Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 70

Thread: Ubuntu Finds New Love With Qt

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,700

    Default Ubuntu Finds New Love With Qt

    Phoronix: Ubuntu Finds New Love With Qt

    Mark Shuttleworth has announced today on his blog that as part of Ubuntu 11.10 they are looking at expanding their support for the Qt tool-kit. They are looking at now including the Qt libraries as part of their default Ubuntu installation and to include worth while Qt applications...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTAyNQ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    332

    Default

    cant say i disagree.
    qt normally fits better into a gtk environment than the other way around.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    116

    Default

    I think this is great news. I hope this will spark users to be less polarized about GUI toolkits in the future.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    989

    Default

    My only comment here is that including the qt-core and qt-gui libs on the Live CD will be difficult to impossible, without culling more built-in applications. They really need to retire the Live CD concept entirely and go with a Live DVD clocking in around 2GB -- large enough to ship Qt, Gtk, OpenOffice, Gimp, and a whole slew of useful software, but without being so painfully bloated as to just barely fit on a DVD. The bandwidth required to push copies of a full 4.7GB DVD is, after all, more than twice that required for a 2GB DVD image. It's a compromise: goodbye CD-R* media, without killing everyone's capped internet connections too badly.

    As libraries, the kernel, and the base system continue to get larger and more complex, it's becoming harder and harder to meet that 700 MB target. For people who refuse to buy a $20 DVD-RW drive, I say point them to Lubuntu or Xubuntu, which will continue to ship primarily GTK apps based on their respective slimmed-down desktop environments, so I expect these two distros will be able to ship under 700 MB easily for quite some time.

    It's time that the flagship product of "Ubuntu" starts to offer a more robust out of the box install, without sacrificing kernel headers, gcc, or any of the other big bits that people repeatedly want to put on the chopping block. I'm all for Qt by default, but not if it means cutting out more stuff that's been in previous releases. The CD-RW is dead; all hail the DVD-RW!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    3,801

    Default

    The whole of Qt is not more than about 40MB. And for only QtCore and QtGUI, it's less than 15MB.

    I don't think that warrants a 2GB ISO

  6. #6

    Cool

    That's all nice, Qt fanboys now rejoice, now let's solve some real Linux problems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    My only comment here is that including the qt-core and qt-gui libs on the Live CD will be difficult to impossible...
    Replace tomboy with gnote and throw away gbrainy and the mono runtime and all its dependencies. There, space problem pretty much solved.

    ps: Those (few) who think they absolutely need tomboy and can't live with gnote can install it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cl333r View Post
    Replace tomboy with gnote and throw away gbrainy and the mono runtime and all its dependencies. There, space problem pretty much solved.
    That would be perfect, if some idiot hadn't chosen to replace rhythmbox with banshee...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    I've found the CD size distribution always a plus point, and am not particularly fond of this mixing of different toolkits. Keep in mind that this is not just CD/disk space we're talking about, but the extra toolkit libraries also need to be loaded in memory when running applications using these toolkits. May not be an issue on modern desktop systems, but might be on low end netbooks.

    But the bigger issue for me is consistency, one thing I have always liked about GNOME is the minimalistic UI that doesn't get in the way. Developers of Qt apps on the other hand seem to more follow the Microsoft Windows philosophy, with cluttered UIs and too many options.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    116

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monraaf View Post
    But the bigger issue for me is consistency, one thing I have always liked about GNOME is the minimalistic UI that doesn't get in the way. Developers of Qt apps on the other hand seem to more follow the Microsoft Windows philosophy, with cluttered UIs and too many options.
    I'm assuming Canonical will be taking this into account when choosing applications. That said, I don't completely agree with you. There are plenty of Qt applications with a minimal UI.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •