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Thread: HDCP DRM "master key" found?

  1. #1
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    Default HDCP DRM "master key" found?

    Here's an interesting tidbit:

    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/h...selector-blogs

    If true, does this mean that the OSS radeon driver could now (theoretically) connect to HDCP-enabled devices such as HDTVs? E.g. somehow embed a newly-generated key into the driver so that it could perform a HDCP handshake on a card's HDMI interface?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisr View Post
    If true, does this mean that the OSS radeon driver could now (theoretically) connect to HDCP-enabled devices such as HDTVs? E.g. somehow embed a newly-generated key into the driver so that it could perform a HDCP handshake on a card's HDMI interface?
    Hmm, was that not possible before? One thing I imagine will probably be possible because of this is being able to plug non-HDCP-certified devices to a graphics card on Windows and extract or display content with the device depending on what you're looking to do.

  3. #3
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    Default How could Linux devices use HDCP before?

    Quote Originally Posted by nanonyme View Post
    Hmm, was that not possible before?
    The purpose of HDCP was to create a "protected stream" for HD data, and it was my understanding that the Open Source drivers simply didn't turn the "protected path" functionality in Radeon cards on. Isn't HDCP part of the DRM functionality within UVD that AMD cannot possibly document for contractual reasons?

    I can imagine HDCP being more of an issue for HDTVs than for monitors.

  4. #4
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    IIRC, ATI's current cards decouple DRM hardware from video acceleration bits during design in order to be able to release documentation about their video and 3D engine. On the other side, HDCP is not implemented in software in any of the devices that support it. So, Every nVidia and ATI card that support HDCP has some hardware to support it and make the electronic negotiations between devices. Since these parts are not documented because of legal matters and ATI has divided these modules just for legal reasons, I will not bet on open source driver support of HDCP.

    Bridgeman can clarify this more I think.

  5. #5
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    This is irrelevant to connecting TV's to your computer. Linux does NOT IMPLEMENT HDCP IN ANY WAY, therefore the HDCP handshake is not required AT ALL. HDMI works perfectly on Linux. If your TV is capable of HDCP, that does NOT mean that it requires an HDCP SOURCE. Only if the SOURCE is HDCP, you need a monitor capable of decrypting it.

    HDCP has NO EFFECT ON LINUX AT ALL. It is totally irrelevant.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    This is irrelevant to connecting TV's to your computer. Linux does NOT IMPLEMENT HDCP IN ANY WAY, therefore the HDCP handshake is not required AT ALL. HDMI works perfectly on Linux. If your TV is capable of HDCP, that does NOT mean that it requires an HDCP SOURCE. Only if the SOURCE is HDCP, you need a monitor capable of decrypting it.

    HDCP has NO EFFECT ON LINUX AT ALL. It is totally irrelevant.
    Indeed, yes. If the source device doesn't want to encrypt the signal, HDCP doesn't come into play. My post was from a purely technological point of view. You can use HDMI devices just right away without utilizing any DRM hardware. Again to clarify. My post was just for technical insight.

  7. #7
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    Note:
    Encrypted compressed crap --> UVD --> Encrypted DEcompressed crap --> HDCP TV
    **OR**
    UNencrypted compressed video --> video decode hardware or software --> UNencrypted DEcompressed video --> ANY TV.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silent Storm View Post
    Indeed, yes. If the source device doesn't want to encrypt the signal, HDCP doesn't come into play. My post was from a purely technological point of view. You can use HDMI devices just right away without utilizing any DRM hardware. Again to clarify. My post was just for technical insight.
    For technical insight, what this means is that IF you are able to find an HDCP source, you can perform the HDCP handshake with it using the master key and generate decrypted data, which you can either display on a non-HDCP monitor, store on disk (though we're talking uncompressed HD video, you might not want to know just how BIG that would be...), or SPLIT off to MULTIPLE displays (HDCP or not).

    What this does NOT mean is that you can play BD disks on Linux. Once that level is properly hacked, HDCP still won't apply since HDCP is ENTIRELY for between the GPU and the monitor. It simply wouldn't make any sense to add HDCP to data that is already clear just to take it away later.

    Uncompressed 1080p, 24bit, 30fps:
    ~1.5 GB per SECOND.

    Take your typical 90 minute movie, you're looking at 8 TB.

  9. #9
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    Bloody edit limit...
    Math glitch... those numbers are a little large... not GB/TB, but Gb/Tb (bits, not bytes). But still... 1 movie = 1 TB.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    Bloody edit limit...
    Math glitch... those numbers are a little large... not GB/TB, but Gb/Tb (bits, not bytes). But still... 1 movie = 1 TB.
    Wow.. you would need a RAID0 of two hard disks at full-speed just to *read* it in realtime!

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