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Thread: Adobe Rants Over Linux Video Acceleration APIs

  1. #101
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    Hoodlum, I find it interesting how your examples only show the positives of "the leveling effect" but none of the negative effects it has as well with those same societies.

  2. #102
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    That's because people are immature to use the knowledge they are able to get, in the right way. I's just that they don't get the true deep knowledge, just the skin-deep, easily accessible one.
    How can help them? By giving them even more knowledge.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
    Too many stuff to reply to individually, so I'll just sum it up:

    HTML5 draft spec states Theora as a standard codec: wrong. It did in the past, then got removed.

    Theora will be put back in the draft spec: It's unlikely to come back. Of course "unlikely" doesn't mean "impossible," but still.

    The Internet should only use non-patented formats: My personal opinion is "no, the Internet should use whatever it wants to." And if the HTML 5 draft will stay as-is, it's going to.

    It's in the best interests of Mozilla to not support H.264 when the spec finalizes: Nope. It's in the best interests of Google, not Mozilla.

    It's in the best interests of Mozilla to fight for re-introduction of Theora in HTML 5: Yes. But it's unlikely to happen. Apple and M$ have veto powers. See mailing list posting above.
    No one really expects theora to come back, though I guess it could. Google is the only one that can decide the codec, even if something else is chosen. Google are trying to stop using h264 this year because of the huge royalties they will have to pay for sub-12 minute videos soon. Whatever they pick will be the standard, official or otherwise.


    Using Theora will not result in royalties: Apple disagrees. Are they telling the truth? No idea, but that's what they're saying.
    This was debunked ages ago. This is just their reason for voting against it - the risk of submarine patents - something you can neither prove nor disprove. They will benefit from h264 being chosen, their motives are obvious.

    Firefox should enforce a "Philosophy of Freedom": Enforce? No. Support? Yes.
    This sounds like BSD VS GPL to me. Fact is, this idea that people will contribute out of kindness has proven to be less effective.

    [I]W3C themselves say: "The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international community where Member organizations, a full-time staff, and the public work together to develop Web standards. Led by Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, W3C's mission is to lead the Web to its full potential." Translation: "M$, Apple, Mozilla, Google and a crapload of other companies/organizations come to us and get their stuff in the spec so web developers have something they can rely on."

    What exactly does "universally accessible information" mean here? No idea, the poster didn't elaborate.
    Notice it said "and the public" there too? Yep, you missed that in your "translation".

    This is why I said you did not understand the web. Your "translation" just proves you do not even know the history of its existence. When I said "universally accessible information" as the principle on which the web is based I expected you to know at least the basic history. Really, it is not my job to educate you.

    My last post gives you a brief history of the web that explains why it exists. (A system to access information anywhere). Tbh I just cannot be bothered trying to teach you its entire history, Wikipedia exists - at least until less informed people push so much patent-laden crap into html we can't use it anymore

    All hail our patent-troll gods eh?

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Hoodlum, I find it interesting how your examples only show the positives of "the leveling effect" but none of the negative effects it has as well with those same societies.
    I am only explaining the intention. Knowledge gives power. You cannot control how people use it. Educated people more often make better choices, but if you want you can learn how to create a bomb online too. This would not have been easily found knowledge for the general public previously.

    Knowledge sets you free. Both for good and bad purposes.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoodlum View Post
    I am only explaining the intention. Knowledge gives power. You cannot control how people use it. Educated people more often make better choices
    And usually large corporations are full of educated people. Food for thought.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    And usually large corporations are full of educated people. Food for thought.
    True, but even the educated one lose his personage inside a faceless company.
    Education except knoweledge, builds and a certain character. On the contrary, large corporations care just for the first part and neglect/delete the second one. So, finally, large corporations act like single entities with knowledge but without education most of the times.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    And usually large corporations are full of educated people. Food for thought.
    A large majority of the most tyrannical dictators through history have been of great intelligence too but this is just getting side-tracked now.

    I guess you could see it this way:

    Knowledge is power.
    Too much power corrupts.
    The internet equalises the access to knowledge (and thus, power).

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    And usually large corporations are full of educated people. Food for thought.
    "Educated" is debatable in the case of large corporations, deanjo. It should be noted that it's at least somewhat easier to hold down work within a larger corporation as it's ossified, trying to maintain it's money sources at all costs- it's much easier to hold down work being less than competent when there's a massive management bureaucracy a' la "Office Space"; and that show's sadly a lot closer to the truth than one would think it to be- it's part of what makes it funny to many.

    Food for thought.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoodlum View Post
    A large majority of the most tyrannical dictators through history have been of great intelligence too but this is just getting side-tracked now.
    Your observation is sound...except for the, "just getting sidetracked now." part. This thread's been sort of side-tracked for quite a bit now.

  10. #110
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    At one time the pen was mightier then the sword but now days we have shredders and liquid paper.

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