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Thread: Final Linux Benchmarks Of Project Dirndl

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by XorEaxEax View Post
    Well, if it's a compiler/compiler suite I don't see why the licence would matter since it doesn't affect the generated code.
    If it is a compiler suite then it may matter if their runtime library is also GPL licensed and they don't have a provision akin to the GCC runtime library exception.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb88 View Post
    Merely that it pushes away some of the BSD operating systems they are working to completely supplant GCC with PCC or LLVM which are both BSD licensed
    The only serious push I've seen is to replace GCC as the system compiler, and I doubt that this is suited for that role.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb88 View Post
    Merely that it pushes away some of the BSD operating systems they are working to completely supplant GCC with PCC or LLVM which are both BSD licensed
    Political rather than practical choice as I see it, GCC has powered the BSD's for ages.

    Quote Originally Posted by monraaf View Post
    If it is a compiler suite then it may matter if their runtime library is also GPL licensed and they don't have a provision akin to the GCC runtime library exception.
    Doubt that, since they just recently released their own libcxxrt runtime under the BSD licence.

  4. #24
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    Come on guys, after the hints Michael gave us, it isn't that hard to guess which company and what software is behind "Dirndl":

    • Intel is very open-source friendly.
    • Their full compiler suite costs about $1300.
    • The Intel Math-library is known to bring a huge performance boost on multi-core CPUs and multi-threaded programs.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    No, its a just stupid license that keeps lawyers employed.
    No, a it's very smart license that keeps dirty proprietary and bsd hands from GPL projects.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by glasen View Post
    Come on guys, after the hints Michael gave us, it isn't that hard to guess which company and what software is behind "Dirndl":

    • Intel is very open-source friendly.
    • Their full compiler suite costs about $1300.
    • The Intel Math-library is known to bring a huge performance boost on multi-core CPUs and multi-threaded programs.
    Read the article, please:

    Contrary to some reader thoughts, this is not an open-source announcement from Intel.

  7. #27
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    "Contrary to some reader thoughts, this is not an open-source announcement from Intel. "

    So this is obviously nothing comming from intel. After all Intel Math libs and their Compiler suite produces much less performance increase on AMD platforms.

    -saski

  8. #28
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    I think it's most likely EKOPath4, as others have speculated.

  9. #29
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    What about performance benefits on crappy hardware like Atom? Or even regular systems (something whose cpu doesn't cost more than a typical laptop)?

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by devius View Post
    What about performance benefits on crappy hardware like Atom? Or even regular systems (something whose cpu doesn't cost more than a typical laptop)?
    For low power/low end systems it wouldn't give much speed, however in mid range if only gpu has enough processing units it could quite well accelerate vector and matrix based calculations however those won't normally happen if you are using your notebook/desktop for standard office/internet/multimedia except gaming where it won't matter because games are already using the gpu acceleration.

    It will matter mostly for servers and computing workstations.

    Oh and btw - @Michael, if you have this dual quad-core opteron system, would you be that nice and check out if this new magic can speed up some mesa software rasterization on cpu's? Maybe it's a bit silly to do this but it would do a nice proof of concept if this can be used for accelerating some system specific tasks.

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