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Thread: Apple Time Machine Come To Linux, Sort Of

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,133

    Default Apple Time Machine Come To Linux, Sort Of

    Phoronix: Apple Time Machine Come To Linux, Sort Of

    Apple Time Machine is a feature that was introduced in Mac OS X 10.5 nearly four years ago, which allows the automatic creation of incremental file back-ups that can be restored at a later date, either for the entire system or just an individual file. Mac OS X programs can also become Time Machine-aware themselves to take advantage of these incremental backups. Basic read-only support for better managing Apple Time Machine back-ups is now available to Linux users via a new virtual file-system aptly called the Time Machine File-System...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTY0NQ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    36

    Thumbs up About fuse and toys :)

    Hi,

    I wrote tmfs with no interest in performances. A friend of mine lost its macbook and could not read its Time Machine. So I wrote tmfs to help him recovering its data.

    The main goal is to provide a read only access to the data, performance is a non goal. So fuse is the best solution for this task.

    => going to update the README

    Thank you for the article!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Greece
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    3,798

    Default

    How did you manage to do this without support for directory hard links? (Linux lacks support for this.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Hi RealNC,

    You should read https://github.com/babali/tmfs/blob/...t_real_path.cc

    I used a simple trick, when I see a regular file with a size of 0, I suppose that it's a directory hardlink.
    So I check: I stat the path ${hfs_root}/.HFS+ Private Directory Data\r/dir_${nlink}/ and if it exists then I suppose it's a directory hardlink. If the file does not exists I know that it's not a directory hardlink.

    This may fail, but it's not common to have high nlink count on regular file.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RealNC View Post
    How did you manage to do this without support for directory hard links? (Linux lacks support for this.)
    Hi RealNC,

    You should read https://github.com/babali/tmfs/blob/...t_real_path.cc

    I used a simple trick, when I see a regular file with a size of 0, I suppose that it's a directory hardlink.
    So I check: I stat the path ${hfs_root}/.HFS+ Private Directory Data\r/dir_${nlink}/ and if it exists then I suppose it's a directory hardlink. If the file does not exists I know that it's not a directory hardlink.

    This may fail, but it's not common to have high nlink count on regular file.

    PS: I have some troubles with forums, I hope I didn't sent it many times....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Russe, Bulgaria
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    527

    Default

    @babali: Well done, sir!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by babali View Post
    I wrote tmfs with no interest in performances. A friend of mine lost its macbook and could not read its Time Machine. So I wrote tmfs to help him recovering its data.
    Amazing! What a noble use of software writing skills. If you want something done do it yourself.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,122

    Default

    ... How come I didn't get an article when I wrote dishpvrfs-fuse?
    Hmmmm?

    It allows reading of dishnetwork pvr disks.

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