Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 93

Thread: Mark Shuttleworth Talks About What Ubuntu Contributes

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,353

    Default Mark Shuttleworth Talks About What Ubuntu Contributes

    Phoronix: Mark Shuttleworth Talks About What Ubuntu Contributes

    For those wishing to spend some time reading a long blog post or are interested from Mark Shuttleworth's perspective regarding what Ubuntu / Canonical contributes to the free software ecosystem (since it's widely regarded that their actual code contributions are very low), here's the post for you...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=ODU5OA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    141

    Default

    that's pretty good.

    but a lot of people see that canonical is not red hat. we can't just expect other companies to be as awesome as red hat is with contributions.

    and hey, it could be a lot worse. imagine if canonical was completely ungrateful and ordered around kernel or x server developers to fix things.

    or worse yet, what if every bit of code canonical wrote was binary only and dynamically linked to the vanilla code that make up a distro. and if part of that code was written by microsoft through a strange deal.


    hahaha. see how good canonical looks now compared to the above?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Under the bridge
    Posts
    2,126

    Default

    The point was that free software didn't require another Red Hat or IBM. The ecosystem was already in place when Canonical was founded, all it needed was a vehicle to attract users.

    And that is what Ubuntu is.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    The point was that free software didn't require another Red Hat or IBM. The ecosystem was already in place when Canonical was founded, all it needed was a vehicle to attract users.
    That's crap, it's not like there were too many developers working on free software.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    The point was that free software didn't require another Red Hat or IBM. The ecosystem was already in place when Canonical was founded, all it needed was a vehicle to attract users.

    And that is what Ubuntu is.
    Agreed. But it would help to give credit where credit is due, as well. The very substantial portions of Ubuntu's top applications that are written by the likes of Red Hat, Collabora, Novell, and (as much as I hate to say it) Oracle, should somehow get free name brand recognition from using Ubuntu. If I were an ordinary end-user, I wouldn't mind at all seeing a splash screen pop up giving credit to "Red Hat and contributors" for some popular Gnome program. OpenOffice and Firefox already have fairly prominent advertisement for their primary sponsor; the Know Your Rights thing on Firefox's first launch, and the Help -> About on Firefox, both advertise Mozilla Foundation prominently. Similarly Oracle is given credit twice for OpenOffice: in their splash screen on every startup, and in About.

    Ubuntu is/was necessary, but it is important that the companies who put actual engineering effort into the projects Ubuntu depends on remain visible, rather than invisible. You see, Ubuntu has an incentive to ensure that these companies stay in business, and that they continue to employ the engineers who work on the projects they depend on. Without them, "the community" may take up some of the slack, but the fact is that there are quite a few projects that are primarily driven by the commercial open source model. We (the users) need to financially support these companies when we are able. Well... maybe not Oracle, but definitely the others I listed.

    Also, I'll point out that one of the top 5 or top 10 GNU/Linux desktop engineering companies, Novell, already produces a distribution that (imho) directly competes with Ubuntu on ease of use. Now don't get me wrong; OpenSUSE as old as version 10.0 was really, really user-unfriendly. But I've been using 11.3 for a few weeks, after being a long-time Ubuntu user, and my impression is that the community built around OpenSUSE, and the distribution itself, is so polished and fresh that it could very well become just as popular as Ubuntu. And the funny part about that is that Novell is also one of the top engineering companies, so they aren't "just" a vehicle for delivering GNU/Linux to the masses.

    If Novell can do it, why can't Canonical? Do your fair share of engineering, and let your user enthusiasts and fans build out the community. It's a successful model for OpenSUSE. Build it, and a few people will come; then they will tell their friends; then everyone will come. It's a latent effect, but you've gotta have patience.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Under the bridge
    Posts
    2,126

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    Agreed. But it would help to give credit where credit is due, as well. The very substantial portions of Ubuntu's top applications that are written by the likes of Red Hat, Collabora, Novell, and (as much as I hate to say it) Oracle, should somehow get free name brand recognition from using Ubuntu. If I were an ordinary end-user, I wouldn't mind at all seeing a splash screen pop up giving credit to "Red Hat and contributors" for some popular Gnome program. [...]
    If the developers of said popular Gnome program put in a splash screen, the user will see it. If not, they won't. Can't see what Ubuntu has to do with this.

    For what it's worth, many applications come with a Help -> About screen that lists contributors.

