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Thread: Who Contributed The Most During X Server 1.9?

  1. #1
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    Default Who Contributed The Most During X Server 1.9?

    Phoronix: Who Contributed The Most During X Server 1.9?

    Two years ago we compiled a list of the top contributors to the X Server over the years and that was followed by compiling a similar list of the developers behind Mesa. Tiago Vignatti has now compiled some statistics surrounding the top contributors to X.Org Server 1.9 and related X components just looking at this most recent development cycle. There's also numbers for the input, video, and Mesa components too...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODU2Mg

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    - When looking at the video work done by employer in terms of change-sets, the top ten list comes down to: VMware (33.3%; mostly Gallium3D and core Mesa work), Intel (27.7%; their Intel code obviously plus the new GLSL compiler and other contributions), Videotron (7.7%), Marek Olšák (7.4%; a hobbyist most often working on the ATI Mesa / Gallium3D drivers), Kenneth Graunke (5.8%; hobbyist contributions to Intel, etc), LunarG (3.5%; the modern-day consulting equivalent of what Tungsten Graphics was, led by Jens Owen and Alan Ward), Red Hat (3.3%; mostly the ATI drivers plus Nouveau and various other contributions), Luca Barbieri (2.3%; Nouveau driver), Corbin Simpson (1.3%; ATI Gallium3D), and AMD (1.1%; the ATI code).
    Go Marek!

    This is really impressive, he outperformed RedHat and AMD combined!

    I found this interesting:
    The AMD developers are now going back to work in private to begin supporting the yet-to-be-released AMD Radeon HD 6000 series graphics cards.
    This is not a bad thing, as it means faster support for the next generation of graphics cards, but does that mean that they will not keep working on r600c in the future?

    r600g is mostly done by the community / outside of AMD, I believe, so I guess that this is where most of the improvements will take place, as is the case with r600g.

    I hope the new shader compiler is done soon.

  3. #3
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    No pie graphs? :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    This is not a bad thing, as it means faster support for the next generation of graphics cards, but does that mean that they will not keep working on r600c in the future?

    r600g is mostly done by the community / outside of AMD, I believe, so I guess that this is where most of the improvements will take place, as is the case with r600g.

    I hope the new shader compiler is done soon.
    As AMD-Developers said their main objective is to develop the raw basics to enable the community to do the rest.

  5. #5
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    LoC numbers doesnt mean how efficient one does the job

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    Not to say Marek wouldn't be an awesome coder.

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    Marek is truly remarkable. Hands down!

    I recall that Corbin did pretty much the same half a year ago. I miss him, development would be waaay much faster!

    (As a matter of fact the speed of development would double since nowadays only Marek is working on it. I mean r300g.)

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    Don't forget Tom Stellard who's been doing some rocking work on r300g over the summer!

  9. #9
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    Good point, but for some reason I have only seen about a dozen commits from him.

    It reminds me that I expected a Phoronix article about the results of gsoc. I really hope Tom's work has come to fruition which could be measured by Micheal. However, the glsl compiler change came in the worst time for him I think.

  10. #10
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    What strikes me the most from this article is the continued lack of upstream support from Cannonical/Ubuntu. I appreciate what Cannonical has done to popularize Linux on the desktop but their regular and continual practice of patching packages for their own use and not contributing most of the work upstream has always disturbed me. It's one of the many reasons why I changed camps to Fedora a couple of years ago (being able to test out BTRFS early on was the other reason).

    Anyway I have nothing against Ubuntu except that I wish they would give more back to the Linux community at large in the form of upstream patches/packages.

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