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Thread: Wayland, X.Org For Ubuntu's Future

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  1. #1
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    Default Wayland, X.Org For Ubuntu's Future

    Phoronix: Wayland, X.Org For Ubuntu's Future

    Wayland was talked about this morning at the summit in Budapest. In particular, the outlook for Wayland in Ubuntu and Linaro. Separately, there's also X.Org notes from today's meetings...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTQyOA

  2. #2
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    all this is nice but what i don't see is Canonical (or anyone else for the matter) putting resources in Wayland.

    it's not going to write itself and there are very few people hacking on it at the moment (despite the big amount of people flaming/trolling in the mailing list)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    it's not going to write itself

  4. #4
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    Default Sucks

    So my i8xx hardware is officially stuck on fbdev or svga drivers?

    I was under the impression Intel was working on a fix for the instability issues.

    Kinda sucks since the laptop in question (Dell 700m, pentium m 1.7GHz, 5 hours battery life) still works really well otherwise.

    Before the whole rewrite of Intel's driver (EXA), it was rock solid and stable with Compiz.

    Oh well... I guess linux is better for moving foward with X, even if it breaks old stuff.

  5. #5
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    So my i8xx hardware is officially stuck on fbdev or svga drivers?
    Your ancient i8xx had barely functional 3D drivers when it was new.... in Windows.

    It sucked when it was new and, guess what, it still sucks now.

    Before the whole rewrite of Intel's driver (EXA), it was rock solid and stable with Compiz.
    Somehow I sincerely doubt that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Your ancient i8xx had barely functional 3D drivers when it was new.... in Windows.

    It sucked when it was new and, guess what, it still sucks now.



    Somehow I sincerely doubt that.
    Well I can assure you it ran Compiz fine (60 fps for most effects), Unreal Tournament, Google Earth, and other old school OpenGL programs.


    This was back when the 8xx and 9xx line of GPUs were still new and receiving new features in the drivers. The machine is about 7 years old now. There was plenty of time for the driver to mature in Linux.

    In Windows it's been so long I have forgotten if I ever ran a 3D app on it.

    The driver broke when the EXA rewrite began. KMS was the final nail in the coffin that made it unstable.

    Unfortunately, non KMS, non EXA is deprecated now. I would have to use a very old software stack to get stability back.

    Here's an old 2007 screenshot from that system:

    http://ordorica.org/misc/beryl.png

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hechacker1 View Post
    So my i8xx hardware is officially stuck on fbdev or svga drivers?

    I was under the impression Intel was working on a fix for the instability issues.

    Kinda sucks since the laptop in question (Dell 700m, pentium m 1.7GHz, 5 hours battery life) still works really well otherwise.

    Before the whole rewrite of Intel's driver (EXA), it was rock solid and stable with Compiz.

    Oh well... I guess linux is better for moving foward with X, even if it breaks old stuff.
    the answer is simple... don't buy intel again.

    if some of your doing hurt you... don't do it again

    next time buy via or maybe nvidia... or maybe amd/ati?

    i think intel pawn you with that bad stuff: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel740

    "The AGP Texture concept soon proved to be a tremendous error in design, because the card had to constantly access the textures over a channel that was upwards of eight times slower than RAM placed on the graphics card itself. Although AGP did indeed improve performance of moving geometry, this was wiped away by the growing use of textures, which were much larger. In real-world use it proved to be much slower than existing solutions like the Voodoo2, and was only able to hold its own with slower 2D/3D cards like the Nvidia RIVA 128. "


    Intel's concept soon proved to be a tremendous ''''''''error in design'''''

    Intel=ERROR IN DESIGN...


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    Intel's concept soon proved to be a tremendous ''''''''error in design'''''
    You're assuming that the 740 was supposed to be a good graphics chip, rather than an attempt to push the AGP bus into more PCs.

    Everyone I knew in the 3D hardware business laughed at Intel when they said they were going to put all their textures in AGP memory, because we knew what a performance hit they'd take. So it's not like this was a secret that they only discovered after making the chip, anyone with half a clue could see it was a braindead design if you wanted good 3D performance.

    Did AMD even have AGP at that point? If Intel had a cheap 3D card because it didn't need much memory, and it required AGP so it couldn't be paired with non-Intel CPUs (if that was the case, i don't remember when non-Intel motherboards got AGP) then it could still be a win for the business even if it was lousy for games.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hechacker1 View Post
    Oh well... I guess linux is better for moving foward with X, even if it breaks old stuff.
    I spent a while writing Windows 95/98 video drivers; we had a mix of 32-bit assembler and 16-bit C code in a 16-bit driver being called by 32-bit applications through a 32-bit to 16-bit kludge layer and negotiating with the 32-bit 3D drivers for control of hardware, all for the sake of backwards compatibility. Only the switch to XP finally eliminated that abomination.

    So yes, I'm glad that Linux devs are willing to break things if it results in a better end result. Unfortunately of late they often seem to be breaking things that remove useful functionality that we've been used to for years (Unity, Gnome 3, Wayland, etc).

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