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Thread: Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

  1. #1
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    Default Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Phoronix: Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

    Next week Intel is set to roll out their much-anticipated "Sandy Bridge" CPUs during the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show. With these 32nm, LGA-1155 next-generation Intel Core processors will also come the Intel P67 Chipset on a whole selection of new motherboards at launch like the ECS P67H2-A2 and ASRock P67 Pro3. How well though will Intel's newest hardware play with Linux?

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=15579

  2. #2
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    The Intel Sandy Bridge support though should be all ironed out with a pleasant "out of the box" experience by the time of Ubuntu 11.04, Fedora 14, and other Q2'2011 Linux distributions are released.
    I think you mean Fedora 15.

  3. #3

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    One could have asked if Linux really supports currently available Intel graphics solution. And this depresses me. One active developer? Really? WTF?? Intel earns billions of dollars yearly and has just just one developer? WTF?

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    Damn......

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    Most of the changes are in the kernel and mesa. xf86-video-intel only does 2d acceleration and interface to X, basically.

    3d is in Mesa and in the kernel, modesetting is in the kernel, and Intel is doing quite a bit of work on those.

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    Intel's current high-end chipsets like the Intel X58, P55, and P58. On the motherboard side, the only issues you may experience are with the thermal/voltage/fan sensors not working with LM_Sensors and the kernel drivers at this point, but that is not a big issue to most consumers and the state of the hardware sensor support across most motherboards on Linux is still relatively sad.
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.

  7. #7
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    I bet the CPU part is going to work very well on Linux (even better than on Windows, in the long-term), but the graphics perfomance (on both Windows and Linux OS) will be as good as usual from Intel ...
    So, I think I'll still prefer to use a system with a fast processor (these Intel ones I think they won't let you down) and a discrete ATI/nVidia graphics card...

    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by energyman View Post
    wtf?

    In many years I never encountered a board where the sensor chip was not supported.
    Ran across quite a few over the years. Usually they eventually get implemented some time after introduction.

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    the worst I ever had to do was to add an identifier to a header file... the winbond or it chips are not so different at all...

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    Quote Originally Posted by energyman View Post
    the worst I ever had to do was to add an identifier to a header file... the winbond or it chips are not so different at all...
    Well just for example some motherboards like certain Asus motherboards utilize a virtual sensor device (ATK0110) support for it took quite a while.

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