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Thread: The first German-Turkish "Döner" Food Restaurant in the US:

  1. #51
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    OK, doner kebab-ish v0.2. No pics this time though.

    I'm starting to get the pitas figured out. Too thick and they won't puff evenly, too thin and they won't puff at all. If the dough is too dry they won't puff, and if it's too wet the thickness gets messed up and they don't puff evenly. Ask me how I know.

    Fortunately there is a pretty big zone where the pitas do puff up OK - make them about as thick as a typical pizza crust, dough dry enough to handle but then spray one side with water while the oven & pan are preheating then spray the other side with water right after putting the dough on the heated pan.

    I didn't have time to roll my own kebab this time either, but found some lamb/beef sausages and grilled them then sliced diagonally to get long-ish slices. Used lettuce and tomato this time, which really helped, along with raw onion and a few sausage slices.

    Using commercially made sausages brings the "snouts & jowls" content, which I'm sure is an important component of any fast food product

    Best sauce so far was a mix of yogurt, ranch dressing and scotch bonnet sauce, maybe 4 parts yogurt to 3 parts ranch dressing and 2 parts hot sauce. It was important to have sauce all through, not just on top. I tried spreading a bit of sauce on the inside of the pita before assembling but that seemed to weaken the pita and make the result kinda messy, but alternating filling & sauce a couple of times worked well. When the sauce distribution was right these graduated from "OK" to "pretty darned good".
    Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011 at 12:33 PM.

  2. #52
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    And, in the spirit of "building bridges" between tech and bbq forums, yes you can make a pretty decent Doner Kebab lookalike with bacon. The Doner Kebaconbab tastes more authentic than I would have expected. Goes nicely with Amsterdam Orange Weisse beer (hey, it's the first warm-ish day we've had in a while).

    Then again, it's hard to find any combination of bacon and wheat beer that *doesn't* go together.
    Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011 at 03:43 PM.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    now you need salad on it and mice and tomatoes and onions and a yogurt source and chilly on it !
    the "mice" here is a so called "bad friend" its sounds like "mais" but i mean Fresh-Corn here.

  4. #54
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    OK, so if you are talking about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize rather than http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse then I don't mind following your recipe to the letter.
    Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011 at 04:12 PM.

  5. #55
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  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Using commercially made sausages brings the "snouts & jowls" content, which I'm sure is an important component of any fast food product
    Best sauce so far was a mix of yogurt, ranch dressing and scotch bonnet sauce, maybe 4 parts yogurt to 3 parts ranch dressing and 2 parts hot sauce. It was important to have sauce all through, not just on top. I tried spreading a bit of sauce on the inside of the pita before assembling but that seemed to weaken the pita and make the result kinda messy, but alternating filling & sauce a couple of times worked well. When the sauce distribution was right these graduated from "OK" to "pretty darned good".
    2 authentic professional receipts:

    for the white one:
    250g Ayran
    200gTurkish or Greek Yoghurt
    125g Crčme fraiche
    Salt and pepper
    2 pieces of Garlic
    Lemon juice
    glutamate


    and for the red one:
    250 g Mayonnaise
    250 g Quark
    2 pieces of Garlic
    ˝ spoon paprika powder
    1 spoon OIL
    1 spon vinegar
    ˝ spoon Curry
    ˝ spoon Salz
    glutamate

  7. #57
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    Thanks !

    The red one doesn`t seem like it would be very red - just maybe a bit pink-ish or orange-ish from the paprika and curry.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Thanks !

    The red one doesn`t seem like it would be very red - just maybe a bit pink-ish or orange-ish from the paprika and curry.
    red one does not mean full red color it means different version with red spices.
    you can put more red spices in to color it up or you can cheat with "color" to paint it RED.
    you also can ad a little bit of tomato but not fresh one get dried tomato powder..

    but again.. its not tomato ketchup its a Döner dressing.

    you can put ketchup on a hamburger but not on a döner.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    OK, so if you are talking about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize rather than http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse then I don't mind following your recipe to the letter.
    ok thank you this Dyslexia just reflection the chaos in my brain..
    in my world (german native speaker) mice sound 100% like maize there is no difference..

    because M is sound like MAAAA and CE is the same as ZE
    I write what I hear thats my problem
    but the German alphabetic sounds different..

  10. #60
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    Good to know (about the sounds). I had to learn something similar when I was working in Korea. The core phoneme set there had one sound mid-way between our "R" and "L", and another sound mid-way between "B" and "P", so mixing up R/L and B/P when speaking English was very common since for a native speaker R and L are the same sound.

    After a while your brain starts to automatically do an on-the-fly "if hearing that sound as R doesn't make sense then try it with L instead" translation and everything suddenly starts to make sense, like sticking a babelfish in your ear. Of course this is easier with short sentences where the tree of possible interpretations is relatively small.

    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51;226160[url
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ejpw6k32Gs[/url]
    Yeah, that's pretty much what I was trying to avoid
    Last edited by bridgman; 09-03-2011 at 05:53 PM.

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