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Thread: Unigine OilRush Barely Does 800 Sales To Date

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    An RTS doesn't need pretty graphics. If anything, overly pretty graphics make the game worse, and you really want a strategy game to focus on information efficiency rather than realistic visuals
    I respectfully disagree. Visuals are the item that slaps a gamer in the face enticing them for more.

    (there's a reason that tactical displays for ships and fighter jets still use simple dots and arrows and vectors rather than realistic 3D rendering despite the technology being available for many years).
    That is a very different situation. Tactical displays there are to display the maximum amount of pertinent information without distraction because realtime scenarios need realtime decisions that determines real peoples survival. War and defense are not, and never should be about eye candy and amusement. That being said, tactical displays may not have eyecandy but real life provides that naturally in the environment that they are used. The eyecandy in a RTS often is in HUD form and is minimalist as well. The eye candy is usually reserved for displaying the environment where the theater of combat is taking place. Modern flight simulators for aircraft even have some pretty nice eyecandy and that is separate from the HUD.

  2. #42
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    Only 700 Linux preorders...

    At first I though that maybe it was because the readership of Phoronix amounted to only that much, then I read the comments in this thread.

    It's completely out to lunch to see so many self proclaimed Linux gamers (they sound more like Windows gamers, but anyway) offer so many rationalizations on why they can't find 20 bucks to support a company that has done more for Linux gaming than any I can think of.

    Unigine has released all their benchmarks for Linux, when others just keep to DirectX and Windows. That doesn't come cheap. They've also got a solid track record for updates and supporting the Linux ecosystem - which is impressive considering how their engine can stress a system, and how Linux hasn't been stressed anywhere as much before. That's a far better track record than any indie I can think of - they release a world respected professional engine, and they do it in a way no other indie would even be able to dream of.

    They've also offered their engine to promising indie developpers, on the condition they release a Linux version of their game.

    Basically, even if the game beta wasn't offered with the preorder, that would still be enough to warrant supporting them - Oil Rush aside, they've already done far more to support Linux gaming than your 20$ could ever buy.

    However, it's not all. The game runs beautifully at this time of development, and while they need to add content, it's not the hard part now - considering they have something solid at this time, and their track record of technical expertise, trusting them to add more maps is a no brainer.

    At 20$, the game is also really well priced for a tower defense game. Tower defense is a really popular genre those days, so they're targeting some of the largest user base they could get with a game this price. Other tower defense games are similarly priced, yet their graphics don't hold a candle to Oil Rush, and Oil Rush gameplay is also deeper. It's an incredible deal.

    It's also not only a day one Linux support, but prerelease and beta support as well. Most indie only target Windows, then port to Linux, so in the best case you don't have much access to the beta, in the worst you're waiting a few months after release for the Linux port.

    We don't have much games running on Linux because the Linux market is the worst you could target, and I'm afraid Unigine is realising that, along with any indie or big brand developer who would have the curiosity to read shame of a thread. Look at the Mac market, even when they didn't have much they kept buying games and supporting what they had, though the ports were a disgrace and the games niche games they weren't interested in. The X3: Reunion Mac port is a joke (not even a port, more like the Windows game running through a subpar wrapper) and was priced more than the X3 native Linux port from LGP, yet it was received far better than all the slack the Linux port got from being more expensive than bargain-bin Windows games.

    When you're buying a renowned game that already brought more than a million dollars to its developers (Minecraft), you're not supporting Linux gaming, you're just getting what you want, like any other customer. When you're buying the HIB for more than what Windows gamers paid for, you aren't supporting Linux gaming - you're getting a bargain, since even if you're only going to try one of those games a few hours, you're already getting your 15$ worth.

    Oil Rush is more like a bargain for all you got in return (the engines benchmarks on Linux, the gift of this engine for other Linux indie game teams, and the game itself, which is already hinting at something better than most of the other 20$ tower defence games). And it's like what, two movie tickets, or a half-decent meal at a restaurant?

    Maybe you can't part with the money, because your conscience tells you so. So what? Does it mean you have to be a prick, and backstab a game you haven't even seriously tried? Unigine is doing right all the things you guys used before as excuse for not supporting previous Linux native games - day one Linux support (better actually), same price as on Windows, and similar price to other games in the competition (better price actually if you consider you get a deeper gameplay and far superior graphics). From a company that has already done more to support Linux than we Linux gamers could have ever dreamt of.

