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Thread: Wine 1.1.36 Released With Better SM 4.0 Support

  1. #1
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    Default Wine 1.1.36 Released With Better SM 4.0 Support

    Phoronix: Wine 1.1.36 Released With Better SM 4.0 Support

    Version 1.1.36 of Wine has been released to provide in a released version all of the development work done to this major free software project over the past two weeks. Wine 1.1.36 does carry some interesting changes, including better Shader Model 4.0 support, completion of 16-bit separation, fixes for many memory leaks, improved debugging for MinGW, MSHTML fixes, and various other bug-fixes. The Wine 1.1.36 release announcement can be read at WineHQ.org...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=Nzg2OQ

  2. #2
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    Nice, but if they'd just make more OpenGL games then they'd be easy to port to Linux to begin with. =P Here's hoping the future will be more OGL and cross-platform-focused in general, and so far it has been. ^^

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yfrwlf View Post
    Nice, but if they'd just make more OpenGL games then they'd be easy to port to Linux to begin with. =P Here's hoping the future will be more OGL and cross-platform-focused in general, and so far it has been. ^^
    http://www.osnews.com/story/22706/Wh...nd_Not_DirectX

  4. #4
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    The trouble with arguments that get much of their strength with a "Microsoft is evil" sentiment is that, no matter how true they might be, they look like comments from a hater's club and are dismissed as such. They would have a greater opportunity for acceptance if they would just stick with the more technical side of how GL is better than DirectX.

  5. #5
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    wine is not a directX app... wine used openGL up to 100%

    wine only kicks microsofts strategic on binding games on the windows platform.

  6. #6
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    Currently DirectX is the leader because of feature superiority.

    DirectX is however unusable without an SDK.
    DirectX is spagetti code to the max.
    DirectX is only tied to Windows Vista and 7 and is therefore not cross platform.
    DirectX is not developped in the interest of the entire world, only for one company and it only exists to kick OpenGL back to where it came from.
    DirectX is not portable.
    DirectX is just... A Microsoft POS.

    'nuff reasons to me...

  7. #7
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    Wine 1.1.36 Released With Better SM 4.0 Support
    I don't think Wine supports SM 4.0. I would title this something like
    "Wine 1.1.36 is another step closer to support SM4.0"

    BTW. Does this title came only from those commits?
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 ige opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 breakc opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 emit opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 iadd opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 lt opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 if opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 break opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 endif opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 endloop opcode.
    wined3d: Recognize the SM4 cut opcode

    It seems to me that this commits only add some constants but don't move things forward a lot.

  8. #8

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    Some commits mention SM4 directly but a lot of work was done to add more geometry shader infrastructure, tests and a lot of code was restructured.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    wine is not a directX app... wine used openGL up to 100%

    wine only kicks microsofts strategic on binding games on the windows platform.
    Oh, wait really ...

    You missed 1) the post I was replying to 2) my post

  10. #10
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    Most video games use a third party gaming engine. People tend to try to avoid programming a whole lot in DirectX or OpenGL if they can help it.

    These engines usually provide things like collision detection, physics, rendering, etc etc. And, of course, major players will modify and improve aspects of the engines to make their games look more competitive.

    I don't know what it is like recently, but at least around the 2005-2007 time frame (when I last looked into it) most major commercial engines had a OpenGL rendering backend. Not everyone, but most of the popular ones. So it's not really that huge of a OpenGL vs DirectX if you really think about it; if that is still the case. Wheither or not the game is 'DirectX' or 'OpenGL' is just a configuration change during build time for lots of games (and a lot of debugging, of course)

    DirectX is just the best choice on Windows.

    Of course game makers also have the attractive solution of using Wine and Winelib to port to Linux. Wine is not just about making Windows applications run on Linux, but there is also a development aspect to it... They have tools to build and run applications completely from Linux that are binary compatible with Windows. Developers who want to have cross platform compatibility can use Wine to help them do it and you end up with a much superior solution then just throwing the Windows binary at it and hope it works.

    If I was a commercial game maker that would probably be the approach I would take if I had a existing game on Windows.

    If it's closed source and gets good performance then what does it matter exactly how it runs on Linux? (hint: it doesn't). Anything to lower the costs of supporting Linux is a good thing really.

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