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Thread: The x264 Project Bangs Out A Blu-Ray Encoder

  1. #1
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    Default The x264 Project Bangs Out A Blu-Ray Encoder

    Phoronix: The x264 Project Bangs Out A Blu-Ray Encoder

    While over the past year the FFmpeg project has been working on Blu-ray support, last November MPlayer gained codec support for most Blu-rays and HD-DVDs, Xine-lib gained better Blu-ray disc support, today the first working free software Blu-ray encoder has arrived...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODE3OQ

  2. #2
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    Well "support" for mplayer is overrated. It is very unlikely that you can buy a new bd and play it directly using libbluray. What matters is m2ts support - and there subtitles are still missing for mplayer. vlc 1.1/git or xbmc can show em. But its really nice to see that x264 can be used to create m2ts, as some bd titles with h264 used very bad encoders, most vc1 encoded titles looked better. also bluray menu support is something that need to be implemented - for those movies which are not just in the biggest file on the disk.

  3. #3
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    as soon as x264/ffmpeg gets complete blu ray support we can expect a flood of shareware/commercial blu ray encoding tools show up. all of which will be freeloading on top of those two tools.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kano View Post
    its really nice to see that x264 can be used to create m2ts
    Do you even have a clue what you're talking about? Someone with "Debian Developer" as title should be able to differentiate between codec and container.
    x264 can't create M2TS files, because the MPEG2 Transport Stream format is a container format. You can create raw AVC files using x264, which you have to mux into a transport stream using another tool.

  5. #5
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    It is not my "title", i never set this. I am NO debian maintainer of anything. I create Kanotix, that would be correct.

    Certainly you are correct that m2ts is a container but when mplayer is mentioned with bluray support then not the codecs are not the problem but pgs subtitles.

    Btw. do you really need to distinct between x264 (tool) and libx264? The lib can be used by ffmpeg, mencoder or whatever. Also you are not correct that x264 (tool) can only create h264 raw - from h264 -h:
    Outfile type is selected by filename:
    .264 -> Raw bytestream
    .mkv -> Matroska
    .flv -> Flash Video
    .mp4 -> MP4 if compiled with GPAC support (no)
    What holds anybody back to create m2ts output type?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kano View Post
    Also you are not correct that x264 (tool) can only create h264 raw
    I never wrote "can only create raw". Raw output is the requirement for Blu-ray authoring tools. Quote: "Do keep in mind that you have to export to raw H.264 (not MKV or MP4) or else the buffering information will be slightly incorrect."

  7. #7
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    Won't some kind of proprietary copy protection/DRM make commercial BD impossible for FLOSS implementations?

    Just like we had with Lucas Arts DVDs?

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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    Won't some kind of proprietary copy protection/DRM make commercial BD impossible for FLOSS implementations?

    Just like we had with Lucas Arts DVDs?
    yep. Blu-ray players are forbidden from playing unencrypted BDs, so this doesn't matter for users at all. To clarify, AACS is required but not BD+. There's no chance that x264 or anyone else will be able to duplicate AACS since 1) it's illegal in the largest software dev country in the world (USA), 2) AACS allows for key revocation, so the encryption would have to be completely broken, and 3) AACS is actually really good encryption.

    Blu-rays on Linux... HAHAHAHA

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbrown96 View Post
    yep. Blu-ray players are forbidden from playing unencrypted BDs, so this doesn't matter for users at all. To clarify, AACS is required but not BD+. There's no chance that x264 or anyone else will be able to duplicate AACS since 1) it's illegal in the largest software dev country in the world (USA), 2) AACS allows for key revocation, so the encryption would have to be completely broken, and 3) AACS is actually really good encryption.

    Blu-rays on Linux... HAHAHAHA
    I suggest you refrain from commenting on this since you clearly don't have any idea about encryption or video players.

    First off, ENCRYPTION is in NO WAY restricted.... anywhere. USA/DMCA does NOT restrict encryption -- it restricts UNAUTHORIZED DECRYPTION. If you are the one doing the encryption, then you are, by definition, authorized.

    Secondly, one can know the ENCRYPTION keys withOUT knowing the DECRYPTION keys. It does NOT compromise the encryption for a "for public use" key to be used in the encryption of public materials.

    Third, JUST WHERE did you come up with the idea that a BD player won't play an unencrypted disk? What a BD player WON'T play is an ENCRYPTED disk that was made AFTER that player had ITS DECRYPT KEYS REVOKED.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbrown96 View Post
    yep. Blu-ray players are forbidden from playing unencrypted BDs, so this doesn't matter for users at all. To clarify, AACS is required but not BD+. There's no chance that x264 or anyone else will be able to duplicate AACS since 1) it's illegal in the largest software dev country in the world (USA), 2) AACS allows for key revocation, so the encryption would have to be completely broken, and 3) AACS is actually really good encryption.

    Blu-rays on Linux... HAHAHAHA
    AACS... All I can say if F-...

    Even if somebody was to implement the whole thing, there would be no keys and two patent infringements... *sigh*

    Well fsck that... happy downloading ripped h.264 movies and put 'em on a DVD. Much better anyway...

    EDIT: Typo's

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