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Thread: VirtualBox 3.1.4 Beta Brings 40+ Fixes

  1. #1
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    Default VirtualBox 3.1.4 Beta Brings 40+ Fixes

    Phoronix: VirtualBox 3.1.4 Beta Brings 40+ Fixes

    VirtualBox 3.2 isn't yet around, but the Sun (well, Oracle) engineers are going to be releasing a 3.1.4 release shortly. To get some tests out there prior to the final release they have issued a beta of VirtualBox 3.1.4, which offers 40 fixes/additions...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzkzNA

  2. #2
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    Great. I love virtualbox.

  3. #3
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    Expect it to be the last version you'll ever get.

    Oracle spend about 15-30 seconds on VirtualBox in their 5 hours presentation. All they said was it will be used as a sand box for developers.

    MySQL got about 30 seconds, and OpenOffice also about 30 sec.

    OpenSolaris 0 seconds and Sun's compilers 0 seconds.

    Larry panicked when he was asked about MySQL in the QA, so it is very safe to say that MySQL will be integrated with Oracle Manager, and then slowly killed afterwards.

    He said that MySQL would be developed primary by the open source community.

    Many of the Java tools, would get merged with Oracle's, which to my knowledge are not open source.

    So it will be interesting to watch mariaDB, and if Red Hat includes it in Fedora.

  4. #4
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    Oh... great. I hope you are wrong.... even though I know you aren't.........

  5. #5
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    Yes, it is really a shame, that such great software is getting killed

    There were some interesting comments in the /. article.


    All of it was mentioned, with the exception of the C, C++, and Fortran compilers.

    * I don't remember specific plans for Solaris, other than that it will be the OS running a lot of the Oracle appliances they're talking about.
    * Various Java news. Integrating HotSpot with JRocket. Unifying the programming models/API for Java SE and Java ME. Java SE 7 will include support for multi-core and better support for multiple [non-Java] languages.
    * Netbeans goes forward as a "lightweight" dev environment, while JDeveloper is the "strategic" platform. Netbeans will get improved support for scripting, dynamic languages, and mobile.
    * OpenOffice.org will continue as a separate business unit. As with everything, Oracle is bragging that it plans to boost investment in it. They mentioned an Oracle Cloud Office based on OpenOffice.org, which aims to offer the same experience on the desktop, Web, and mobile (as Microsoft is talking about with Office 2010).

    As an Oracle employee, I can tell you "fear-based fealty" is not at all how Oracle works. They have a long history of acquisitions, and the strategy is always the same: Keep the best and brightest from the acquired company, and let everyone else go. Heck, they've bought entire companies before specifically so they could get their best engineers (virtual iron). They're practically obsessed with getting the best people, not the best bootlickers.

  6. #6
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    God, I hope they don't kill or close source it. It's the only VM that works well on FreeBSD and I use it daily to run 2008 server VMs, Win 7 desktops and one-off development environments. I even have a a FreeBSD server that stays logged in with VMs running for some smaller servers.

  7. #7
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    Perhaps it's time for us to look closely at KVM.

  8. #8
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    I think that KVM works pretty damn well already. The only issues i've had with it has been USB passthrough support. The gui is also still kind of rough. The core is pretty solid already though.

  9. #9
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    You people are forgetting the fact that all these things are open source licensed. That means that even if oracle wants to wash their hands of it, someone else is likely to pick it up -- not like MS software, where if they decide to drop it, its dead. I could see Red Hat picking up MySQL. VirtualBox is nice, but at its core is the same qemu code that most of the other stuff is also based on. For example, Virtual Machine Manager, which is another Red Hat project, pretty much does the job -- just lacks the bling that you find in VirtualBox and VMWare.

    Regarding OpenOffice.... well if Oracle doesn't want to keep working that, then someone pretty much *HAS* to. It is the ONLY viable competitor to MSOFFICE and is pretty much the STANDARD for non-msdonkey platforms.


    In conclusion, we are NOT seeing the end of the world. We are just seeing the start of a possible reorganization -- depending on what Oracle decides to do.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    You people are forgetting the fact that all these things are open source licensed. That means that even if oracle wants to wash their hands of it, someone else is likely to pick it up -- not like MS software, where if they decide to drop it, its dead. I could see Red Hat picking up MySQL. VirtualBox is nice, but at its core is the same qemu code that most of the other stuff is also based on. For example, Virtual Machine Manager, which is another Red Hat project, pretty much does the job -- just lacks the bling that you find in VirtualBox and VMWare.

    Regarding OpenOffice.... well if Oracle doesn't want to keep working that, then someone pretty much *HAS* to. It is the ONLY viable competitor to MSOFFICE and is pretty much the STANDARD for non-msdonkey platforms.


    In conclusion, we are NOT seeing the end of the world. We are just seeing the start of a possible reorganization -- depending on what Oracle decides to do.
    Well put, and hopefully the reorganization will mean great open source programs get moved to better maintainers as their "home base". Will they be developed faster than Sun did in their new homes? I sure hope so. Unfortunately, business mergers can potentially only serve to get rid of competition and that is usually bad of course. At least with software it isn't as difficult to create a company as other industries that rely on more infrastructure, as software is a service and support industry really.

    Who knows, maybe Google, Canonical, or Red Hat will pick up Virtualbox, MySQL, Java, or OpenOffice. Interesting times ahead none-the-less.

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