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Thread: Blender 2.5 Alpha Brings Major Changes

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  1. #1
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    Default Blender 2.5 Alpha Brings Major Changes

    Phoronix: Blender 2.5 Alpha Brings Major Changes

    For those interested in 3D modeling and graphics, you will want to check out the first alpha release of Blender 2.5. Blender 2.5 is bringing major changes to this free software 3D graphics application...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=Nzc0MQ

  2. #2
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    Boo, I don't see the Freestyle engine mentioned on there.

    Looking forward to the next Durian project, though!

  3. #3
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    Great, I've been looking forward to these overhauls for some time now. If I can convince my 3D drivers to work, I'll need to take a look at it.

  4. #4
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    Guys, this is big. This is really really big.

    The UI has been totally revamped and has moved from "ugh, this is the worst UI I've ever seen" to "3d Studio should be jealous of this". Despite being an alpha-0 release, I've had surprisingly few problems with this - rendering is faster than ever, object manipulations work fine, Unicode paths *finally* render correctly, fonts are antialiased out of the box... I haven't been this excited for an open-source project since the birth of Firefox!

    I've subscribed myself to the RSS feed I'm really really looking forward to alpha-1.

  5. #5
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    Unlike some open source arts graphics stuff Blender always had some features and advantages over proprietary 3D suites.

    Namely the ability to crank out models very fast. The UI for blender, while ugly-looking, was extremely effective at making mesh modelling fast. A person very experienced in Blender could crank out new models faster using Blender then any other 3D application out there. Using it is like playing Quake games; with one hand on the mouse and the other on the keyboard pressing keyboard combos and all that. You don't go through and search through icons or menu items.. it was all about memorizing keyboard commands and key combos, which is _exactly_ what you need for a professional graphics application.

    Any decent, powerful GUI application, can be controlled in that manner.

    Now other Linux graphics suites are not really like that... Like Gimp or Cinelerra just are kinda odd without really substantial advantages to the UI.


    Now this meant that Blender had a steep learning curve and it was very odd to use compared to other things. Also it suffered in terms of parts of the animation, composition, and other features compared to other 3D applications.

    I think that working with actual artists in creating these animation shorts and video games is helping the developers out massively and they have overhauled huge parts of the application, improving things and adding important features.

    The thing that fascinated me about Blender is it's substantial gaming engine.

    A person can use Blender and Python to crank out high performance 3D games fairly quickly. Google and go look at Youtube and you can find lots of examples of people playing around. All sorts of heavy duty special effects and advanced physics features are available. Also the fact that it runs on almost any Linux system regardless of the drivers is a huge plus.. most gaming engines expect people to be using proprietary Nvidia drivers.

    This 2.5 is suppose to revamp things massively and I am really looking forward to the new scripting language and game engine improvements.
    Last edited by drag; 11-26-2009 at 09:26 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Now other Linux graphics suites are not really like that... Like Gimp or Cinelerra just are kinda odd without really substantial advantages to the UI.
    This is not totally true. While I have not experience with Cinelerra, Gimp is the first graphics tool I've used and I find it's GUI very practical.
    For example you can have the folder with the pictures open and just drag them on Gimp to open them without click on the folder first to bring it front and then drag them. This and some other features because of it's gui make my job faster.
    Last edited by Apopas; 11-26-2009 at 10:37 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Now this meant that Blender had a steep learning curve and it was very odd to use compared to other things. Also it suffered in terms of parts of the animation, composition, and other features compared to other 3D applications.
    It only has a steep learning curve because of the absolutely horrible documentation, I don't see this situation improving with the re-write.

    Instead of hiring a full-time coder, the Blender Foundation should have hired a technical writer to document everything properly.

  8. #8

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    I wonder if Blender can finally handle benchmarking in an autonomous mode now...

  9. #9
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    I've been following Blender since before it became Free Software,and I compiled 2.5 from SVN for a while so this isn't really news for me, but I'm glad to see this gets some attention - as it should! Blender 2.6 (the "final" stable version out hopefully around Siggraph10) will be a dream come true

    The learning-curve can be steep (like learning GNU/Linux) but there's definitely a reward at the end. Now in 2.5 things are already much more logical and "easier", but it's still Blender. Keyboard shortcuts are essential to learn for ALL applications you seriously use, including GIMP. I don't follow the irritation over The GIMP's UI since I can work fast in it using shortcuts and GUI. These are complex tools and most people complaining don't need or use 90% of the capabilities, yet they want to click a button and "create" a Pixar short without knowing anything about 3D/2D...


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    I wonder if Blender can finally handle benchmarking in an autonomous mode now...
    I think the Blender developers have a lot of other important things to work on first, but try to contact Cambell Barton (ideasman42 on the BA forum) who currently works on the Durian project. Here's a thread he started:

    http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?t=165866

  10. #10
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    The problem with the Gimp GUI is that the GUI is unintuitive and difficult to manage (multiple windows, no context-sensitivity, confusing icons and menus). The learning curve is pretty steep, but once mastered it becomes a surprisingly capable and efficient application. Unfortunately, many people get turned off after the initial contact (same as with Blender).

    The other issue with Gimp is the dissonance between user expectations and its supported workflow. One common complaint is, "how do I draw a simple circle with Gimp?" Go ahead, fire a new window and try this - just a simple circle, like mspaint. Most newcomers will give up here (Gimp sucks), turn to google or try all tools one by one (Gimp is hard!) Personally, I believe Blender is better in this regard and doesn't suffer from this issue.

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