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Thread: Adobe Flash 11 Beta 2 Is More Stable, Faster On Linux

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    Default Adobe Flash 11 Beta 2 Is More Stable, Faster On Linux

    Phoronix: Adobe Flash 11 Beta 2 Is More Stable, Faster On Linux

    For those that missed it, this week Adobe released a second beta of their forthcoming Flash 11 platform for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows users. The first Adobe Flash 11 beta was christened by mainline 64-bit support after the earlier x86_64 Flash "Square" beta had fallen months out of date, but there's also other features to the 11.0 release...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTc4Mw

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    You probably should rephrase your titles. It looks like you are saying that the Linux client is faster and more stable than the Windows client. What you mean is that it has improved compared to previous versions.

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    early testing and the feedback of Phoronix readers has just yielded the Linux binary at least is a lot faster and more stable than last month's beta.
    Can you get an Archlinux test system too, please?
    Beause, no it isn't faster. It's still horrible as the beta 1. With horrible I mean, watching a low resolution video is not working fluently on an i5 480M@2,9GHz with HD 6550 on fglrx. Extreme tearing and large stutters. I think it renders everything in Software and draws everything to screen with no hardware acceleration whatsoever.

    Makes me wonder whether it loads some libraries dynamically on your Ubuntu or whatever you test it on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisXY View Post
    Can you get an Archlinux test system too, please?
    Beause, no it isn't faster. It's still horrible as the beta 1. With horrible I mean, watching a low resolution video is not working fluently on an i5 480M@2,9GHz with HD 6550 on fglrx. Extreme tearing and large stutters. I think it renders everything in Software and draws everything to screen with no hardware acceleration whatsoever.

    Makes me wonder whether it loads some libraries dynamically on your Ubuntu or whatever you test it on.
    He's probably testing it with VDPAU.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smitty3268 View Post
    He's probably testing it with VDPAU.
    Doesn't matter. VDPAU decoding, but still software rendering. At least on 32bit.


    flashplugin 11beta2





    flashplugin 10.3


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    Thanks gedgon. Maybe it is Flash's fault after all. Does anyone know how we can figure out what is (not) happening?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisXY View Post
    I think it renders everything in Software and draws everything to screen with no hardware acceleration whatsoever.
    That's not Flash's fault. Hardware accelerated video decoding is one thing (and in the absence of this your Core i5 480M@2,9GHz CPU should not have much problem decoding the video stream), while hardware accelerated rendering and drawing to screen is another thing entirely. If your Radeon HD 6550 is not providing hardware accelerated rendering then there may be a problem with the setup of your system. What is the output of glxinfo | grep render ? To run this command you may first need to install the mesa-utils package.

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    Quote Originally Posted by madbiologist View Post
    That's not Flash's fault. Hardware accelerated video decoding is one thing (and in the absence of this your Core i5 480M@2,9GHz CPU should not have much problem decoding the video stream), while hardware accelerated rendering and drawing to screen is another thing entirely. If your Radeon HD 6550 is not providing hardware accelerated rendering then there may be a problem with the setup of your system. What is the output of glxinfo | grep render ? To run this command you may first need to install the mesa-utils package.
    My system is fine:
    Code:
    chris@chrisl ~ % LIBGL_DEBUG=verbose glxinfo | grep render
    libGL: AtiGetClientDriverName: 8.87.5 fglrx (screen 0)
    libGL: OpenDriver: trying /usr/lib/xorg/modules/dri//fglrx_dri.so
    ukiDynamicMajor: found major device number 252
    ukiDynamicMajor: found major device number 252
    ukiOpenByBusid: Searching for BusID PCI:2:0:0
    ukiOpenDevice: node name is /dev/ati/card0
    ukiOpenDevice: open result is 6, (OK)
    ukiOpenByBusid: ukiOpenMinor returns 6
    ukiOpenByBusid: ukiGetBusid reports PCI:2:0:0
    direct rendering: Yes
    OpenGL renderer string: AMD Radeon HD 6500M/5600/5700 Series
        GL_NV_conditional_render, GL_NV_copy_depth_to_color, 
    chris@chrisl ~ %
    I use the 32 bit flash 10.3.181.35 in the meantime.
    Surprisingly,
    Code:
    EnableLinuxHWVideoDecode=1
    OverrideGPUValidation=1
    in /etc/adobe/mms.cfg has a rather big impact on CPU usage. The cpu usage on fullscreen video is very low (for flash), embedded in a window it's a bit higher, but for flash it is still rather good.

    Bottom line: 64 bit flash 11 is much, much, much worse than 32 bit flash 10 on my machine.

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    flash 10 disables composite features for fullscreen, flash 11 does not, did you notice that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by madbiologist View Post
    That's not Flash's fault.
    Actually, it is Flash's fault in many ways. The original Shockwave developers (before Adobe owned it) had some kind of issue with hardware acceleration of any kind, and intentionally chose not to architect their internals to work with it. Thanks to that, it's now 2011 and Flash is still having trouble making even the most basic use of hardware acceleration for anything. Their Stage3D work is only really even feasible because they're basically writing a whole second rendering framework for it that isn't based on the existing 2D framework. Nothing short of a massive rewrite of the Flash rendering internals (which is a good portion of all of Flash) can really fix their inability to properly use hardware accelerated rendering the ways that other apps can do trivially.

    There are SWF players used in the games industry (Flash is popular for building the 2D UIs and HUDs in otherwise high-end 3D games) that solve these problems. ScaleForm is the most popular by far, but I know of four others that have been written for specific games engines that use fully hardware-accelerated rendering that blows both ScaleForm and Adobe Flash out of the water in terms of performance. Unfortunately, nobody ever thinks to Open Source these things. There's the GPL Flash players, but they are still not as efficient as the game-specific ones (partly due to increased generality, partly because nobody in FOSS seems to have a clue how to properly use modern GPUs), and they're not going to help much in the professional markets due to their GPL-ness. (I believe LightSpark is LGPL, but that still means nobody can embed it in an app if they plan on ever supporting iOS, XBox, PS3, Wii/WiiU, DS/3DS, PSP/Vita, or any other OS/device that doesn't allow users to relink binaries. I know, blame the device makers, but for those of us that just want to ship awesome games to people who want to play awesome games, we have to avoid anything with the FSF stamp of full approval like the plague.)

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