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Thread: NVIDIA Publishes Code For X Synchronization Fences

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by mirv View Post
    To a degree in some cases. If nvidia drop support for a card, then it's pretty much well gone as usable under Linux. Open source drivers don't really suffer from this problem.
    Vendor lock-in can be nasty.
    And yet noone in this thread (or on this entire forum from what I can see) touched upon the possibility that the OSS radeon driver might become "good enough" one day to make AMD feel like they're wasting their time on fglrx. If that happens, new hardware and feature implementations will be slow-going, even with specifications.

    Not to mention that patent trolls may find another market to destroy.

    But no, the above is unthinkable even though the prospect of NVIDIA walking out on their proprietary driver (despite the fact that it has the most complete and high performance OpenGL implementation to date) is an inevitability.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    Please tell me what the real benefits of running Linux are, I am really interested.

    I would like to learn from such an experienced user who has followed the scene for 6 years.
    Oh, I don't know.... I guess the endless programming and script language support, the out-of-box web and database technologies, the extremely powerful and feature rich command line interface... the countless text parsing and manipulation utilities for starters?

    Linux made complex application development, and web development easy. My web site can thumbnail a video by just plopping it in the web directory,


    I can then transcode that video and serve it on-the-fly regardless of codec or container format.


    On my five 1080p screens, I have on an average session 40 terminals and 3 different browsers open on those high end NVIDIA cards. I'm a web developer who runs completely off of online doc and a text editor, not a gamer.

    Occasionally, and I mean -occasionally-, I play a video or use Wine for a little gaming.

  3. #103
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    You are aware that all of this works on windows too, right?

    I don't mean like "Windows is just as good", I mean that python, bash, perl, sed, awk, all the databases, development tools, all of those work on windows. Not similar software, but exact same ones.

    I really hate using Windows, but when I had to make something cross-platform and make it run on Windows, I used bash, make, MinGW, python, Qt, expat, dirent, firefox, thunderbird and vim. Other than the shitty window management, I didn't even notice it was Windows.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    You are aware that all of this works on windows too, right?
    It doesn't make it easy. An array of hamster wheels can run the motor of an electric car, but the simple ability to do so doesn't make the solution practical.

    I can see where you argument is going. Drilling down further, ultimately Linux is a kernel and the kernel has little influence on the desktop experience. But if you change the scope to "distribution", the picture becomes more clear: Linux distributions are just far better suited for heavy development and experimentation. Linux is my own expandable modular warehouse full of tools and little areas I can use to build things, and thousands of little adapters and plugs which let me use anything in any scenario, anywhere in the building and often outside, too.

    Windows is a garage with a small toolbox sitting in the corner with a fixed layout and proprietary wall outlets.

    I cannot really develop in the same way on Windows as I can on Linux, even using the same tools.

  5. #105
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    Yes, it takes quite a bit of effort to make Windows usable.

  6. #106
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    There's too much for me to quote now, but I do want to get back to a repley to Coreboot:
    No AMD does not develop it. No AMD does not need it. Yet AMD releases spec for it, so it is not only in pure selfinterest of AMD to go FLOSS.

    To another reply:
    I am not trolling. I just wanted put the issue on the table to discuss, by both sides. It appeared succesful as I am no longer the only vocal defender of the 'FLOSS side'. Discussions are about convincing.

    So far I am actually enjoying good arguments on both sides

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by V!NCENT View Post
    To another reply:
    I am not trolling. I just wanted put the issue on the table to discuss, by both sides. It appeared succesful as I am no longer the only vocal defender of the 'FLOSS side'. Discussions are about convincing.
    I think we should all be glad the issue is on the table.

    The free driver vs closed argument in quite relevant to us all I'd think.

    There are political, philosophical and technical aspects to it.

    The technical ones are fairly easy to enumerate and get consensus on. The others, not so much.

  8. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    Please tell me what the real benefits of running Linux are, I am really interested.
    The packaging system, very low latency, so it's suitable for working on audio, no viruses, flexibility, security, scalability (why would I like to waste cores running Windows or OS X? plain stupid), many things work just out of the box, powerfull DE like KDE thus great applications.

  9. #109
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    Uhm, I don't get it. Proper synchronization to avoid tearing is of interest for everyone, not only NVidia. Why should NVidia be criticized for this contribution?

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    The packaging system, very low latency, so it's suitable for working on audio, no viruses, flexibility, security, scalability (why would I like to waste cores running Windows or OS X? plain stupid), many things work just out of the box, powerfull DE like KDE thus great applications.
    Other than latency, all of these are more or less direct results of the development process and source being open.

    Which was my point.

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