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Thread: Gallium3D Support For Haiku Operating System

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Haiku is meant to be super fast, sleek and smooth because it's solely developped as a desktop OS. Linux is a big, fits everything jungle that needs to be tied together with ugly hack in distro's like Ubuntu, and is not really optimised for desktop use. Haiku, doesn't have these problems.
    Thanks, now it makes sense. Not a fan of yet another OS (with the possibility of even more forks) but WTH...

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaestroMaus View Post
    Thanks, now it makes sense. Not a fan of yet another OS (with the possibility of even more forks) but WTH...
    I wouldn't mind a fast OS system that is sleek and can run at decent speed on my EeePC 900 :/ Fedora doesn't even run X without 256MB RAM.

    I mean c'mon... And everything is open source and portable so I don't really see the problem here. It's just some folks who want to resurrect their favo OS. What's the problem

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Haiku is meant to be super fast, sleek and smooth because it's solely developped as a desktop OS. Linux is a big, fits everything jungle that needs to be tied together with ugly hack in distro's like Ubuntu, and is not really optimised for desktop use. Haiku, doesn't have these problems.
    Haha good joke I'd love to see this Haiku to be at least half as fast as Linux or any other OS. Don't spread FUD, Linux isn't big. It's hard to understand you only use just some part of the Linux kernel archive? Desktop distros are optimized for desktop use (or at least they should be and if they're not, nothing prevents you from doing this...). Fedora probably has every heavy feature enabled, so if you want compare something to Haiku use Arch Linux with similar DE like Haiku has, etc. You can only dream about some Linux advantages on desktop like interactivity, responsiveness and much more...
    Last edited by kraftman; 09-06-2009 at 02:03 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    Haha good joke I'd love to see this Haiku to be at least half as fast as Linux or any other OS. Don't spread FUD, Linux isn't big. It's hard to understand you only use just some part of the Linux kernel archive? Desktop distros are optimized for desktop use (or at least they should be and if they're not, nothing prevents you from doing this...). Fedora probably has every heavy feature enabled, so if you want compare something to Haiku use Arch Linux with similar DE like Haiku has, etc. You can only dream about some Linux advantages on desktop like interactivity, responsiveness and much more...
    Ubuntu is supposed to be the slick, stripped down Linux distro and it runs like shit on a pentium3. Now if I would turn all these features of, then I would not get all the advantages of Linux...

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Ubuntu is supposed to be the slick, stripped down Linux distro and it runs like shit on a pentium3. Now if I would turn all these features of, then I would not get all the advantages of Linux...
    I know what you mean. I'm talking about strict e kernel advantages (like preemption) not features like compiz, some scripts etc. To make a fair comparison, compare some thin distro to Haiku. Btw. I ran Kubuntu 8.10 or 8.04 on Duron 850Mhz, 512MB SD Ram and it ran very good (probably it wasn't full of scripts or something like this yet).

    Edit:

    In theory if you put Linux kernel to Haiku's environment you won't make it slower. My point is some distros can be bloated, but Linux kernel isn't.

    P.S. If Ubuntu is supposed to be slick and stripped down Linux distro it doesn't mean it is
    Last edited by kraftman; 09-06-2009 at 02:37 PM.

  6. #16
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    @kraftman actually Haiku also has some other good points such as higher preference for native apps thus reducing multi toolkit bloat

    haiku speedwise is probably not as fast as linux yet but in many cases it is already faster for many tasks than BeOS (considering BeOS isn't opetimised for newish hardware...BeOS however kicks Linux's Butt on old HW and I am comparing a very light Archlinux install to it)

    Also have you not seen all the people that are having problems with Linux desktop latency? I men get real the big distros shouldn't be running a server kernel on a desktop distro

    Haiku stands a far Better chance of dethroning Windows IMO than Linux because it has GUI ease of use as a high priority when it hits alpha download it and check it out sure its not mature but it shows promise. The good design enherently leads to low learnig curve which Im not sure I've seen a Linux distro that has this yet.

    And don't forget ever other OS had to start somewhere as well...

  7. #17
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    I don't want to even compare Linux and Haiku. I use Linux on the desktop, and I agree that it's probably not for everyone. It's GREAT for me - but not for people that don't really care about computers. The great thing about Haiku is - it's /just/ a desktop OS. And a fast one at that...

    The way I would describe it is - Mac OS X but free and open source, with a neat and snappy UI rather than heavier and flashier UI.
    Last edited by philcostin; 09-06-2009 at 05:53 PM.

  8. #18
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    It is great how Gallium3D can be used in so many OS, everybody wins, and the code duplication is less.

  9. #19
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    I have nothing against Haiku itself. Heck I don't even know if it is any good, I never even heard of BeOS or Haiku before. My only beef is that we should all trie to make Linux get some real desktop market share before we start splintering up in other opensource branches (which keeps happening for some reason).

    @cb88: You do realize that it is a personal preference your choosing here. Not a universal better preference. FE: I want "multitoolkit bloat" because that enables me to run more programs which in turn gives me a bigger database to nitpick from, I want a server grade kernel running on my desktop and I want a flashy desktop.

  10. #20
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    MaestroMaus there is no such thing as a "Server grade kernel" - except maybe in Windows where drivers for Windows server have to be inspected and signed off...

    A desktop targeted kernel however will benefit a desktop user more than a server targeted kernel because it is tuned to slightly different things. On the desktop you would want to use BFS (Brain Fuck Scheduler) rather than the CFS that is in Mainline and is scalable to 4096 processors. BFS only scales efficiently to about 16 processors but is much more responsive to the user and therefore is much better on the desktop.

    It is clear here that many of you do not know what BeOS and Haiku are all about. Firstly, the BeOS shell had a set of UI guidelines/philosophies which many people loved, the other thing that people loved about BeOS was that it is BLOODY EXCELLENT at multitasking. Even under extreme load there is no lag on user input or the UI. Multimedia performance in BeOS/Haiku is miles ahead of Linux - even using the Vesa driver you can play several high res videos (with audio) simultaneously without dropping a frame. Nobody thinks that a user focused desktop with these features is worth developing? Though yes, the userland of Haiku is a bit too weak, so even as a relatively new Haiku enthusiast I will be using Linux full time for years to come.

    I wrote a blog entry about Haiku the other day, some of you may find my view on security for Haiku interesting - Link to My Blog!

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