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Thread: Raspberry Pi's Nonchalant Graphics Stack For Linux

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  1. #1
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    Default Raspberry Pi's Nonchalant Graphics Stack For Linux

    Phoronix: Raspberry Pi's Nonchalant Graphics Stack For Linux

    Many were talking yesterday about why the forthcoming $25/$35 Raspberry Pi system won't ship in kit form, but of more interest to Phoronix readers out of that blog post would be the details concerning their Linux graphics driver stack and what they will be supporting...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA1MTc

  2. #2
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    @Michael :

    Do you have any clue what OpeMAX stands for and how it's architecture looks ? Stop jumping to wrong conclusions and do your homework.

    OpenMAX is a common mutimedia interface and framework by the Khronos Group. This interface is used on almost every Android phone out there. It can provide a complete chain of components from media reading, decoding, encoding, presentation. In this world you'll not find VA-API, VDPAU or your loved Gallium3D. OpenMAX is quite more than just the simple decoding from VA-API, VDPAU, Gallium3D.
    OpenMAX IL is just the integration layer, which builds on the OpenMAX core components. The IL can come from the vendor or OSS projects, like lima or even xbmc.

    For everyone who is interested in what OpenMAX is take a look at : http://www.khronos.org/openmax/ to get the right informations.

    lg

    Ebsi

  3. #3
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    The problem with no open source 3d driver could be made easier solved by donating a bunch of raspberrypi to gallium3d programmers, at least it is cheap enough to be a hardware platform that most people can afford.

  4. #4
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    The only downsides are that the user-space libraries are closed-up and that the open-source kernel driver is not part of the mainline Linux kernel.
    Maybe the only downside, but for me a major showstopper.

    All devices I have, that need binary blobs, in any form whatsoever are a pain. a Big pain.

    All devices that I have that work with all opensource stuffs, 'just work'. Mostly anyway, but slowly and always improving.

  5. #5
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    Default This device is a victim of hype...

    Raspberry Pi has had about 3 stories a day show up on Slashdot for about the last year. The level of hype has outstripped the actual device. While it looks like a nice, low-power board that could be handy in many cases, the Raspberry Pi is not the pure-open source Windows/iPhone/Apple killer that the hype machine has portrayed.

    Frankly, my 3 year old Intel Core 2 notebook with boring HD4500 graphics is *more* open-source friendly than the Raspberry Pi is. Of course, my notebook doesn't fit on a USB stick, but it also comes with I/O, wireless networking, real storage, etc. that the Raspberry Pi lacks. Moral of the story: New devices are nice, but they often don't live up to the inflated expectations and hype that get dumped on them. Second Moral of the Story: Underpromise and Overdeliver instead of the other way around.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckula View Post
    Frankly, my 3 year old Intel Core 2 notebook with boring HD4500 graphics is *more* open-source friendly than the Raspberry Pi is.
    But your notebook does not cost $25 and is not a "handeld" device, which is what the Pi is all about.

  7. #7
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    I'm... not sure 'Nonchalant' was the word you were looking for.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by peppepz View Post
    But your notebook does not cost $25 and is not a "handeld" device, which is what the Pi is all about.
    Actually, to be useful the Raspberry Pi needs to be plugged into something else that likely isn't handheld like a monitor and keyboard, not to mention the fact that something needs to give it power (no batteries built in!). Sure you can hack on a battery-powered USB power supply and some type of portable I/O or something, but you very quickly leave the "handheld" aspect behind when it comes to actually using the device. Transporting the Raspberry Pi in a disconnected state is easier because its smaller, but it is much less useful than a smart phone when there is nothing to plug the device into.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckula View Post
    Raspberry Pi has had about 3 stories a day show up on Slashdot for about the last year. The level of hype has outstripped the actual device. While it looks like a nice, low-power board that could be handy in many cases, the Raspberry Pi is not the pure-open source Windows/iPhone/Apple killer that the hype machine has portrayed.

    Frankly, my 3 year old Intel Core 2 notebook with boring HD4500 graphics is *more* open-source friendly than the Raspberry Pi is. Of course, my notebook doesn't fit on a USB stick, but it also comes with I/O, wireless networking, real storage, etc. that the Raspberry Pi lacks. Moral of the story: New devices are nice, but they often don't live up to the inflated expectations and hype that get dumped on them. Second Moral of the Story: Underpromise and Overdeliver instead of the other way around.
    As has already been mentioned, different devices for different purposes. I'm hoping to get my hands on several RPi's for a few different purposes.
    1) If it can handle XBMC, it'll make a decent little HTPC able to play videos over the network, and totally hide-away when glued onto the back of a television. Don't need to have a whole lot more for that.
    2) Outside of the HTPC use, I can't see much need for open source graphics... or for that matter, ANY graphics at all. Plug a network cable onto it, a few USB connectors, maybe something plugged into its GPIO, etc. Just a nice little brain box for interfacing and controlling things, and no need to turn it off....

  10. #10
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    I had high hopes for this device. By the time these kits are actually released to the general public, its price probably won't even be competitive anymore. chuckula had a few good points..

    This is NOT a "handheld device". You still have to attach it to something that's much more expensive to get useful output from it.
    When all is said and done, used game consoles have more value. Plus they're more fun anyways.
    And if Raspberry PI isn't any more open. There's almost no point.

    Raspberry PI is on its way to becoming the Duke Nukem Forever of embedded devices.

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