Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Ubuntu 12.04 ARM Performance Becomes Very Compelling

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,193

    Default Ubuntu 12.04 ARM Performance Becomes Very Compelling

    Phoronix: Ubuntu 12.04 ARM Performance Becomes Very Compelling

    Last week I delivered benchmarks showing how Ubuntu 12.04 is ARM-ing up for better performance with ARM-based hardware and detailed some of the plans Canonical has for this architecture going forward. While those benchmarks last week illustrated some significant performance improvements with the Ubuntu 12.04 stack -- in large part due to the switch to hard floating-point support -- the gains are not over. In fact, there are already some striking improvements if using the Texas Instruments OMAP4460 SoC as found on the PandaBoard ES.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=17032

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,445

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Ubuntu 12.04 ARM Performance Becomes Very Compelling

    Last week I delivered benchmarks showing how Ubuntu 12.04 is ARM-ing up for better performance with ARM-based hardware and detailed some of the plans Canonical has for this architecture going forward. While those benchmarks last week illustrated some significant performance improvements with the Ubuntu 12.04 stack -- in large part due to the switch to hard floating-point support -- the gains are not over. In fact, there are already some striking improvements if using the Texas Instruments OMAP4460 SoC as found on the PandaBoard ES.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=17032

    Enabling the hotplug governor will allow cores to be completely powered off (if on separate power planes), and frequency scaling works a bit differently as well.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    245

    Default

    This is awesome. I'd like to see how Kubuntu and Ubuntu compare in terms of performance though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    ฿ 16LDJ6Hrd1oN3nCoFL7BypHSEYL84ca1JR
    Posts
    1,052

    Default

    I was wondering how the pandaboard all in all compared to a moderately modern laptop. In this case a first generation i5 (480M):
    http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...BY-1201286BY26

    Yes, I know that they are not meant to be in the same performance class. I wanted to see it anyway.
    Also, the benchmarks are not ideal since I was surfing / working while running it.
    Last edited by ChrisXY; 02-03-2012 at 04:46 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisXY View Post
    I was wondering how the pandaboard all in all compared to a moderately modern laptop. In this case a first generation i5 (480M):
    http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...BY-1201286BY26

    Yes, I know that they are not meant to be in the same performance class. I wanted to see it anyway.
    Also, the benchmarks are not ideal since I was surfing / working while running it.
    is there also a core2 8200 quad and dual tested (with an old DDR2 MB ?) in OB , that might have been a little closer ?.

    it would also be better if someone did a FULL TegraŽ 3 Quad-core CPU test with both this
    Ubuntu 12.04 and the latest and greatest
    The Linaro Kernel Tree https://wiki.linaro.org/WorkingGroups/Kernel/KernelTree
    , sure it would still loose compared to the i5 and even the i3 due to having a slower ram and subsystem on board right now if nothing else all being equal, but it is the best until A15 etc or at least a faster 1.6/8 gig dual A9 comes along, and Tegra3 prime does have NEON on board unlike the Tegra2 and is a current key device for linaro.

    i thought
    Michael was supposed to get a quad TegraŽ 3 prime in the post to test already, what happened there, didnt you follow it up
    Michael ?
    Last edited by popper; 02-03-2012 at 06:26 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    ฿ 16LDJ6Hrd1oN3nCoFL7BypHSEYL84ca1JR
    Posts
    1,052

    Default

    Well it's not about "losing".. It was obvious it would be much slower. But I wanted to see it in perspective.

    I think comparing it with a CULV would be maybe "fairer" on the x86 side...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    113

    Default

    Yes, looks like Ubuntu performance is becoming less broken on ARM thanks to the latest updates But there are still some tests where Ubuntu powered Pandaboard ES (OMAP4460, dual ARM Cortex-A9 1.2GHz) is significantly falling behind Gentoo powered Origenboard (Exynos4210, dual ARM Cortex-A9 1.2GHz).

    This link contains the results from the initial OMAP4460 benchmark article combined with the current results and also with the results from Exynos4210 (which had been posted in the initial article discussion thread). The latest and greatest OMAP4460 results are highlighted in order to make the comparison easier.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ssvb View Post
    Yes, looks like Ubuntu performance is becoming less broken on ARM thanks to the latest updates But there are still some tests where Ubuntu powered Pandaboard ES (OMAP4460, dual ARM Cortex-A9 1.2GHz) is significantly falling behind Gentoo powered Origenboard (Exynos4210, dual ARM Cortex-A9 1.2GHz).

    This link contains the results from the initial OMAP4460 benchmark article combined with the current results and also with the results from Exynos4210 (which had been posted in the initial article discussion thread). The latest and greatest OMAP4460 results are highlighted in order to make the comparison easier.

    i do find it a little odd though that the Exynos4210 didn't do even better as apparently its got an lp DDR3 interface at a top speed up to 6.4GB/s memory bandwidth, whereas the OMAP4460 has the older lpDDR2 interface lower than that, and it seems clear slower ram speed is what's really holding these initial SOC back more than anything


    still, given TI worked closely with ARM as the Advanced Lead Partner on the Cortex-A15’s development i guess their OMAP 5 A15 MPCore ​OMAP5432 – 2-channel DDR3 @532 MHz is just around the corner with a Higher bandwidth memory interface with up to 8.5 GB/s
    http://www.ti.com/pdfs/wtbu/SWCT010.pdf
    Last edited by popper; 02-06-2012 at 02:48 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Ubuntu on Beaglebone

    We've been using Ubuntu on the Beaglebone for our Ninja Block ( http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...d-with-the-web).
    We've found the performance of Ubuntu equal if not better than Angstrom Linux on the same hardware. The board runs as faster as my 3 year old laptop (insanely fast).
    Ubuntu beats Angstrom hands down on the number of packages available for the distro.

    Cheers,

    Marcus

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    18

    Default

    We added our board to this test... http://openbenchmarking.org/result/1...BY-1201286BY42. It was an original Panda (EA3) with a similar hardfp build from the first week of February. While some of the benchies are predictably 20% slower than the ES, it is interesting to note that some actually performed better. We will try and figure out why that is...

    Looking at cpufreq-info, we were running at 1 Ghz 99.84% of the time. It throttled down to 300Mhz for something but omap4temp stayed well within range.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •