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Thread: Will OpenSolaris 2010 Make It Out This Month?

  1. #11
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    "... Most of its parts remains closed ..."

    http://hub.opensolaris.org/bin/view/Main/no_source

    1) the chinese and japanese fonts
    2) the "flash install" and "live upgrade" ... (which are effectively replaced under the ZFS system anyway)
    3) Acroread, flash and Realplayer ... which never belonged to Sun
    4) man pages for devices and programs that are obsolete or open versions have been used.
    5) certain cluster software
    6) certain older device drivers (usually from the manufacturers themselves) and hardware specific implementations of some Sun kit, usually because these have been replaced by existing open-source versions.
    7) sparc grpahics drivers, I don't personally know if these have been replaced or not ...
    8) the XSun server (replaced with XOrg), fonts, and some Adobe code for displaying PostScript.

    It seems like a lot till you realise that it pretty much doesn't affect any OpenSolaris desktop user, and probably not most servers.

    the problem only occurs if you don't have access to Chinese/Japanese/Korean fonts, and I'd guess that those are available nowadays.

    I would say that very few parts are now closed source.

  2. #12
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    Default Fork OpenSolaris

    Quote Originally Posted by jadrevenge View Post
    "... Most of its parts remains closed ..."

    http://hub.opensolaris.org/bin/view/Main/no_source

    1) the chinese and japanese fonts
    2) the "flash install" and "live upgrade" ... (which are effectively replaced under the ZFS system anyway)
    3) Acroread, flash and Realplayer ... which never belonged to Sun
    4) man pages for devices and programs that are obsolete or open versions have been used.
    5) certain cluster software
    6) certain older device drivers (usually from the manufacturers themselves) and hardware specific implementations of some Sun kit, usually because these have been replaced by existing open-source versions.
    7) sparc grpahics drivers, I don't personally know if these have been replaced or not ...
    8) the XSun server (replaced with XOrg), fonts, and some Adobe code for displaying PostScript.

    It seems like a lot till you realise that it pretty much doesn't affect any OpenSolaris desktop user, and probably not most servers.

    the problem only occurs if you don't have access to Chinese/Japanese/Korean fonts, and I'd guess that those are available nowadays.

    I would say that very few parts are now closed source.
    This is interesting to note. Thanks for the information but what is your point? Having few of the parts still closed source doesn't change anything nor having none of it closed source. It doesn't make the real freedom for OpenSolaris.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sosouke View Post
    This is interesting to note. Thanks for the information but what is your point? Having few of the parts still closed source doesn't change anything nor having none of it closed source. It doesn't make the real freedom for OpenSolaris.
    I'm a Solaris user of many years ... I recently bit the bullet and installed OpenSolaris on my new laptop (as opposed to vanilla Solaris) when my old one died ... I'm still getting used to it, and I'll have to get more memory for the beast it only has 2 Gb ...

    I agree with you that the way things are going isn't the nicest looking ...

    The only thing I was commenting about is that almost all of OpenSolaris is _now_ open source, or at least the bits that matter and you're only left with the propitiatory stuff that Sun never truly owned in the first place ...

    I heard that Oracle are looking to keep OpenSolaris around so that it can develop Solaris on the cheap, but only as long as the focus is in the direction that Oracle want it to head ... although this might well just be my interpretation of some malicious gossip

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadrevenge View Post
    I'm a Solaris user of many years ... I recently bit the bullet and installed OpenSolaris on my new laptop (as opposed to vanilla Solaris) when my old one died ... I'm still getting used to it, and I'll have to get more memory for the beast it only has 2 Gb ...

    I agree with you that the way things are going isn't the nicest looking ...

    The only thing I was commenting about is that almost all of OpenSolaris is _now_ open source, or at least the bits that matter and you're only left with the propitiatory stuff that Sun never truly owned in the first place ...

