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Thread: More Details On Unigine's OilRush Game

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  1. #1
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    Default More Details On Unigine's OilRush Game

    Phoronix: More Details On Unigine's OilRush Game

    A few days ago Unigine Corp announced OilRush, their first in-house game that's coming from the creators of one of the most advanced multi-platform engines. Unigine developers are also fond of Linux and properly support it with the OilRush game receiving the same level of support and there will be a Linux client on launch-day...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODU2OQ

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    - It depends upon the distributors as to whether the Linux version of OilRush will incorporate any DRM, as in Digital Rights Management.
    Sad to hear. In any case, if it has DRM in linux, you have lost a buyer.

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    I don't think they will be so stupid to include a drm, otherwise nobody will buy the linux version.

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkbasic View Post
    I don't think they will be so stupid to include a drm, otherwise nobody will buy the linux version.
    Any way there will be like >95% of Windows+PS3 players. With the rest of the <5% players, some will buy it (with DRM), like the players that use wine or cedega.

    Better of course is that they don't include DRM, it is bad for the user.

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    For wine you often have to use patches to get rid of drm. Basicially it is hardy possible to avoid piracy, it is in a way even good to increase interest. A game that is not copied is a flop anyway.

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    It's not up to them if they use DRM or not. It's up to the publisher.

    Besides, if the humble indy bundel/world of goo has thought me anything, it's that >9 out of 10 people will pirate it without DRM so apperantly it does pay off to use DRM.

    Don't take this personal: It's entirely possible you have good intentions, but they have to take others into account...

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    Mostly the trouble is though that the more effective a DRM is, the more invasive it is. They do range from simple key checks from installing rootkits and virtual devices to the user system, after all. Imo depends entirely on what kind of a rootkit it is whether it's acceptable or not. If it goes even close to touching the Linux kernel, I say kill it with fire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaestroMaus View Post
    Besides, if the humble indy bundel/world of goo has thought me anything, it's that >9 out of 10 people will pirate it without DRM so apperantly it does pay off to use DRM.
    Sorry, but this is malicious FUD.

    http://blog.wolfire.com/2010/05/Savi...e-Indie-Bundle

    - It's 2.5 out of 10
    - Some of it is accounted for by other factors

    This is still way too much for a donation-based game, but keep it real.

    I'm not a gamer and I play very occasionally, but I've purchased a number of Linux titles. I won't buy a game with DRM. I even tried the HL2 demo through wine, and Steam kept locking me out. No thanks, never again. Native and DRM-free, then I'll buy it, and happily donate much more than average too.

    EDIT - a one-time key check like in Doom and Quake games is OK for me. Phoning home is not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    Sorry, but this is malicious FUD.

    http://blog.wolfire.com/2010/05/Savi...e-Indie-Bundle

    - It's 2.5 out of 10
    - Some of it is accounted for by other factors

    This is still way too much for a donation-based game, but keep it real.

    I'm not a gamer and I play very occasionally, but I've purchased a number of Linux titles. I won't buy a game with DRM. I even tried the HL2 demo through wine, and Steam kept locking me out. No thanks, never again. Native and DRM-free, then I'll buy it, and happily donate much more than average too.

    EDIT - a one-time key check like in Doom and Quake games is OK for me. Phoning home is not.
    Not only is 25% estimated to be freeloaded but the other customers payed on average between €8 and €14. And those consumers did have charity in mind and did know the value of the product was €80,-.

    It's all a matter of definition. If you think only freeloaders are pirates; then you right. However in my book: everything below €80,- is pirating it as well. You just hurt the company a bit less. Being less of a freeloader is still you being freeloader.

    The argument about "but it was allowed to set your price below €80,-" doesn't count since that also includes the option for setting it to €0,-. It should have been a call on moral values; and as seen, almost no one did the right thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaestroMaus View Post
    However in my book: everything below €80,- is pirating it as well. You just hurt the company a bit less. Being less of a freeloader is still you being freeloader.
    Come on, the whole point of a bundle is that the combined price ends up being less than the full price of the individual parts. Otherwise what would the point of bundling everything together be? That discount wouldn't have been all the way down to the average donation amount, but it's misleading to believe the bundle was worth the full 80.

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