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Thread: Project Indiana Desktop Looks Like...

  1. #1
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    Default Project Indiana Desktop Looks Like...

    Phoronix: Project Indiana Desktop Looks Like...

    While Project Indiana is still a few hours away from the development preview release, the first screenshot of it has emerged on the OpenSolaris Project Page For Indiana. This post-dated screenshot of the Project Indiana Developer Preview shows the GNOME 2.20-based desktop with a few windows.

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...item&px=NjE2Mg

  2. #2
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    Great I always disliked that nearly all distributions use custom themes where the default theme is nice most of the time. Fedora had used Clearlooks before, but the Fedora 8 theme is also nice. And Gnome 2.20 has an updated Clearlooks theme that really no distribution except a very few have used.

  3. #3
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    ok, kick my ass for this dumb question, but what is the use of Solaris .vs. Linux ??

    I'm an end-user, wanting an OS for multimedia, games and later video editing. I'm fine with my Gentoo Linux today as I can hear MP3, play games like Enemy territory or UT2k4 and do basically all the stuff for "home" appliances.

    I have the idea -perhaps wrong- that Solaris is a best OS for having a server with thin-clients connected. Especially Sun's thin clients.

    However, seeing all this eye-candy done for Solaris makes me thinks that probably, Sun's OS is not only reserved for that network usage.

    So, is Solaris compatible with Linux binaries ? What are the advantages of solaris ? What are the drawbacks ?

  4. #4
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    Solaris has its advantages and Linux has its advantages. I will not comment on that here, there are more intelligent and experienced people that can tell you about it.

    But one thing that is good is that the Solaris kernel is developed by one big company (Sun) and so the kernel is well optimized and stable. Furthermore, I don't think that there will be a lot of OpenSolaris respins, so all the work will go into OpenSolaris instead of thousands of distributions (I know about Belenix, Nexanta etc.).

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