    I heard that Oracle are looking to keep OpenSolaris around so that it can develop Solaris on the cheap, but only as long as the focus is in the direction that Oracle want it to head ... although this might well just be my interpretation of some malicious gossip
    Oracle might do the thing that we hoped for but it doesn't change the fact that OpenSolaris isn't totally free. There are actually existing forks of the OpenSolaris today and one of them is the OSUNIX, a true open source fork of the OpenSolaris. I just hope for saving OpenSolaris and its community. Sorry,. but I am very skeptic on Oracle's long term commitment for OpenSolaris.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sosouke View Post
    Oracle might do the thing that we hoped for but it doesn't change the fact that OpenSolaris isn't totally free. There are actually existing forks of the OpenSolaris today and one of them is the OSUNIX, a true open source fork of the OpenSolaris. I just hope for saving OpenSolaris and its community. Sorry,. but I am very skeptic on Oracle's long term commitment for OpenSolaris.
    Using Oracle (Database) here and them trying to screw us over by retrospectively changing the licenses that we had, I can concur with you ...

    I was born an optimist and I have a nasty feeling that I will be an optimist till I die ;P

  6. #16
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    I've temporarily given up after over three years of OpenSolaris. It's Fedora for now.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomservo View Post
    I've temporarily given up after over three years of OpenSolaris. It's Fedora for now.
    Sorry but Fedora will never get those enterprise features of OpenSolaris.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gleb_sitnikov View Post
    Sorry but Fedora will never get those enterprise features of OpenSolaris.
    Solaris used to be really stable, low memory footprint high reliability ...

    We've got machines that have only been rebooted once, and that was 3 years ago when we had to move them to the new building ...

    If I'm setting up someone else's laptop then I will stick Ubuntu on it (not sure about 10.04 yet) but for me, with the features I need, I install Solaris ...

    I have ZFS disks, including multiple ZFS usb external disk and flash drives, it's got raid and duplication and compression in a way that no other FS has.

    Solaris has a very, very stable API ... I can transfer programs compiled on one machine and run them on another, even if it's a different release of Solaris, in fact Sun used to guarantee that this would be true.

    The driver support used to be limited but, where the drivers were provided, they worked exceptionally well, and yet again there was no real issue in compiling your own drivers in that the driver API didn't change ... (please don't ask me to compile another SCSI device for Linux)

    I'm used to Vanilla Solaris. I know it's quirks. I know how to get it to do all I need it to. I can do IPSEC, I can set up IKE tunneling with fixed addresses. I have written scripts to configure the interfaces in a similar way to Network-Automagic, but at the prompt back when wireless was just being implemented ...

    This new pretender, OpenSolaris, I still don't trust, but I have installed it ... It eats up memory, my old 1Gb laptop was fine with Solaris 10 (ufs disks), but this computer has 2Gb OpenSolaris b134 (zfs disks) and seems to crawl when it runs out of memory (firefox, thunderbird, sqlplus and 3 Java programs and I'm there) ...

    On the plus side, it does do graphics hardware acceleration, it does do much better power management, It does have much better control of powering up and down the CPU ... I have access to the new package manager (which is still very lacking in Apps and really could do with caching and indexing the list of packages and some descriptive text would be nice) and the OpenLDAP server package, unlike the Ubuntu version, came with all the syncrep and duplicating features already compiled

    I guess I'll get used to the new quirks ... i need to set VC_ALL=C in my .profile to get some SDL apps to run, I need to run pfexec /etc/init.d/openvpn start to start the VPN, rather than pick OpenVPN client from the network automagic at the top ... but I will get there.

    Sorry that was a lot of rambling.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gleb_sitnikov View Post
    Sorry but Fedora will never get those enterprise features of OpenSolaris.
    I was using it on my desktop.

  10. #20

    Default OpenSolaris Roadmap

    I found an interested link about OpenSolaris Roadmap from Oracle:
    http://www.eecis.udel.edu/%7Ebmiller...Oracle-Sun.pdf

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