  3. #43
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    Default mostly a marketing issue

    I agree that this game's low sales are mostly due to the lack of marketing for the game. I also think "Oil Rush" isn't a very good name (but this falls under marketing).

    With good marketing, you'd see a lot more sales, but this isn't exactly a top tier game (even if the engine itself is top tier) so don't expect to make $100 million.

    The game certainly doesn't play how I expected, and I was disappointed that it's a simplified version of an RTS, but after I put more time into it I started to have fun with it. Unfortunately, it was very crashy (I'll try deleting the cfg tonight and see if that helps). This game may potentially be very fun, but I won't be able to tell for sure until I can play a game without it crashing every few minutes (interesting the tutorial levels have never crashed on me, and I don't *remember* the tower defense level crashing on me).

    The nice thing about this game being a simplified RTS is that perhaps some casual gamers can get into it (I think this is the intention of the devs in fact). I'll see if I can't get my sister to play. If she likes it, i'll buy her a copy.

    Will the final release of this game have a real campaign (I'm sure this has been addressed before, but I haven't seen the answer yet personally)? Someone suggested allowing you to select multiple platforms in the minimap, I think this would be a tremendous improvement.

    Any chance PS3 players could play with PC players? I'm guessing no, but it would be pretty cool...

  4. #44
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    I pre-ordered on the day it was available. My thoughts on my experience so far:

    - installs very easily. Just run the installer and it'll self-extract into a directory in the same place as where you ran the installer from. You can move this directory anywhere you want or leave it there

    - runs very easily: I started the 1920x1200 full screen launcher and was in the game right away

    - looks fantastic: graphics are gorgeous all over the place, runs smoothly on my HD5750 with default graphic options and Catalyst 11.2. Had some minor graphic glitches once in a while, but nothing worse than I've experienced in other game in Windows

    - runs reliably: I know some people mentioned crashing, but I didn't experience that at all. For me, it just ran perfectly for over an hour

    - controls work well enough once you learn them

    A couple of other points worth mentioning:

    - $19.95 is a good price for a game like this
    - requirement for commercial drivers sucks, but that's a Linux problem and not a Unigine one
    - forcing people to buy two licenses to play on Linux and Windows sucks
    - the marketing behind this game is abysmal, if I didn't read Phoronix, I wouldn't know it exists
    - OilRush is a stupid name. Instantly reminds me of "Oil Panic":


  5. #45
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    Sales are probably so low because real RTS enthusiasts play C&C, TotalAnnihilation or Spring.

    Ah, the good old days when I played C&C until the map was filled with silos then captured the last building, only to be thrust into the next battle with 12 soldiers, an APC, and a hummer. I don't think I ever actually beat that game (the first one), 'though I did get pretty far.

    All seriousness aside, the graphics of OilRush are pretty good, and if it's anything like Total Annihilation I might consider getting it. OTOH, if it's like Starcraft I probably won't get it. I just never got into that game.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    Only 700 Linux preorders...

    At first I though that maybe it was because the readership of Phoronix amounted to only that much, then I read the comments in this thread.

    It's completely out to lunch to see so many self proclaimed Linux gamers (they sound more like Windows gamers, but anyway) offer so many rationalizations on why they can't find 20 bucks to support a company that has done more for Linux gaming than any I can think of.

    Unigine has released all their benchmarks for Linux, when others just keep to DirectX and Windows. That doesn't come cheap. They've also got a solid track record for updates and supporting the Linux ecosystem - which is impressive considering how their engine can stress a system, and how Linux hasn't been stressed anywhere as much before. That's a far better track record than any indie I can think of - they release a world respected professional engine, and they do it in a way no other indie would even be able to dream of.

    They've also offered their engine to promising indie developpers, on the condition they release a Linux version of their game.

    Basically, even if the game beta wasn't offered with the preorder, that would still be enough to warrant supporting them - Oil Rush aside, they've already done far more to support Linux gaming than your 20$ could ever buy.

    However, it's not all. The game runs beautifully at this time of development, and while they need to add content, it's not the hard part now - considering they have something solid at this time, and their track record of technical expertise, trusting them to add more maps is a no brainer.

    At 20$, the game is also really well priced for a tower defense game. Tower defense is a really popular genre those days, so they're targeting some of the largest user base they could get with a game this price. Other tower defense games are similarly priced, yet their graphics don't hold a candle to Oil Rush, and Oil Rush gameplay is also deeper. It's an incredible deal.

