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Thread: Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

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  1. #1
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    Default Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Phoronix: Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Next week Intel is set to roll out their much-anticipated "Sandy Bridge" CPUs during the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show. With these 32nm, LGA-1155 next-generation Intel Core processors will also come the Intel P67 Chipset on a whole selection of new motherboards at launch like the ECS P67H2-A2 and ASRock P67 Pro3. How well though will Intel's newest hardware play with Linux?

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15579

  2. #2
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    The Intel Sandy Bridge support though should be all ironed out with a pleasant "out of the box" experience by the time of Ubuntu 11.04, Fedora 14, and other Q2'2011 Linux distributions are released.
    I think you mean Fedora 15.

  3. #3

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    One could have asked if Linux really supports currently available Intel graphics solution. And this depresses me. One active developer? Really? WTF?? Intel earns billions of dollars yearly and has just just one developer? WTF?

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    Damn......

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    Most of the changes are in the kernel and mesa. xf86-video-intel only does 2d acceleration and interface to X, basically.

    3d is in Mesa and in the kernel, modesetting is in the kernel, and Intel is doing quite a bit of work on those.

  6. #6
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    Intel's current high-end chipsets like the Intel X58, P55, and P58. On the motherboard side, the only issues you may experience are with the thermal/voltage/fan sensors not working with LM_Sensors and the kernel drivers at this point, but that is not a big issue to most consumers and the state of the hardware sensor support across most motherboards on Linux is still relatively sad.
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by energyman View Post
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.
    Ran across quite a few over the years. Usually they eventually get implemented some time after introduction.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by energyman View Post
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.
    LM_Sensors still doesn't report voltages and fan speeds for my ages old EP45-DS4 (from experience with other cards, it doesn't support many cards in terms of voltage or fan speeds). LM_Sensors doesn't even reports the temperatures on a Thinkpad T410 (i5 540), which is completely retarded on a laptop.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    LM_Sensors still doesn't report voltages and fan speeds for my ages old EP45-DS4 (from experience with other cards, it doesn't support many cards in terms of voltage or fan speeds). LM_Sensors doesn't even reports the temperatures on a Thinkpad T410 (i5 540), which is completely retarded on a laptop.
    on laptops that is usually done with acpi stuff. Really.

  10. #10
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    Default Ya sure, you betcha

    Quote Originally Posted by energyman View Post
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.
    Maybe the chip is supported, but the motherboard manufacturers adhere to no standard when they hook up the voltage sensor pins. The gain factors are also totally arbitrary. There's no way to tell from the motherboard manual, which pins are hooked up to what. If you try to ask the motherboard company, everyone you talk to says that they don't have access to that kind of information. The sensor values are totally meaningless unless you can sort out all that stuff. You say "supported" and I say "that is meaningless".

    Oh and I have a really nice Pentium III SMP motherboard, it works great and it's quite fast for such an old machine. There is a Linux 2.4 driver for its sensor chip, but not a 2.6 driver.

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