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Thread: KDE Releases Plasma Active One User Experience

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    Default KDE Releases Plasma Active One User Experience

    Phoronix: KDE Releases Plasma Active One User Experience

    The KDE team has announced this Sunday the release of Plasma Active One, a touch-screen-focused tablet user experience...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTk4NA

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    And note that compared to gnome and ubuntu assholes (yes assholes, call me troll or anything, buts its true), this is inteface for tablets and its not forced on desktop users.

    MS, which seems to do same mistake will pay for it too, and I bet first thing most w8 users will do is to get metro out of their way.

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    We see this because KDE is more of a framework rather then just a desktop environment. It's flexible enough to be optimized for tablets , pc's , netbooks , phones , pretty much what ever form factor you feel like. KDE right now is by far the most advanced framework available for Linux. Not to mention Qt is better then Gtk. It just is. You know it I know it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxim Levitsky View Post
    And note that compared to gnome and ubuntu assholes (yes assholes, call me troll or anything, buts its true), this is inteface for tablets and its not forced on desktop users.
    I'm a desktop user and I find that Unity and Gnome Shell are awesome for keyboard + mouse usage, and I doubt that these two interfaces would work very well with touch screens as there are some things that require keyboard or mouse to operate. I never understood why everyone keeps saying that the new gnome/ubuntu desktops are for touchscreens. How the hell am I supposed to call the Unity launcher on a touchscreen? Maybe the big icons on a grid fooled you? That's the only thing that resembles a touchscreen interface. Really, I can open files and programs MUCH faster now, but then again I'm a CAD user so having to type stuff to make things work doesn't scare the crap out of me as it does to some people out there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lgstoian View Post
    It's flexible enough to be optimized for tablets , pc's , netbooks , phones , pretty much what ever form factor you feel like. KDE right now is by far the most advanced framework available for Linux.
    Too bad it's riddled with ridiculous little bugs that take away all the usability it potentially has. I'd really like to like KDE, but after using it for a few months I just can't. If you don't do anything with your computer it looks like an awesome Desktop Environment, but as soon as you try to get any real work done everything falls apart and Plasma implodes...

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    When is the last time you used KDE ? And I hope it wasn't on Kubuntu.

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    Quote Originally Posted by devius View Post
    Too bad it's riddled with ridiculous little bugs that take away all the usability it potentially has. I'd really like to like KDE, but after using it for a few months I just can't. If you don't do anything with your computer it looks like an awesome Desktop Environment, but as soon as you try to get any real work done everything falls apart and Plasma implodes...
    I really have to agree. KDE has many bugs. But its a living.
    I rather use a DE that is user friendly that DE that is bug free and forces things on me.

    To draw a parallel, Well windows has even less bugs that Gnome, and if you really want to its possible to shield yourself from most of its shortcomings (e.g most Linux programs have windows versions), yet we don't use it, because we want something free, really free. Gnome is free, but the attitude of developers and general inability to maintain fork of this scale, means that its GPL source is of little value.


    (Speaks a user that used Gnome for 4 years, but now really became sick of its developers attitude)

    In summary, I rather have bugs that I can fix, than features that I can't fix unless I fork major parts of the source, and have 0 chance anybody will use them due to install complexity.
    Last edited by Maxim Levitsky; 10-09-2011 at 05:52 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by devius View Post
    Too bad it's riddled with ridiculous little bugs that take away all the usability it potentially has. I'd really like to like KDE, but after using it for a few months I just can't. If you don't do anything with your computer it looks like an awesome Desktop Environment, but as soon as you try to get any real work done everything falls apart and Plasma implodes...
    Sadly i must agree. I'm not big fan of Plasma. It's resource hungry (on low end Nvidia card /w 256MiB RAM I'm often forced to kill plasma-desktop to free some pixmap cache video memory, when working with lots of windows), CPU intensive and lately (KDE 4.7.X) very buggy (task manager, folder view, notifications (since forever) plasmoids).

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    Quote Originally Posted by lgstoian View Post
    When is the last time you used KDE ? And I hope it wasn't on Kubuntu.
    I never even touched kubuntu. If I was going to use KDE then it had to be with a real KDE distro, so most of my experience came from openSUSE (11.2-11.4) and Arch. On OpenSuse it was a little less broken. On Arch, the "pure" kde experience was really awful. I mean, at first it was wonderful and everything seemed to be working perfectly, but after a few months of updates stuff started to get broken. I filed lots of bug reports and some of them only now are beggining to get acknowledged as Confirmed, and a few seemed to have received fixes for 4.8, about 6 months after I last used KDE (and 10-14 months after they were filed). Well, 6 months is nothing compared to the 9 years of the most hated bug (until recently).
    The problem with KDE is that the devs don't seem to give a crap about their users. Just look at the list of most hated bugs, most often reported and most wanted features and you can clearly see that almost all of them aren't major showstoppers but all add up to make KDE look like an unpolished and buggy mess. Most are all small things that tarnish what could otherwise be a very complete and capable DE.

    @Maxim Levitsky I use linux because it is way more capable than windows. On windows you need to go out and find a program for everything because the OS by itself is useless. I also like the security and the ability to open almost all files and access almost all filesystems out there. Just the other day I downloaded a few SPC files (those are SPC700 sound files, commonly known as SNES music files) and of course in windows (on my cousin's PC) it was necessary to find a program that would read them. On Ubuntu? They worked out of the box on Totem. Also, most linux file managers are eons ahead of what can be found on Windows and MacOS. Dolphin in particular is the best file manager I've ever used.
    Last edited by devius; 10-09-2011 at 06:15 PM.

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    kde is for morons. take that moron!

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