    It's also not only a day one Linux support, but prerelease and beta support as well. Most indie only target Windows, then port to Linux, so in the best case you don't have much access to the beta, in the worst you're waiting a few months after release for the Linux port.

    We don't have much games running on Linux because the Linux market is the worst you could target, and I'm afraid Unigine is realising that, along with any indie or big brand developer who would have the curiosity to read shame of a thread. Look at the Mac market, even when they didn't have much they kept buying games and supporting what they had, though the ports were a disgrace and the games niche games they weren't interested in. The X3: Reunion Mac port is a joke (not even a port, more like the Windows game running through a subpar wrapper) and was priced more than the X3 native Linux port from LGP, yet it was received far better than all the slack the Linux port got from being more expensive than bargain-bin Windows games.

    When you're buying a renowned game that already brought more than a million dollars to its developers (Minecraft), you're not supporting Linux gaming, you're just getting what you want, like any other customer. When you're buying the HIB for more than what Windows gamers paid for, you aren't supporting Linux gaming - you're getting a bargain, since even if you're only going to try one of those games a few hours, you're already getting your 15$ worth.

    Oil Rush is more like a bargain for all you got in return (the engines benchmarks on Linux, the gift of this engine for other Linux indie game teams, and the game itself, which is already hinting at something better than most of the other 20$ tower defence games). And it's like what, two movie tickets, or a half-decent meal at a restaurant?

    Maybe you can't part with the money, because your conscience tells you so. So what? Does it mean you have to be a prick, and backstab a game you haven't even seriously tried? Unigine is doing right all the things you guys used before as excuse for not supporting previous Linux native games - day one Linux support (better actually), same price as on Windows, and similar price to other games in the competition (better price actually if you consider you get a deeper gameplay and far superior graphics). From a company that has already done more to support Linux than we Linux gamers could have ever dreamt of.
    Actually I doubt I've ever asked for crappy games for Linux, what I(and I guess most of the other people you're talking about) complained about was that top tier games weren't made for Linux too, that's all. The solution to that is to make a top tier game for Linux too, period. Otherwise I'm simply gonna keep my Windows partition that I never use except for games. That said, I wish the best to their game engine, it's hopefully very good and they'll find a great market for it, sure I hope so!

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    It's completely out to lunch to see so many self proclaimed Linux gamers (they sound more like Windows gamers, but anyway) offer so many rationalizations on why they can't find 20 bucks to support a company that has done more for Linux gaming than any I can think of.
    Like it or not, being a "game on linux" is not the only factor that falls into play when purchasing product. People still have to determine if it would be a game that they would play. Please don't think that just because something is on linux that it deserves to have a "linux church collection" of peoples money. The majority of people out there don't buy games because it runs on their platform of choice, it is quite the opposite. They use a platform that offers the software they would like to run. The bottom realistic line is that most people pay for software that they think they will enjoy or use first then secondly they then look if they have a platform that they can run it on.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    Only 700 Linux preorders...

    When you're buying a renowned game that already brought more than a million dollars to its developers (Minecraft), you're not supporting Linux gaming, you're just getting what you want, like any other customer.
    Well, why shouldn't I get what I want? This argument is really bad. If I bought a game that was released for Linux, this does support Linux gaming. Or is your definition of support to buy whatever is released for Linux whether one actually wants it or not?

    This is a business offer and the folks at Unigine most certainly want me (and whoever they can get) as a customer. Realize that they are making this game (and their most AWESOME engine) for multiple platforms. They didn't develop Linux support out of some sense of philanthropy. They hope to sell licenses, and cross platform compatibility sweetens the deal. Oil Rush is pretty. It's just not my thing. I don't own copies of Civilization or Starcraft either.

    When you're buying the HIB for more than what Windows gamers paid for, you aren't supporting Linux gaming - you're getting a bargain, since even if you're only going to try one of those games a few hours, you're already getting your 15$ worth.
    You have an interesting definition of "support." Consequently, I would appreciate you getting out of my wallet. You have no idea what I paid for the HIB. I believe your statements say more about your own habits than they do mine.

    Does it mean you have to be a prick, and backstab a game you haven't even seriously tried?
    What part of "I don't like this kind of game, and should not be guilt-tripped into buying it" did you miss? This wasn't about the game not being done or being done poorly (Although several people in the comments section gave me that impression of the current build.) I take issue with "Boo hoo, they haz only sold 800 preorder in a week" appeal to pity.

  9. #49
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    Cool Just a few words ...

    What about http://www.desura.com/ for 'Oil Rush'?

