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Thread: KDE Software Compilation 4.5.2 Is Here

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
    Who cares. It's awesome, stable and very fast here. And that's enough for me
    Same here. SC 4.5 works smooth and stable for me since RC stage but I'm also using openSUSE and not some other distribution where the unstable dependencies are packaged.

  2. #22
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    If you're experiencing lag in KDE, disable the composition.

    If it still does not solve your problem, use a different widget other than Oxygen.

    I also notice that some systems, mainly nvidia binary drivers enabled ones, tend to leak a bit of memory. In contrast, my Intel GPU netbook idles nicely at around 170MB after lots of programs have been used and closed.

    I would also like to note that you can use GTK network manager with KDE. It's not Gnome exclusive. This happens automatically if no other kde front-end is installed.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mat69 View Post
    As if the rest -- including your -- posts were more civilized...
    You got me there

    Who can't handle the heat should not enter the kitchen.
    I so happen to have a flamethrower

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    Nice work! I don't think I'm needed here.
    You dissapoint me, BlackStar. You should have came in here first, screw up one tiny little freaking detail and I could have kicked your ass

  4. #24
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    Trolling is a very subtle art. You all fail in it.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    KDE apps start faster then Gnome apps. Compare your ubuntu memory usage to Kubuntu and explain me, why ubuntu uses more then 800MB after while? Unoptimized, slow and memory hungry code is present on ubuntu, it's called dumb C hacks, python everywhere and mono. What bfs has something to what you wrote earlier? Oh, it was some kind of brain fuck for the moment I guess.

    Maybe in next ten years it become feature rich and usable as KDE is now.
    I've never experienced 800 MBs. You might try looking at Firefox. But regardless it's always important to be watchful of optimizations. It is annoying how slow Gnome apps take to load though I very much agree there, but that may be due to pre-loading certain libraries. You could pre-load more, but have higher mem use. Ideally the most commonly used apps should all be pre-loaded though. Windows Explorer, for example, loads instantly. Perhaps "Linux desktops" could just really use some more pre-loading intelligence is all.

    One thing that Windows does is pre-load a lot of things (Windows takes for ages to fully load because of it), and then unloads some of those things if they aren't in use and another app wants more memory. I don't know if Linux tries to do such things, but doing so would probably be ideal and should be the default setting.

    As for the Gnome not being feature-rich, I would have to agree. I love the simplicity of Gnome and hate KDE due to the clutter, but the *options* should still be present, just buried. The default Gnome desktop is barren even when compared to a default Windows XP install, but the same largely goes for KDE as well as far as features, KDE just has more than Gnome does.

    Hell, it's 2010, and there isn't even a decent theming system implemented on Linux desktops for sound, let alone visual appearance. Windows Vista/7 did a good job by having the option for bundling sound and visual appearance all into one selectable theme, yet on Linux you have to install that as root, or copy this there as root and read some stupid installation text file, or install a distro-specific package, or install it from a repository. Come the hell ON, COMMUNICATE, STANDARDS, WHERE the %#@! are they??? Seriously, someone pound FreeDesktop.org for standards until it is overflowing with them so that users can have an easier experience with Linux in ALL areas, THEN we can discuss why it's not the year of the Linux desktop yet.

  6. #26
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    Trolling is not a subtle art; make edgy people blow up with pretty normal reactions/opinions/statements because they are frustrated due to a lack of...

  7. #27
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    @Yfrwlf installing themes is pretty easy in KDE, well if there were that many themes worth to install ...
    Though the sound departement is really a mess if you happen to find the correct setting in systemsettings.

    Btw. most stuff a KDE application needs should be preloaded, since most use kdelibs -- not that much external stuff -- a lot of stuff should be in memory already.

    It is often the programs themselves that are unoptimized and slow down things that way. Just when I profiled KGet I noticed so many -- completly retared -- slowdowns which I fixed mostly. Yet you have to profile and something that looks retarted afterwards might not look that way during implementing it.

    So during my profiling I found also a nasty bug in the caching -- or rather non-caching -- of the icons in kdelibs and it showed me that there are multiple people who don't profile themselves. I suppose this is really a problem in the FOSS world and maybe elsewhere. People not analyzing their code with tools like valgrind, callgrind, xrestop ...
    The same is true with testing, there are testcases which are broken for months and none realizing or talking about that.

    Finally often you can point to distributions but imo in most cases it are the programs which are a collection of hacks which aren't that apparent to the user.

    "Don't look a gift horse in the mouth."

  8. #28
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    Btw. before anyone missinterprets my last post, I doubt that it is different in the Windows or Apple world. I guess a lot of the programs around are just a collection hacks, since that is often easier to do in the short term.

    The difference I see though is that the resources are unequally divided. And in fact the the focus is not completely the same at all places.

  9. #29
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    I come from OS/2 (so I'm showing my age a bit here) and know about Preemptive vs Co-operative multitasking. I know that back at the same time as OS/2, Windows (NT) was using Co-operative Multitasking which explained why it preloaded a lot of stuff (as I understand it. Not an expert ). I have no idea if Win7 is still using this method or which method Linux uses, but back in the day Preemptive was better as far as performance was concerned.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by prophet5 View Post
    I come from OS/2 (so I'm showing my age a bit here) and know about Preemptive vs Co-operative multitasking. I know that back at the same time as OS/2, Windows (NT) was using Co-operative Multitasking which explained why it preloaded a lot of stuff (as I understand it. Not an expert ). I have no idea if Win7 is still using this method or which method Linux uses, but back in the day Preemptive was better as far as performance was concerned.
    Windows NT never used cooperative multi-tasking, only Windows 3.1 and before used cooperative multitasking (although Windows 3.1 could preemptively multitask DOS instances -- treating all Windows programs as belong to a single preemptively multitasked process). All Windowses since 3.1, even including Windows 95, and certainly all of the NT line through Windows 7 and beyond have been preemptive multitaskers.

    Preloading has nothing to do with preemptive vs. cooperative multitasking either. Preloading is an I/O efficiency management issue.

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