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Thread: How to help / support Linux ? - your idea's

  1. #41
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    The Greatest Text Editor Of Them All.
    Hidden reference to notepad++ detected. :P

  2. #42
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    Funny thing is about his rant is that he uses an operating system called "Haiku". By his standards I guess we should assume that it is Japanese poetry software instead of an attempt to revive an old failed operating system called Be.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    Hidden reference to notepad++ detected. :P
    Notepad++.... must mean I can open it up twice or something.

  4. #44

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    How to help / support Linux ?
    Contact with your hardware manufacturer every time when you have any sort of problem with hardware in Linux and ask for proper Linux support.

  5. #45
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    @Thatguy

    I had to register to make this post because you are either horribly misinformed or a troll. On the topic of "unifying" distros or ui toolkits, you are essentially saying someone should force developers to work on what you want rather than what they want. I wish you the best of luck convincing anyone to do that.

    As far as "jamming everything into the kernel" and system responsiveness goes... The kernel is the best place to have hardware related software, simply so there is less overhead. I'm not sure how your system is configured but mine runs a lot smoother on Ubuntu 10.10 than it does on Windows 7, so I don't think performance is an issue.

    You say that most average users don't want to deal with Linux because it is unpolished, but that claim is ridiculous. My own mother began using it just fine, and she didn't even know where the power button on her computer was then. Face the facts, once a user understands concepts like folders, files, and browsers, any modern day GUI is interchangeable. And somehow in this day and age you are talking about typing commands in a terminal. What would an average user need to do that for?

    The reason Linux market share is low compared to Windows (and to some extent OSX) is because it isn't preinstalled on OEM systems with everything configured like the other two. If people had to install Windows themselves I guarantee no average person would be using a computer. They would give up while trying to get drivers for everything.

    And the reason OEMs aren't moving to Linux has nothing to do with performance or usability anymore, it's because they are bribed with low cost Windows volume licenses. If they try to provide alternatives Microsoft just has to threaten to raise the price of their product and they cave. Why do you think Dell keeps their Ubuntu based offerings off the main page of their site? If they thought Ubuntu wasn't any good they wouldn't have offered it at all. And OSX would probably have a lower install base than Linux if it were purchased without hardware. The only reason people know it exists is because they buy Macs that come with it.

    In most ways concerning the users Mac OSX and Ms Windows are vastly technically superior to linux.
    Name one.

    Ubuntu is likely one of the best versions of linux out, yet it has problems with abi and api. To many tool chains kit etc.
    What are those problems? Do you even know? Or are you just repeating random bits of things you've heard about Linux over the years but never truly understood. If you can explain yourself I'll take that back but I really don't think you know much about Linux besides what you remember when you tried it in 2002.

    Sorry for being offtopic

    I would recommend getting involved in the community through bug reports, writing software, or maybe teaching people how it works by writing guides or maintaining a website/blog related to it. Contributing financially to a project might help some but I don't think it is nearly as important as being involved socially.

  6. #46
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    I do not fully get the coincidence between stable drivers and open source drivers. I had several ati cards which had several problems with open source drivers. Even with open specs it does not mean that everything works. It is more a psychological aspect that somebody prefers open source.
    I guarantee it is a psychological thing, in that, when I use open source software it typically does what I expect, and because of that my brain begins to associate the term with things that are positive. I haven't had any problems at all with the open source ati drivers, whereas I just tried the latest catalyst release and I am still getting strange graphical corruption issues. The only negative I've experienced is a lack of support for my brand new 6800 series card, but I expect the driver to perform admirably once the support is finished.

    I strongly believe that people working together in a community to solve problems do a better job supporting end users than corporations who tend to listen to their largest customers (other large corporations) instead. I don't use any proprietary software, but not out of principle. My favorite software just happens to be open source. (though we could use some more good games, I can only play wesnoth so many times )

  7. #47
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    Default Just try to be sure.

    We can simply test "donation" approach.
    I propose to choose some abandoned by devs hardware, which can be used by people accidentally and write for it driver.
    It could be Riva128 for example. The task will be relatively simple, merging code from nv driver to nouveau framework and write what is missing for full hardware support.
    Do Phoronix site can deliver donation platform with some advertisement?
    The question is how much money we need collect for this or different idea. Riva128 in nouveau is worth 400$ for example?
    I'm isn't good in English, sorry for my mistakes.

  8. #48
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    Jan 2011
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    Default Just try to be sure.

    We can simply test "donation" approach.
    I propose to choose some abandoned by devs hardware, which can be used by people accidentally and write for it driver.
    It could be Riva128 for example. The task will be relatively simple, merging code from nv driver to nouveau framework and write what is missing for full hardware support.
    Do Phoronix site can deliver donation platform with some advertisement?
    The question is how much money we need collect for this or different idea. Riva128 in nouveau is worth 400$ for example?
    I'm isn't good in English, sorry for my mistakes.

  9. #49
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    $400 is a real low ball amount for something like that, multiply that 4 - 5x before someone even remotely qualified even considers looking into it to see what is involved. Our company has put out relatively simple bounties in the past to it's opensource project (I'm talking much simpler stuff such as adding spell checking capability) and those didn't even get a hit until they were $500.

  10. #50
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    There are two things that can help.

    1. Feedback - the easiest one. What can you do? Well if you're not a developer or your knowledge just don't allow you to fix it, you should report it. Take that ten minutes, read the HOW TO POST BUG REPORTS, which most developers supply (or just ask someone) and REPORT. A lot of bugs get ignored (or shoved under the carpet) because there is no user interest.

    2. Money - The hard one. You can donate of course but that doesn't solve the problem. What open source community really needs is a One Dollar License. To put it bluntly users should be required to pay a minimum of one dollar a year (or if the can more but the one dollar is a minimum) to the Free Rights Management Foundation That would one in a year distribute the gathered recurses to the software developers based on the popularity of the software.

    So:
    1. Developers register with The foundation that they use the License.
    2. Users buy the license from the foundation, and receive a license key.
    3. Installed applet check the software installed on a mashing and uploads statistics (only the software protected by the license is counted, other is ignored.)
    4. Once year the numbers are crunched and the money is allocated respectively.
    5. The money should be divided in 3 categories 20% for Linux distributions, 30% Drivers, 50% Software. (Within those categories money divide is based on the popularity.)
    6. Since companies usually can pay more The licence fee should be divided:
    Home users $1+ / for all.
    Enterprise $1+ / for every 10-15 workstations.

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