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Thread: FIOPS: A New Linux I/O Scheduler For Flash/SSDs

  1. #11
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    Oct 2010
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    I would hope that it'd choose the scheduler at mount time, if possible, for each device. I can't imagine it choosing a scheduler based on the mode (as in mean, median, mode) device type and users still having a good experience.

  2. #12

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    At least a simple rotating/flash device division can be done quite easily, possibly in a udev script. Look at /sys/block/device/queue/rotational, if 1 write "cfq" to .../scheduler, else "noop"/"fiops". Possibly "noop" when /sys/block/device/removable is 1, "fiops" for 0. No idea if any distribution implements something like that, but it's nothing the kernel has to do.

  3. #13
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    Dec 2010
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    I've always wondered if it would make sense to use SSDs as a new layer in the cache hierarchy rather than as an additional faster drive? e.g. hard disk -> SSD -> memory -> L3/L2/L1 caches -> registers.

  4. #14
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    Feb 2008
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    They are being used like that in many places, but you'd just be burning your ssd cells. Not funny when it dies in a month or two.

  5. #15
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    Sep 2007
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    This should also work for other flash-based media such as flash media in routers, USB sticks and mp3 players

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by damg View Post
    I've always wondered if it would make sense to use SSDs as a new layer in the cache hierarchy rather than as an additional faster drive? e.g. hard disk -> SSD -> memory -> L3/L2/L1 caches -> registers.
    Like a Seagate Momentum XT on steroids? That one uses the cache only for reading, so no fear of burning through all write cycles in a month, but you obviously lose speed advantages writing. And you get some acceleration for everything, but you can never be sure that something doesn't get evicted, while using a ssd as system drive will always benefit the data on it (and obviously do nothing for everything else).

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