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Thread: The Qt Project Is Now Live

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  1. #1
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    Default The Qt Project Is Now Live

    Phoronix: The Qt Project Is Now Live

    Nokia has announced this morning that the Qt Project is now live, which means as of today Qt will be governed as a "true open-source project."..

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTAwNDA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Default Work for Nokia and don't get paid

    Quote Originally Posted by http://qt-project.org/legal/QtContributionLicenseAgreement.pdf
    §3.1 […] Licensor hereby grants […] to Nokia a […] license to reproduce, adapt, translate, modify, and prepare derivative works of […] and distribute Licensor Contribution(s) and any derivative works thereof under license terms of Nokia’s choosing
    Just the same shit as OpenOffice under Oracle and Unity under Canonical: Nokia own all your Qt contributions. Nokia can make proprietary versions without the need to ever give anything back.

    Wondering when “LibreQt” will be announced…

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Awesomeness View Post
    Wondering when “LibreQt” will be announced…
    Who's planning to do so?

  4. #4

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    Phoronix

    Sadly I did not realize until now that Qt Developer Days is taking place in the best city in the world, otherwise I would have happily been there...
    Blah, blah... it seems you didn't saw much. That stupid "Speichelleckerei" is getting boring.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kraftman View Post
    Who's planning to do so?
    Don't know. Depends when contributors get fed up with working unpaid for Nokia. Took OpenOffice contributors several years to recognize that and to form LibreOffice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Default

    Hmm. Maybe some people familiar with QT can answer this question I have...

    I'm running / compiling KDE apps under Windows.. When running at 1920x1080 resolution, these apps eat up a lot of CPU usage when resizing the window and scrolling.. I checked GPU usage and it sits flatly at 0%.. I compared this to iTunes and it looks like iTunes is using maybe 10-20% of the GPU when doing similar tasks and is also much snappier and less choppy than the KDE equivalent apps under Windows...

    So I'm guessing that by default it's using "raster" or "native" as the -graphicssystem which is a QT command/operator (not application specific).. Is -graphicssystem opengl stable under Windows or is it still experimental? If I get a black window (no rendering) when I try to run a QT application with -graphicssystem opengl instead of the default raster/native for Windows.. Is this a QT bug or a bug with the KDE application? Is there anything special a QT application needs to do to support -graphicssystem opengl? And if so, is it platform-specific special things that need to be done? (As I'm pretty sure these same apps run in Linux with opengl acceleration no problem).

    The exact same KDE apps under Linux, make use of the GPU and have much much less CPU usage..

    Just need to know where to file the bug report.

    Bug report for KDE is already filled, but is that where it belongs?
    Last edited by Sidicas; 10-21-2011 at 11:38 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Default

    Awesomeness: Copyright assignment has been required to get patches to upstream Qt since.. forever. Remember that it was initially dual-licensed?

    Nokia paid a lot of money for the Qt license, they paid a lot of money to fund further development for Qt, they backed out from a lot of income and relinquished control when they decided to release Qt under the LGPL, and now they're completely opening up development, allowing other companies to partake in the decision where Qt development is heading. What they've done for Qt is incredible, and it's waaaay better than the pre-nokia situation.

    Of course they don't want to foot the bills, then give everything away for free. They want to retain the copyright to their code, and that can only be retained by either disallowing all community contributions, or by requiring copyright assignment. The latter option is better for everyone involved.

    Also, a developer wouldn't be "working for Nokia", they're "working for Qt" with Nokia getting a little extra to protect their investments. If someone needs Qt, doing so is a very sensible choice.


    Apparently, neither one of the big companies nor KDE people objected to the clause, so why would you?


    Oh, and btw, if you think that copyright assignment was the reason for founding libreoffice: no. It absolutely wasn't.

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