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Thread: A Plethora Of Linux Power Tests Are On The Way

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  1. #1
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    Default A Plethora Of Linux Power Tests Are On The Way

    Phoronix: A Plethora Of Linux Power Tests Are On The Way

    Nailing down the Linux kernel power regressions (see Linux Has Major Power Regression and Another Major Linux Power Regression Spotted) has made a big step forward this weekend. Not only to fix up these major kernel power regressions that are hitting many mobile Linux users, but to look further into the state of Linux power management is now possible and to closely analyze other areas of the Linux stack to find other areas for improvement...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTU3OA

  2. #2
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    Nice! if you can help solving the 2.6.38 power saga once and for all, you will always be remembered!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FunkyRider View Post
    Nice! if you can help solving the 2.6.38 power saga once and for all, you will always be remembered!
    +1
    I thought the same thing.

  4. #4
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    Heh, eagerly awaiting the LKML mail listing 10+ commits causing power regressions

    Since apparently nobody else is measuring this, I don't doubt that you'll find many more than just the mentioned two.

  5. #5
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    You correctly state that "major kernel power regressions that are hitting many mobile Linux users", however you proceed to measure the power draw on desktop systems. Whether the results can be transfered to mobile setups is questionable and would have to be verified there anyway.

    I think the most meaningful results you get from directly measuring the voltage and current coming from a notebook battery. That way you avoid both the inefficiency in the power supply and the inefficiency in the charging logic, both of which don't really matter to mobile users but still skew the results.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chithanh View Post
    I think the most meaningful results you get from directly measuring the voltage and current coming from a notebook battery. That way you avoid both the inefficiency in the power supply and the inefficiency in the charging logic, both of which don't really matter to mobile users but still skew the results.
    ..or just unplug the battery and use one or two USB multimeters to measure voltage and amperage between the power adaptor and the laptop, otherwise you have to continually recharge the battery and can't take any measurements during that time . The measurement is way more accurate too, and an USB multimeter comes for less than 45 $.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chithanh View Post
    You correctly state that "major kernel power regressions that are hitting many mobile Linux users", however you proceed to measure the power draw on desktop systems. Whether the results can be transfered to mobile setups is questionable and would have to be verified there anyway.

    I think the most meaningful results you get from directly measuring the voltage and current coming from a notebook battery. That way you avoid both the inefficiency in the power supply and the inefficiency in the charging logic, both of which don't really matter to mobile users but still skew the results.
    for the purposes of the power usage benchmarking, I don't see a need for accurate measurements of the laptop sans the power supply.

    power draw will still increase from the wall when using the newer kernels that aren't regulating the system properly.

    for that matter, this has a lot of interest for servers as well as mobile. When you are running 400+ linux servers in a datacenter, you don't want to upgrade to something that will multiply your power usage draw.

    for a laptop it goes up a couple watts, for a datacenter it goes up a kilowatt or more...

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