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Thread: Longene: The Linux Kernel With Windows Support

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  1. #1
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    Default Longene: The Linux Kernel With Windows Support

    Phoronix: Longene: The Linux Kernel With Windows Support

    This morning after providing benchmarks of FreeBSD with Linux binary compatibility for gaming, which allows unaltered 32-bit Linux binaries to be executed seamlessly with the FreeBSD kernel (and in a rather fast manner), I was reminded on Twitter about another interesting project: Longene. Longene is a "Linux Unified Kernel" that attempts to implement Microsoft Windows APIs within the Linux kernel. In other words, Windows binary compatibility for the Linux kernel, including for Windows device drivers...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTg4NQ

  2. #2
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    Torvalds once expressed his endorsement of this stuff, as it enhances interoperability. However, the code is probably not remotely up to kernel standards.

  3. #3
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    I'm more interested in how they will resolve things like, making windows video drivers work with Xorg.
    I can think of ways to resolve it.. but they are all kind of nasty.

  4. #4
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    Kernel-level Windows compatibility? I shudder to think of the security risks.

  5. #5
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    Longene is not anything but ReactOS code merged into the Linux kernel...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    Longene is not anything but ReactOS code merged into the Linux kernel...
    You got some code snippets to prove it?
    Or to quote wikipedia CITATION NEEDED

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by insanemal View Post
    I'm more interested in how they will resolve things like, making windows video drivers work with Xorg.
    I can think of ways to resolve it.. but they are all kind of nasty.
    Nasty is an understatement

    Windows drivers use a far different interface model than Xorg drivers do, and the Windows driver interfaces are not fully documented so it will require a lot of reverse engineering to find out what undocumented Windows driver interface registers and calls that such drivers commonly use.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    Nasty is an understatement

    Windows drivers use a far different interface model than Xorg drivers do, and the Windows driver interfaces are not fully documented so it will require a lot of reverse engineering to find out what undocumented Windows driver interface registers and calls that such drivers commonly use.
    Where did you get that? The device driver interfaces are extensively documented in Windows. They employee people who do nothing but write documentation (66MB compressed).

    How do you think hardware manufacturers release drivers for every oddball device out there, by reverse-engineering the kernel?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    Nasty is an understatement

    Windows drivers use a far different interface model than Xorg drivers do, and the Windows driver interfaces are not fully documented so it will require a lot of reverse engineering to find out what undocumented Windows driver interface registers and calls that such drivers commonly use.

    You don't implement support for all drivers. Windows has userland drivers with very well documented interfaces for many things so you can implement support for those sorts of thing.

    example:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network..._Specification

    For video acceleration the ideal way from a current perspective would be implement trackers for DirectX and GDI. Then you composite Windows applications into a Wayland desktop. Just like how you are going to do it for your X applications. That way you can get native support for a multitude of APIs without having to support many multiple driver stacks.

    The alternative being trying to run X graphics acceleration driver + DRI graphics acceleration driver + Windows graphics acceleration driver + OpenCL acceleration driver + video codec acceleration driver etc etc.

  10. #10
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    They're using Wine. Check the screenshots in their application compatibility list.

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