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Thread: Valve's Alien Swarm Game For Linux?

  1. #71
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    I don't know if someone has already mentioned it. You may call me a conspiracy theorist and all that, but let me tell you why UT3 never got a Linux version:

    Microsoft pressure.

    UT3 is not a simple game, like many naive Linux users believe. Its engine has been used extensively for many games in consoles and Windows. UT3 sucks as a game, but its engine powers some of the best games of this generation. If Unreal engine 3 were ported to Linux, it would be easy to port those other games too. Especially if a Linux client was available at launch.

    Since Epic and Microsoft have close ties, Epic wouldn't want to make a move against Microsoft. That is why the Linux client was left to die, and eventually cancelled.

    Steam is another thing entirely. It is a distribution platform of games. You may not see it now, but that is where the future is. Downloadable games. Eventually those shiny DVDs you buy will stop getting released, because internet distribution has many benefits for both companies and gamers.

    It makes sense to have a Linux client. If only for the bragging rights of being the only internet platform to deliver universally to all users. Not only for PCs, but for smartphones too. Steam will eventually compete with Apple's store and Microsoft's similar offer.

    It is a matter of time for a Linux port. It make still take many years from now to be officially released, but it WILL come, no matter what. Be patient and look ahead of our times.

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Yes the full game.
    the game is only full with VTF and this do not run on x1950 cards and VTF are a OGL3 feature.

  3. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazetsukai View Post
    The thing here that gets me skeptical is the fact that there is no actual meat in this code. No X11 or GLX calls, nada. Companies like blizzard have had wine 'sandbox detection' present for a while now in games like WoW and StarCraft II (they can detect they're running under wine).

    This code may be a similar sandbox detection routine, so that developers using tech similar to Blizzard's Warren (eg. : punkbuster) wont banhammer Linux users trying to play legitimately.

    Theres one good thing that noone can deny about this code though: They acknowledge that we (Linux gamers) exist, and in number enough to warrant not completely ignoring us (if only in the wine 'sandbox').
    Clearly you are not a developer (or don't know C/C++). The keywords beginning with the hash character such as #define, #if, #ifndef and so on are processed with the preprocessor, which is run at compile time. The only way this code could ever be present in an application is if PLATFORM_LINUX was set, which, given that it is the main entry point of the application, would only be if it were compiled natively for Linux.

    And it would be terrible application design to put any GLX or X11 code in the main function... That would be incredibly difficult to maintain for different platforms...

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    the game is only full with VTF and this do not run on x1950 cards and VTF are a OGL3 feature.
    By your definition then any game that has a choice of graphics API is "not full" when it is not ran with it's highest level API with all eyecandy enabled.

  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by TemplarGR View Post
    I don't know if someone has already mentioned it. You may call me a conspiracy theorist and all that, but let me tell you why UT3 never got a Linux version:

    Microsoft pressure.

    UT3 is not a simple game, like many naive Linux users believe. Its engine has been used extensively for many games in consoles and Windows. UT3 sucks as a game, but its engine powers some of the best games of this generation. If Unreal engine 3 were ported to Linux, it would be easy to port those other games too. Especially if a Linux client was available at launch.

    Since Epic and Microsoft have close ties, Epic wouldn't want to make a move against Microsoft. That is why the Linux client was left to die, and eventually cancelled.

    Steam is another thing entirely. It is a distribution platform of games. You may not see it now, but that is where the future is. Downloadable games. Eventually those shiny DVDs you buy will stop getting released, because internet distribution has many benefits for both companies and gamers.

    It makes sense to have a Linux client. If only for the bragging rights of being the only internet platform to deliver universally to all users. Not only for PCs, but for smartphones too. Steam will eventually compete with Apple's store and Microsoft's similar offer.

    It is a matter of time for a Linux port. It make still take many years from now to be officially released, but it WILL come, no matter what. Be patient and look ahead of our times.

    Oh please adjust your tin foil hat.

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Oh please adjust your tin foil hat.
    I adjust my tin foil hat everyday to counter the new nazi deathray wavelenghts.

    But on a more serious note; what TemplarGR says makes a lot of sense. We need wikileaks on UT3

  7. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueKoala View Post
    UT3 taught me to not rely on what devs say, but rather to make my own assumptions.
    That was NWN for me.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    By your definition then any game that has a choice of graphics API is "not full" when it is not ran with it's highest level API with all eyecandy enabled.
    LOL - from now on, I guess it doesn't count as the 'full' game unless you're running it on a 2560x1600 resolution monitor, because anything less than that doesn't look quite as good. Guess I've never actually run a full game, then.

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by srg_13 View Post
    Clearly you are not a developer (or don't know C/C++). The keywords beginning with the hash character such as #define, #if, #ifndef and so on are processed with the preprocessor, which is run at compile time. The only way this code could ever be present in an application is if PLATFORM_LINUX was set, which, given that it is the main entry point of the application, would only be if it were compiled natively for Linux.

    And it would be terrible application design to put any GLX or X11 code in the main function... That would be incredibly difficult to maintain for different platforms...
    I clearly don't know C/C++ because I realize that all this code does is environment detection. I'm not referring to just THIS code when I say I don't see any of the 'meat' (or veggies if you're a vegitarian) that actually allows for all game functions to run in Linux. I can do platform detection in any programming language, compiled/interpreted/bytecode, but it doesn't necessarily mean that the rest of my code is actually ported. You could put that code at the top of a DirectX application, it wouldn't make it run on Linux.

    Put up or shut up I say. Tidbits and hints are nice, put there's no clear evidence here that anything is actually going to get a port.

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by kazetsukai View Post
    I clearly don't know C/C++ because I realize that all this code does is environment detection. I'm not referring to just THIS code when I say I don't see any of the 'meat' (or veggies if you're a vegitarian) that actually allows for all game functions to run in Linux. I can do platform detection in any programming language, compiled/interpreted/bytecode, but it doesn't necessarily mean that the rest of my code is actually ported. You could put that code at the top of a DirectX application, it wouldn't make it run on Linux.
    Indeed. The big takeaway, however, you should have from the discussion is this: You wouldn't put that sort of code there (as a professional that DOES C/C++ coding and game dev work...) unless there was more meat to it than that. Why have apocryphal code in the PRODUCTION codebase that isn't usable like that, especially in light of version control that could keep the code changes like that internal and wouldn't lose track of them? There's always a risk someone will screw something up and compile problem code in that way otherwise- something someone like Valve, I strongly suspect, is not in the manner of doing.

    Put up or shut up I say. Tidbits and hints are nice, put there's no clear evidence here that anything is actually going to get a port.
    No clear evidence... You won't see that until they choose to divulge more, mainly because the bulk of it is tied up in licensing, NDA, or both. The best you're going to get for a while yet to come is probably just tidbits like that one.

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