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Thread: Sabayon 8 Is Now An "Extreme-Rolling" Release Distro

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazycheese View Post
    What are kernel/initram, xorg, gcc and coreutils are usefull for except running a server? You are running server on Arch?
    Excuse me but what are you talking about? Taking makes absolutely no fucking sense. But yes I'm running a laptop and home server on Arch.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by alcalde View Post
    Does anyone know what this actually means? I hope it doesn't mean that things are going to go from code release to package even faster, meaning less testing and more instability in Sabayon....
    From Sabayon.org
    "The first Extreme-Rolling Release distribution, with automated repository package version bumping, thanks to Entropy Matter ebuild tracker"

    ...So the way I understand this the repository packages are automatically bumped to the latest version as its released from upstream?
    Not totally sure if thats the safest way to go about rolling release....theres a difference between being bleeding-edge and hemorrhaging-out. Could be interesting though I suppose. It would take quite a bit though to deter me from Arch tbh.

  3. #13
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    Default stable and unstable "repos" in gentoo.

    Quote Originally Posted by crazycheese View Post
    What are kernel/initram, xorg, gcc and coreutils are usefull for except running a server? You are running server on Arch?
    You are misunderstanding "stable" and "unstable" in the gentoo world. Stable has gotten much much better in the last few years.

    [pre]
    #eix -e mplayer
    [I] media-video/mplayer
    Available versions: 1.0_rc4_p20110322-r1 (~)1.0_rc4_p20111215 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120105 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120109 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120128 **9999
    [/pre]

    Note the versions with (~) in front of them. These are the unstable versions. Versions with ** are masked ("Ultra-unstable"). So as you can see there is a stable and unstable

    so "media-video/mplayer-1.0_rc4_p20110322-r1" is in the "stable repository", the (~) ones are in the unstable repo, and -9999 is masked. Anyways, I like facts, so there has been some brake-age in the stable tree "recently", I think the most recent libpng version bump in stable caused some headaches.

    I'll reserve my own opinions on Sabayon and it's place/contributions in/to the community.


    Back on topic, It looks like Sabayon now just has a cron that emerge --sync's and then builds every new package, while building a binpkgs and serving them via http. It ought to be a bit trickier than that as there are some things you can't have installed at the same time, but in general.


    P.S. I've been running gentoo or unstable gentoo since the fall of 2003, both my main desktop and home server run it. So I'm not new to it.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cynyr View Post
    You are misunderstanding "stable" and "unstable" in the gentoo world. Stable has gotten much much better in the last few years.

    [pre]
    #eix -e mplayer
    [I] media-video/mplayer
    Available versions: 1.0_rc4_p20110322-r1 (~)1.0_rc4_p20111215 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120105 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120109 (~)1.0_rc4_p20120128 **9999
    [/pre]

    Note the versions with (~) in front of them. These are the unstable versions. Versions with ** are masked ("Ultra-unstable"). So as you can see there is a stable and unstable

    so "media-video/mplayer-1.0_rc4_p20110322-r1" is in the "stable repository", the (~) ones are in the unstable repo, and -9999 is masked. Anyways, I like facts, so there has been some brake-age in the stable tree "recently", I think the most recent libpng version bump in stable caused some headaches.
    No, I was speaking about Arch, specifically about Arch Stable (non-AUR). When I used Arch it constantly broke on near all packages in AUR, because they are by far not good tested (if at all), and they very often lack any correct dependency metadata. Means, every time you update - you need to go fishing. Another thing - there is no USE, so multiple packages exist using just DIFFERENT config flags. Which means Gentoo has hand over Arch anyday, except for Arch having no burocracy and every easy approach on development - so it envolved while Gentoo stayed. The only good solutions which evolved from Gentoo are Paludis/Exherbo and Calculate. Daniel is back, Ive seen his Funtoo version, but once it started to violate spirit of Gentoo, I stopped using it (grub not shipping with vanilla configuration files). Arch has hand over Gentoo only when pulling from Arch stable repo - but it promptly looses to Debian or to binary-released Gentoo. Where it does however differ is - lack of complexity, it tries to keep things simple - one of the lessons I learned from that is that many "simple" make the overall job complex. You either love it or hate it - I have no problem with Arch.

    About Gentoo, while I thank you for the info and explanation ... I run Gentoo for two years, so nothing new. Yes, libpng bump with lafix fun, later integrated into revdep which later was integrated into portage itself (preserved-rebuild). There were several issues in stable, but what is broken in Gentoo - can only be fixed from scratch, its in design and in organisation, and you cannot do things right from the start - so thats ok too.

    Maybe I overreacted - but just a bit; doing literally nothing, crying out loud how great it is, taking money and jumping in front of one of the best minds at Gentoo - calling out he should die because he just does not use the crappy sabayon. That tells a lot about sabayon itself.


    Quote Originally Posted by cynyr View Post
    Back on topic, It looks like Sabayon now just has a cron that emerge --sync's and then builds every new package, while building a binpkgs and serving them via http. It ought to be a bit trickier than that as there are some things you can't have installed at the same time, but in general.


    P.S. I've been running gentoo or unstable gentoo since the fall of 2003, both my main desktop and home server run it. So I'm not new to it.
    Thats what Calculate has been silently doing for 1 year already. It has profiles - from basic system to desktops, and all applications are periodically built as binaries and pushed into overlay. When upgrading you do binary upgrade - all extra that you put into your world, or if you use different USE, will be emerged, all already precompiled just merged. Difference? Pure Gentoo system, that you can break and glue as you see fit. 1st extra rolling release my a$$.

  5. #15
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    For what its worth, ignoring most of what has gone on before this post, Lxnay and myself are both Gentoo developers...

  6. #16
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    What's extreme in shipping KDE 4.7 in Feb '12?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bug77 View Post
    What's extreme in shipping KDE 4.7 in Feb '12?
    And Firefox 9?

    But I tried Sabayon 8 in a 512MB virtual machine, and unlike the last one or two versions, I was able to get it to install in VirtualBox without issues, so that's a major improvement. The update notification tool also seemed much smoother and well-behaved from what I remember. The package manager interface is now the "Entropy Store" vs. the last time I used it, and the interface seems generally improved, but there's still some odd behavior. For instance, select "search" by "name" and enter "truecrypt" and it finds a match. Select "search" by "name and description" and enter "truecrypt" and it returns no matches. I also wish the results employed more than one column - because it lists the package category, name and description all in one column (in different colors and font sizes), you can't just scan your eye down a column and see if a match was found.

    It had a reasonably good mix of programs pre-installed (no Clementine? I discovered Clementine thanks to Sabayon!). The default system settings and favorites also appeared sensible.

    All in all, this was the nicest version of Sabayon I've seen yet, and felt more polished than when I tried and failed to switch to it from Windows in 2010, and there were far less bugs and boot speed was much improved. It's always been one of the more impressively-equipped live DVDs.

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