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Thread: Burning Through Power: Linux Regressions Found

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  1. #1
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    Default Burning Through Power: Linux Regressions Found

    Phoronix: Burning Through Power: Linux Regressions Found

    For the multiple Linux kernel power regressions that I've talked about on Phoronix now for a number of weeks and have been affecting mobile Linux users en mass, I said I was looking for a better power measuring approach by using an AC power meter / UPS rather than a notebook battery to use in nailing these regressions. Using such a power meter would lead to a fully-automated process by the Phoronix Test Suite as no longer would I need to keep pulling the power plug from a laptop, could use much faster hardware, and allow for some other interesting possibilities. Well, last week I bought a power meter that plays with Linux. So now there's some news to share...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTYwMQ

  2. #2
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    Thank you, Michael!

  3. #3
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    Michael is a living legend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pejakm View Post
    Thank you, Michael!
    Thank the Phoronix Test Suite stack

  5. #5
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    While I would say you've done good work (you have, if you've done what you've said), you've been saying you've found some of the power-leaks for weeks now, so saying it won't make it to users until 3.1 is a little disheartening.

    If you disclosed these bugs individually as you found them rather than teasing and bundling them all up for the greatest publishing value, real users could be saving a lot of power right now. Chances are people might have had time to improve on some of your patches and get them into 3.0. Instead it's going to be another three+ month wait for the next stable kernel (assuming they're accepted in time).

    You're doing the right thing but you're doing it the wrong way.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliw View Post
    You're doing the right thing but you're doing it the wrong way.
    I think this is quite self-explanatory:

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Larabel
    This information isn't being released today as I'm waiting to hear back from the respective subsystem maintainer / the one that also signed-off on the patch in question (the name is no stranger to Phoronix) for any further details, but unfortunately he doesn't usually seem to work over the weekends. Additionally, hell yes, to maximize traffic and ad revenues off of this work due to the amount of time and resources I've spent tracking down these Linux kernel power bugs and other problems on top of my already maxed workload; no organization has yet stepped up to sponsor this continued work or any PTS-powered continuous integration on the kernel.
    Edit: Unless you care to sponsor Michaels work?

  7. #7
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    impressive work... hell i'm a desktop user and i don't care about power consuming but this way to find and fix bugs are the gold and best way!

    i'm sure Microsoft lose the battle only because of this kind of regression testing.

    *Trumps Up*

  8. #8
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    CyanogenMod (the popular Android ROM) has been using 2.6.37 again for weeks now since you disovered the power regression. They will be happy too :-)

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    This is great news. Thank you, Michael.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    i'm sure Microsoft lose the battle only because of this kind of regression testing.
    Microsoft's regression testing (and testing in general) is ridiculously well done compared to anything the Linux community has managed so far. They have entire teams of top-paid SDETs whose sole job is to design, build, and conduct tests with tools that are significantly more powerful than anything the FOSS community has available yet. There's a reason you don't see a lot of people complaining that something like Win7 SP1 screwed up their computers while it seems that every 6 months the Linux distros manage to fuck up something that worked in their previous release just fine despite hoards of testers (and their many eyes) using the distro's pre-release repos. MS has a very impressive and professional process; it's something to be emulated, not panned.

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