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Thread: ASRock 775Dual-VSTA Motherboard

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    1

    Default

    Just to save people the hassle of using old IDE drives, here's the way I got SATA to work unmodified:

    Enter BIOS: Set the SATA controller to NON-RAID

    When the install CD is booting, specify:
    linux install all-generic-ide
    The 'all-generic-ide' portion is the winner. Basically the kernel sees the PATA device controller, but it doesn't recognize it. By adding the extra kernel option, the kernel forcefully makes the SATA controller a generic PATA device. It should properly find any SATA hard-drives you may have plugged in.

    PS: Having no end of troubles with FC6T3-x86_64. I'm reverting to 32bit in the hope that it'll fix my woes...

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2

    Default dodgey pc...

    can someone PLEASE help!!

    Whenever my pc feels like it, it will start running unbelievably slow like all system resources are used up, and framerate in games like fear will drop from 130 to 30. it's driving me crazy. at first i thought it was faulty ram but i tested different ram and it still happens. Has anyone had this problem before? i really need help on this 1.

    My specs are: this mobo, conroe e6400, 6800 gs agp 512, and 2xddr266 512mb

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jazza711 View Post
    can someone PLEASE help!!

    Whenever my pc feels like it, it will start running unbelievably slow like all system resources are used up, and framerate in games like fear will drop from 130 to 30. it's driving me crazy. at first i thought it was faulty ram but i tested different ram and it still happens. Has anyone had this problem before? i really need help on this 1.

    My specs are: this mobo, conroe e6400, 6800 gs agp 512, and 2xddr266 512mb
    What Linux distribution and kernel are you using?

    Do you have Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology enabled in the BIOS? (perhaps a problem with your software configuration where it's having problems changing frequencies)

    This probably isn't causing your issues directly, but DDR-266 with a Conroe isn't a good match. The Conroe Core 2 Duos fair well with DDR2-667/800, and this is the first time ever I have heard someone using DDR-266 with a Conroe.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    2

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    umm... i use windows xp sp2. speedstep is set to 'auto' and i don't think it's software because it's happened right after os install. i'm planning on upgrading my ram to ddr2/667 next week but i don't want to upgrade it if there's a problem with other hardware.

  5. #15

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    Had you tried updating the BIOS? Or changing any other BIOS options?

    Unless it's the software you're running (since it is Windows) or BIOS, it may be the memory then. This is the first time hearing anyone use DDR-266 memory with a Core 2 Duo.

    You may want to run memtest86+ for kicks and see what happens.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    36

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    Here you guys are again, fighting with another ASRock product. My own experience with this manufacturer's products has not really been what I would call pleasant. I tried on and off for almost three months to get Linux installed on not one, but TWO ASRock 939 Dual SATA2 boards (See the thread "Linux is a no-go on my system").

    I know, this isn't helping the OP, but I think having to connect/disconnect COMMON hardware or mess around in the BIOS just to install an OS is ludicrous, especially with a modern distro. I understand the phoronix guys want to test as many motherboards as possible with Linux, but at some point you just have to draw a line in the sand and label crap for what it really is. Here - I'll help you - just copy/paste the following text to the front page, and I hereby publish this statement in the public domain so you guys can use it whenever you want to:

    "Avoid ASRock motherboards when installing Linux - they're crap."

    I finally dumped my Dual SATA2 with an EPoX (nForce4 Ultra chipset since I'm using an AMD CPU) and haven't looked back - no special BIOS settings, no disconnecting SATA drives, no turning off USB 2.0 support - none of that crap. I recommend that you guys do the same. Find a compatible motherboard.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsimmons View Post
    Here you guys are again, fighting with another ASRock product. My own experience with this manufacturer's products has not really been what I would call pleasant. I tried on and off for almost three months to get Linux installed on not one, but TWO ASRock 939 Dual SATA2 boards (See the thread "Linux is a no-go on my system").

