Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: ATI/Radeon newbie, help me select!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    6

    Default ATI/Radeon newbie, help me select!

    Hi,

    Ever since my usage life with Linux I was always using nvidia cards with the closed source driver. Things run fine, but now I'm itching to try an open-source driver instead and make a small upgrade on my current card (an 6600).

    I'm looking at an HD5450, which comes with passive cooling. So, how well would it work? What I'm basically interested is (@1680x1050 with a Core2Duo E8400 64bit/4G RAM):

    KMS
    suspend/resume
    video playback without tearing
    kwin effects

    Any real world experiences?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I have a 5450. It works perfectly. Does everything you ask for and more.

    What I did notice is that the colors of videos were garbled. I fixed that by switching from classic to gallium.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    4,987

    Default

    You might want to consider a 6450, because it's double the speed of a 5450, just on hw side.

    Whether it works well yet, can't say.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    55

    Default

    I've got a 5870 here, and can vouch for it.

    Please remember though that with Open Source ATI, git is often far ahead of stable/distrib packages.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    997

    Default

    Doesn't sound Linux-friendly at all. For all the discussion on here, there's no FAQ about it including git.

    Questions abound. E.g.:

    http://help.lockergnome.com/linux/ge...ict531363.html

    So, when someone googles, they come up with this mess:

    http://www.x.org/wiki/radeonBuildHowTo

    No wonder many Linux users get a Nvidia card. Who writes this stuff?

    Where's the support from ATI?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    5,411

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Panix View Post
    Doesn't sound Linux-friendly at all. For all the discussion on here, there's no FAQ about it including git.
    Questions abound. E.g.:
    http://help.lockergnome.com/linux/ge...ict531363.html
    So, when someone googles, they come up with this mess:
    http://www.x.org/wiki/radeonBuildHowTo
    No wonder many Linux users get a Nvidia card. Who writes this stuff?
    Where's the support from ATI?
    most of the people do not need that stutt thats because they put an distri cd into the pc and it just works.

    ubuntu 11.04 is shipping with version numbers of mesa and xserver you can only get an newer version if you use unstable/dev released or daily git builds...

    and if you wana have really new stuff without dev skills you put an xorg-edgers ppa in your system..

    yes there are stuff you really need handwork s3tc,fp-textures

    but this is not the problem in the future you also can use ppa's for that stuff to.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    821

    Default

    A 5450 is a good choice if your 3D needs are limited to desktop effects. In the upcoming Ubuntu 11.04 release it will have excellent out-of-the-box support. However, its 3D performance is probably not an upgrade from a 6600.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Toronto-ish
    Posts
    7,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Panix View Post
    Doesn't sound Linux-friendly at all. For all the discussion on here, there's no FAQ about it including git.

    Questions abound. E.g.:

    http://help.lockergnome.com/linux/ge...ict531363.html

    So, when someone googles, they come up with this mess:

    http://www.x.org/wiki/radeonBuildHowTo

    No wonder many Linux users get a Nvidia card. Who writes this stuff?

    Where's the support from ATI?
    Panix, the idea behind the open source drivers is that they can be included in the Linux distros rather than having to be built/downloaded/installed separately.

    The Linux distros pick up and integrate the latest open source drivers each time they create a new distro version. You only need to build the drivers yourself if you want "bleeding edge" features & HW support, ie code which has been developed upstream but not yet pulled into Linux distros.

    If you want to help with development/testing or try out the very latest code you can get prebuilt "bleeding edge" repositories for many distros, or you can build the code from git yourself, but most users just run with what the distro packagers have included.

    There is always a challenge with the very latest hardware - not just for GPUs but for most devices - because the "upstream => distro => user" path requires that code be released ~6 months *before* hardware launch in order to be available in common distros at launch time, and that doesn't happen very often today so new HW still relies on "bleeding edge" repositories and proprietary drivers a bit more than anyone would like.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    997

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Panix, the idea behind the open source drivers is that they can be included in the Linux distros rather than having to be built/downloaded/installed separately.

    The Linux distros pick up and integrate the latest open source drivers each time they create a new distro version. You only need to build the drivers yourself if you want "bleeding edge" features & HW support, ie code which has been developed upstream but not yet pulled into Linux distros.

    If you want to help with development/testing or try out the very latest code you can get prebuilt "bleeding edge" repositories for many distros, or you can build the code from git yourself, but most users just run with what the distro packagers have included.

    There is always a challenge with the very latest hardware - not just for GPUs but for most devices - because the "upstream => distro => user" path requires that code be released ~6 months *before* hardware launch in order to be available in common distros at launch time, and that doesn't happen very often today so new HW still relies on "bleeding edge" repositories and proprietary drivers a bit more than anyone would like.
    Ok, thanks with the info.

    What is the best/cheapest ATI card that is better or an upgrade over a GeForce 7950 GT?

    Does it matter if it's the HD 5xxx series compared to HD 6xxx? Min. gaming but good overall 2D/3D.

    I would try to participate with some bleeding edge stuff probably as I'll soon have an extra HDD. I'll be using VirtualBox with the new drive but I still have the current drive. I am open to experimenting with Debian and latest Ubuntu...maybe Fedora... whatever I can tackle...

    I'm delaying a purchase for two reasons: 1) used hardware bound to be more affordable and new releases will have current hardware go down in price - the theory... 2) don't need it yet :- )

    I was reading about xorg-edgers and git and it seemed for OSS, these are needed for most optimized performance.

    I am not sure if I trust the distros with OOTB OSS drivers esp. ATI and I believe I am safe in being cautious with such situations.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    5,411

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Panix View Post
    Ok, thanks with the info.
    What is the best/cheapest ATI card that is better or an upgrade over a GeForce 7950 GT?
    Does it matter if it's the HD 5xxx series compared to HD 6xxx? Min. gaming but good overall 2D/3D.
    I would try to participate with some bleeding edge stuff probably as I'll soon have an extra HDD. I'll be using VirtualBox with the new drive but I still have the current drive. I am open to experimenting with Debian and latest Ubuntu...maybe Fedora... whatever I can tackle...
    I'm delaying a purchase for two reasons: 1) used hardware bound to be more affordable and new releases will have current hardware go down in price - the theory... 2) don't need it yet :- )
    I was reading about xorg-edgers and git and it seemed for OSS, these are needed for most optimized performance.
    I am not sure if I trust the distros with OOTB OSS drivers esp. ATI and I believe I am safe in being cautious with such situations.
    in my point of view you can save the most money if you buy an Llano with 100watt tdp 4 cpu-cores and an hd65xx but you really should put fast ram into it ddr3-2200mhz and a lot of ram 32gb in 8gb modules

    why i'm thinking this is the best? i think this is the best per watt usage because gpu computing is faster than cpu computing and the vram limit strongly hurt but this system with 32gb ram do not have this kind of limit gpu computing also is very efficient if its not hittet by an limit.

    an 100 watt TDP LLano system does not have the fastest cpu and the system does not have the fastest GPU but its maybe the strongest system per watt usage and without limitations on openCL like "vram"

    i'm sure modern Server CPUs will have the same architecture like Llano/bobcat.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •