e. ranks higher/better in the statistics. All without any private health insurance on the side or private hospitals (they are run by regional governments where we elect representatives every for years).

    It's not like private systems are free either. Having a dual system where both are working poorly isn't exactly good either. Overall in western european countries there also used to be less need to use the welfare system. Changing realities and neoliberal policies have pushed for a system where less people is actually needed in the workforce. But it's hardly social security and unemployment insurance that takes up all the budget. Either way "high-tax" countries tend to get very good value from there tax money. Few have succeeded creating a truly low tax system. (With low costs overall and people not living in shanty towns). For that matter US has never really been a low tax country. It's a country of (former) federal monopolies, federal price regulations and a lot of other government intervention. Currently a country of medicare, medicade and social security. Programs with huge spendings. Total health care spending is projected to reach 17.6% of GDP in US this year anyhow. OECD average is around 9%. They also performs under the OECD averages regarding hospital beds, doctors, nurses, life expectancy, infant mortality etc. Even though a party rules here in Sweden now that was against the health care reforms in the fifties, it's not like they have tried to dismantled the system under their 3 years in power. Conservatives don't mean less spending on "welfare". Just means attitude change. And due too the expected downturn and maybe not so excepted financial crisis the "moderate workingparty" government (as opposed to workers party) do all the things they criticized the previous government for like hiding unemployment, pointless programs for the unemployed, not creating jobs and leaving people in long-term unemployment and just paying these people to do nothing, passivising them as they said before they took power. Hypocrisy is everywhere.

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