    They say on there page:
    "The Desura client currently only works on Windows PCs. We are working on support for Mac and Linux. To be notified when support is added, please provide your email:"
    So they will (hopefully) faster be ready for Linux (and Mac) as Steam (and co.).

    Could be a good platform.
    It also has mod- and development-sections. Good for modding 'Oil Rush'.

    ----

    Just want to say, that Unigine is not a small fish anymore. Heaven is part on many benchmark-tours. People know what their engine is capable of.

    Also many games don't give demos. But people are buying.
    Their are some big drm-dongles on some games -- and people are buying them.

    This game has no direct demo. But I would say that Heaven would be a good indicator for seeing if the actual game could run on ones own platform.
    This game has also no drm and (what was a big point for me, and it seems many other) it has a linux-version. Also I hope that the mod-sdk will be good and allows also to make a total conversion because this is far the best engine now with linux-support. (The mod-sdk will come with the game-release ? Or are there chances to see it earlier ?)

    One buy and get all versions ? Windows - Linux - Mac - Android - PS3 ?
    No. It would be nice to have Win and Lin version with a onetimebuy.
    But hey - its "just" 14,33 / 19,95$.
    The people from Overgrowth want 29,95$ for PreOrder. I got Lugaru HD and played it. Was fun. Overgrowth will definitely be interesting.
    So, 'Oil Rush' have a better engine. Should they also take 29,95$ ? Maybe a bit more ? Around 39,95$ ? Maybe for that amount they could give you a Win and Lin version. But would you buy it ? Why then not buy a Win and a Lin version ?
    But why should you buy two versions? Test with Heaven what should be better for you. Phoronix often showed that the Unigine-engine is nearly the same on both os.

    --

    It's just like with the HumbleIndiBundle.
    People get what they buy. Adding free features afterwards makes them angry. That's so odd. I got the first and later the second. Told a friend and he bought the second. Then came the free gifts and I wasn't angry to get something for free - I was happy for my friend because he missed the first bundle.
    Just be happy with what you payed for -- be even more happy if you get something for free.
    Just be happy.

    In this case: There are games from especially LGP which just work on linux. No windows version included. You can go out in shops and buy games and get just the windows-version even if on steam you could get the mac-version too. You can't claim something someone else does for everything.

    Now you can get some Sega-games from steam but you can't demand that they should work on a real sega-console.

    Steam will be on PS3 - so maybe they also bundle a bigger box so that you buy once and play on mac, win and ps3. Would you claim that for all games from that on ?

    Get a Linux distribution, install it. You will see lots of apps.
    Why do you don't claim the same happening on Windows?

    Jeah, I bought Penumbra-Collection for Linux and played it on Linux. No problems and i was happy with it. Same thing with Amnesia. Bought the pre-order-linux one and got as gift the windows-version but just played the linux version.

    Don't see linux as another windows.
    Try to see a pc with linux a different machine as a pc with windows.
    A xbox, ps3, wii -- all are just regular (some even crappy) pcs. You can install linux or what the heck else. But you buy games for all these consoles.
    So just try to think of linux as another console.

    (Hole thing said with onlive and gaikai in mind there will be a grey zone where all pcs will eventually get together and you in some future just buy one game and play it everywhere.)

    ----

    Just to ask:
    wouldn't it be nice to have a Unigine Development Kit for free for non-commercial developments? Like they do with CryEngine and UnrealEngine. (No ? Maybe just for the non-commercial-linux-devs? Because they can't easily use Cry- or UnrealEngine ...)
    This could also push Unigine and the Linux-Gaming-Market.

    ----

    Anybody thought about a live-game-disc/usb/ssd ?
    Just put a minimalistic linux-distro on the disc with e.g. the oil-rush game.
    Putting that into the pc
    -> starting the pc
    -> starting the live-disc and with that
    -> starting oil-rush
    ( like on good old consoles (put cartridge in - start - play)).
    No install - just play.
    ... good old times ...
    ^^

    ----

    Ooh, a new game.
    Do not expect anything.
    Do expect nothing at all.
    Just play it with absolutely no comparison in mind.
    Just play it like it would be your first game ever.
    Get amazed.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    Maybe you can't part with the money, because your conscience tells you so. So what? Does it mean you have to be a prick, and backstab a game you haven't even seriously tried?
    I was considering pre-ordering, but now I think I am going to not pre-order the game just out of sheer spite for that whiny rant.

    Do you really believe peer-pressure will increase pre-orders of a game that won't be released until at least June?

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