    I know, this isn't helping the OP, but I think having to connect/disconnect COMMON hardware or mess around in the BIOS just to install an OS is ludicrous, especially with a modern distro. I understand the phoronix guys want to test as many motherboards as possible with Linux, but at some point you just have to draw a line in the sand and label crap for what it really is. Here - I'll help you - just copy/paste the following text to the front page, and I hereby publish this statement in the public domain so you guys can use it whenever you want to:

    "Avoid ASRock motherboards when installing Linux - they're crap."

    I finally dumped my Dual SATA2 with an EPoX (nForce4 Ultra chipset since I'm using an AMD CPU) and haven't looked back - no special BIOS settings, no disconnecting SATA drives, no turning off USB 2.0 support - none of that crap. I recommend that you guys do the same. Find a compatible motherboard.
    Sorry, but seeing that you have extrem problems with this one kind of board does not prove that *all* AsRock boards are problematic. I am now running my Gentoo System on an AsRock ConRoe865PE for a month and I had no problems at all. All components on the board were directly included in the kernel, I only had to recompile it once. I could go on using my old System without *any* problem. The only thing not working yet is the thermal sensor inside the core2duo I am using. But this is not AsRocks fault, it is simply not yet included in the Vanilla kernel.
    In short: No special BIOS settings needed, nothing to worry about. Everything did run fine starting with an 2.6.18 kernel. SATA Drive works, USB2.0 works, monitoring works, lan works, ... In short: This motherboard is fully compatible with Linux and I can only recommend it.

    The only bad things about the board are the BIOS itself and the placement of the floppy connector:
    1) The BIOS has almost no options. This board is not to be recommended if you want to tweak settings and overclock. Since I don't overclock, no problem for me.
    2) The floppy position at the buttom of the board is really bad. You do need very long cables to attach a floppy since you normally have to cross the whole board.
    3) Okay, there is another problem: There are only two headers for fans. But this is not really a big problem, compared to the really low price of about 50.

    Positive about this board:
    1) It's cheap price.
    2) Supports AGP graphics cards. The good old r300 cards are mainly agp cards. A good way to have open drivers for graphics together with a DVI display.
    3) Supports DDR1 ram. This ram still is about as fast as DDR2 ram and you can take it over from your old system.
    4) No active cooling devices onboard. This results in a rather silent system, no 40mm fans that start to get really loud after 1 year.
    5) The board is rock solid and works nicely for 24/7 usage.
    6) All onboard devices (sound not tested) work nicely with linux, no problems so far.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I recognize that some folks have success with these boards, but I tried TWO (thinking the first one may be a bit flaky somehow), and could not get any distro installed and/or bootable. I went through the same song and dance as is being suggested here - try disconnecting this, try disabling that, try flashing your bios to something older/newer... Hogwash. I want to install Linux and get some freakin work done, not fiddle around with hardware incompatibilities.

    Sure, ASRock boards may be fine in Windows, but with Linux, they are (in my oh-so-humble opinion) crap. I have 3 months of experience trying to install Linux on them on which to base my claim. I'll never buy another one, and frankly, this has turned me off to ASUS as well since they're the ones inflicting these boards on us.

    Given the spotty success people have with ASRock boards, I would not recommend them for use with Linux (and really, it's okay to say that - better to be truthful than to say "Hmmm, we didn't have any problems."). At the same time, it's important to invite ASROCK to keep trying, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't tell them they've screwed the pooch when we're ankle-deep in new puppies.

    To summarize - current ASRock compatibility status - CRAP.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    351

    Default

    i own a ASRock 939Dual-SATA2 and it works fine in Linux ( Zenwalk 4.0/2.6.18.1 )

  10. #20

    Default ASRock 775Dual-VSTA

    ...The Linux 2.6.18 kernel does address several of the problems with this motherboard, but we still had experienced oddities during our testing with Fedora Core 6. This Intel LGA-775 motherboard is targeted towards compatibility with Microsoft Vista, so Windows users should be in the clear of any compatibility problems. Upon Linux better supporting this Chipset and motherboard we will pass along word in this article as well as on the Phoronix Forums. While this motherboard may be a Linux lemon, all hope is not lost for this budget manufacturer based upon our experiences with their motherboards in the past...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=8243

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