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Thread: AMD Publishes Open-Source HD 7000, Trinity Code

  1. #41
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    I remember reading something about the userspace bits also being there, but on a closer look, it seems to only affect the Trinity APUs, not the 7000 series.

    If that's the case, I'll wait a bit longer.

  2. #42
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    That's true. Ubuntu 12.10 will probably have open-source Radeon HD 7000 support but at the moment you're stuck with the vesa driver when running X.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertP View Post
    That's true. Ubuntu 12.10 will probably have open-source Radeon HD 7000 support but at the moment you're stuck with the vesa driver when running X.
    Actually, that's not a foregone conclusion. I wouldn't say it's flat out not going to happen, but I'd at least say that there should be significant doubt about whether 12.10 will have out of the box support for HD7000.

    The wait between the initial push of the kernel code (which is done, now, for HD7000) and the initial push of the Gallium3d code (which is yet to come) was 201 days for classic mesa, and an additional 21 (so, 222 days total) for Gallium3d. And that was just absolute bare bones -- this "bare bones" state is not stable/usable enough for Ubuntu to turn it on by default, mainly because it won't run something like Unity 3d with appreciable results, and they'd rather have people running Unity 2D stably than running Unity 3d that's crash-prone.

    Since Ubuntu likes to cut off pulling in kernel updates and 3d stack updates about 2 months into a release development cycle, that means the Gallium3d code for HD7000 would have to be in a usable state no later than about June or July. If it landed in August, due to Canonical's strict time-based release schedule and ostrich-like (head-in-sand) attitude towards upstream updates, I'm betting 99% chance they won't pull it. September, 100% guarantee they won't pull it. October, and hell would freeze over before they'd pull it.

    222 days from March 20, 2012 works out to be October 28, 2012, which is more or less going to be the week of release of Ubuntu 12.10. So if it hit that late, there's no WAY it'd ever be pulled into Ubuntu 12.10. 13.04 it is.

    But let's be charitable and say that, through some miracle, AMD managed to cut the time between the kernel push and the mesa push by a whopping 60%. 222 * 0.40 = 88 days. 88 days from March 20, 2012 works out to be June 16, 2012. Even I'm optimistic enough to say that, indeed, an initial push of Gallium3d on June 16, 2012 would probably be enough to stabilize the driver in June-July and get it into Ubuntu 12.10 and turned on by default by some miracle.

    But the question is, will AMD be able to cut their time to release by that much? Or will it sit behind closed doors for a period closer to the track record of 222 days for Evergreen? Every day that tick-tick-ticks by is slimming the chances that the G3D driver will land in distros being developed in 2012. And without the G3D bits, you have absolutely nothing.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by allquixotic View Post
    But let's be charitable and say that, through some miracle, AMD managed to cut the time between the kernel push and the mesa push by a whopping 60%. 222 * 0.40 = 88 days. 88 days from March 20, 2012 works out to be June 16, 2012. Even I'm optimistic enough to say that, indeed, an initial push of Gallium3d on June 16, 2012 would probably be enough to stabilize the driver in June-July and get it into Ubuntu 12.10 and turned on by default by some miracle.

    But the question is, will AMD be able to cut their time to release by that much? Or will it sit behind closed doors for a period closer to the track record of 222 days for Evergreen? Every day that tick-tick-ticks by is slimming the chances that the G3D driver will land in distros being developed in 2012. And without the G3D bits, you have absolutely nothing.
    Mesa push happened today (16 days ?). Is that soon enough ?

    The code is in a public branch on Alex's freedesktop.org repo until Tom comes back from vacation next week and we work out where the llvm bits should go -- a big chunk of the 114 KSLOC is LLVM back-end, including both common-across-all-AMD-GPU bits and SI-specific bits.
    Last edited by bridgman; 04-05-2012 at 01:07 PM.

  5. #45
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    Right, let's see if I can cover all the responses:

    • Hurrah! Congratulations AMD!
    • I'm really glad about this - I'm going to order a new card.
    • The release->driver support time is coming down very quickly
    • I already own a 7XXX - I can't believe it took this long!
    • Does it have UVD support?
    • Why don't you work on UVD?
    • AMD should just open up Catalyst
    • No open source EVERYTHING, right NOW means AMD don't even support linux - go to Nvidia!


    Have I missed anything out? *grin*

    Incidentally, I'm all of the first 3.

  6. #46
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    I guess the silent majority is like me, that is, "I'll consider a SI/Trinity when the FOSS support is at least as good as it is now for Evergreen".

  7. #47
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    Damn, I knew I'd forget something!

    Being a BSD user I'm a bit (!) behind the times when it comes to graphics cards, so I'd have to buy a non-cayman Northern Islands card - these being the most recent cards supported by UMS and the highest-spec cards that are in my price range.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by archibald View Post
    • Does it have UVD support?
    • Why don't you work on UVD?


    Have I missed anything out? *grin*.
    You forgot "Why are you wasting your time working on UVD ?"

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by curaga View Post
    I guess the silent majority is like me, that is, "I'll consider a SI/Trinity when the FOSS support is at least as good as it is now for Evergreen".
    Could also be, "I won't consider an SI/Trinity until other forum users have ran it successfully with FOSS"

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by bridgman View Post
    Mesa push happened today (16 days ?). Is that soon enough ?

    The code is in a public branch on Alex's freedesktop.org repo until Tom comes back from vacation next week and we work out where the llvm bits should go -- a big chunk of the 114 KSLOC is LLVM back-end, including both common-across-all-AMD-GPU bits and SI-specific bits.
    YES, that is most definitely soon enough. Thank you.

    You know what they say about pessimists, right? No matter what happens you'll be pleasantly surprised.

    I had a feeling that the SI code might land a tad sooner than 88 days, but I wouldn't have thought 16. Seriously though John, fantastic job, and congratulations to your team. I'm sure you haven't whipped up 114 KSLOC in 16 days and that it's been pretty far along in-house this entire time, but you didn't want to make any public promises in case there were some unforeseen delays (software is usually/always late ). So it's understandable that you didn't come right out and tell me back in March "hey dude, don't worry, it's coming out in like 2 weeks now". Because the moment you say something like that, Alex D. would stroll into your office and ask for another 3 months' time before publishing the code.

    Note that I tried very hard not to make my post offensive or derogatory towards AMD. How'd I do? I think I did a decent job. I was just laying out the facts as I could see them at the time, coupled with a healthy dose of doubt.

    But let me say that this turnaround time has significantly exceeded my expectations. Even if the driver is not at all usable today, the initial push is basically where the flood gates open -- we both know this. This is when the testing starts happening on all different chipsets; this is where power users, enthusiasts and developers start fixing application-specific bugs; this is where we start to polish the code. It's downright fantastic that this work is going to happen in April, rather than June or July, because that essentially means that our chances are very good for getting this work into distros a whole 6 months earlier. And for many people, that's about 15 to 25% of the total time that they'll be using this graphics card. That's VERY significant.

    Thanks. Hat's off to you and your team.

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