    If Novell can do it, why can't Canonical? Do your fair share of engineering, and let your user enthusiasts and fans build out the community. It's a successful model for OpenSUSE. Build it, and a few people will come; then they will tell their friends; then everyone will come. It's a latent effect, but you've gotta have patience.
    But Canonical does create code (do read the Mark's blog post, it's an interesting read). They may not spend as much energy on Mono/Gnome/[your favorite app] but they write code and share it with the rest of the ecosystem as they should.

    Frankly, this "Canonical doesn't write code" mantra is bollocks.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    But Canonical does create code (do read the Mark's blog post, it's an interesting read). They may not spend as much energy on Mono/Gnome/[your favorite app] but they write code and share it with the rest of the ecosystem as they should.

    Frankly, this "Canonical doesn't write code" mantra is bollocks.
    I never claimed Canonical doesn't write code. It's the way they go about it that people question. Papercuts more or less stands on its own as the only example of Canonical putting their own staff to work on Free Software projects that are not strictly service-based.

    We've got the Ubuntu One platform (including the music store), which is highly monetized, and AFAIK the backend is closed source. If users decide they don't like Canonical's pricing model, they can take it or leave it. The client code is open, but the backend is run as a tight ship, not unlike iTunes or any of a myriad of other walled gardens. Even opening up the cloud storage portion of Ubuntu One would be generally useful, as an alternative to something like FTP or Samba. I prefer the user interface and integrated nature of the Ubuntu One client to something like FileZilla, but it's simply not possible to set up your own Ubuntu One server without starting a reverse engineering project from scratch.

    Then we've got Launchpad, whose open source code is so difficult to decipher and set up that most people give up and just use the official launchpad.net installation. I went from zero to having an FTPES server backed by an OpenLDAP directory server over SSL in about 12 hours. I set up a mail server with IMAP+SSL, SMTP, roundcubemail, and local mboxes in about 4 hours. I accomplished both of these tasks as a relative "newbie" to these environments. There were a ton of configuration files to edit, and a mind boggling array of settings and options. It was hell -- or so I thought, until I started playing with Launchpad.

    I spent over 3 days trying to configure even a basic Launchpad service on my own box, and gave up without being the least bit successful. Canonical has an incentive to make Launchpad the open source project as sysadmin-unfriendly as possible, while making their own (monetized) Launchpad.net as user-friendly as possible. Are they intentionally making it difficult to install? Your guess is as good as mine.

    My point is that "use and give back to upstream" has been a necessary mode of operation for the success of almost all free/open projects. Well, that's a bit black and white; I will qualify it further as "use, and give back, to the extent you are able". So we don't expect Grandma to be able to contribute anything back, unless she happens to be a technically savvy grandma with a career of state-of-the-art software engineering behind her! The more capable you are, and the bigger (in terms of manpower) your entity is, the more that is expected of you, relative to the amount of useful work you get out of the software as a user.

    But look at Canonical. By your own insistence BlackStar (and I agree with you 100%), Canonical does write code. They have a staff of professional software engineers. But how do they invest their engineering resources? Do they work on generally useful projects that are fully open source and applicable to a wide array of Linux distros? On the whole, not really. Do the contribute back to the specific projects to which they owe the majority of their success? On the whole, not really. I will be interested to see whether Canonical ever steps up their upstream contribution as their revenue stream increases with their popularity and business acumen. If they become bigger than Red Hat but still contributing less than Gentoo, we'll know for sure that something is very wrong with their philosophy, and it will be abundantly clear that they have defied the tacit contract between distributions.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    The point was that free software didn't require another Red Hat or IBM. The ecosystem was already in place when Canonical was founded, all it needed was a vehicle to attract users.

    And that is what Ubuntu is.
    I see. So they are a marketing company... which should make the companies who pay Canonical for support feel just awesome.

    "Sorry we can't fix your issue fast enough, all we are setup to do is attract users and take your money. "

    If Canonical only had a community supported distro, that would be one thing. But since they sell support for the release, they need to put more into the engineering side, and not lean on upstream to work on the hard issues for them.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    Well spoken, BlackStar.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,946

    Default

    Canonical should stand up and seriously invest in Linux as a platform for opensource entertainment and gaming(subscription, head money etc), instead of shifting around icons on desktop.

    I know people are willing to pay good money for GOOD drm-free games and there are methods to make them real.

    Do something that is real. Like RedHat does.

    Then, Mandriva will eventually vanish or will have to change as well.

    And they should really stop pushing unfinished unstable code into mainstream.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •