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Thread: Ubuntu Continues With Upstart, Releases v1.5

  1. #1
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    Default Ubuntu Continues With Upstart, Releases v1.5

    Phoronix: Ubuntu Continues With Upstart, Releases v1.5

    With Ubuntu remaining uninterested in systemd, the Upstart init system continues to be developed. Released today was Upstart 1.5 with a few new features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA3NTQ

  2. #2
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    Nice, upstart is the only init system that I've been able to use to replace my decade-old init shell scripts. Perhaps its development isn't particularly fast, but this also means that you don't have to study too much after updates just to keep your system working.

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    So everybody migrates to systemd - which has some really nice design ideas, and has proven to work really well - except for Ubuntu.
    Of course, they need some self-brewed init subsystem to load their self-brewed desktop environment.

    I wonder what component they will replace next

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    Quote Originally Posted by Linuxhippy View Post
    So everybody migrates to systemd - which has some really nice design ideas, and has proven to work really well - except for Ubuntu.
    Of course, they need some self-brewed init subsystem to load their self-brewed desktop environment.

    I wonder what component they will replace next
    To be fair, Ubuntu started Upstart before systemd, but otherwise I'd not disagree.
    Besides, systemd is really really nice. Great docs and tools and is seemingly pretty much finished as far as development.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Linuxhippy View Post
    So everybody migrates to systemd - which has some really nice design ideas, and has proven to work really well - except for Ubuntu.
    Of course, they need some self-brewed init subsystem to load their self-brewed desktop environment.

    I wonder what component they will replace next
    Ubuntu developed upstart before systemd. They do intend to migrate to systemd, but thought the change would have been too invasive for LTS. I believe 12.10 will use systemd.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linuxhippy View Post
    So everybody migrates to systemd - which has some really nice design ideas, and has proven to work really well - except for Ubuntu.
    Of course, they need some self-brewed init subsystem to load their self-brewed desktop environment.

    I wonder what component they will replace next
    To be fair, ubuntu developed upstart before systemd came around. Its not like they saw systemd and went "Fuck that, I'm making upstart!"

    I see no problem with them sticking with what they have, no need to waste time migrating to a whole new init system, when they've already put a lot of work into upstart and it works fine. I also see no problem with their "self-brewed" desktop environment. They have every right to have full control over ubuntu's interface. Ubuntu is a business with a plan, they don't want to be "just a popular linux distro"

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    They have every right to have full control over ubuntu's interface.
    Sure they have. Take a look at Android - it just uses the kernel and has a completly different userland.
    However - do you still think of it as linux?

    Ubuntu is a business with a plan, they don't want to be "just a popular linux distro"
    I wouldn't mind, if Ubuntu's Unity would be a properly maintained desktop environment project, but the sad truth is - it isn't, thats the root cause why its not even available with other distributions fragmenting the desktop space even more. Wouldn't it be so hard to transform Unity into a "real" project?
    This is an accusationof course, but for now it looks like Ubuntu isn't unhappy with the meintainance-situation of Unity, making it not practical for other distributions to include it.

    Combined with the lack of real upstream development (compare ubuntu to redhat, redhat guys contribute significant amount of code to the kernel, gcc, gtk ...) I have to admit I don't like their "buisness plan" very much, because, as with all buisinesses the focus seems to be on take rather than give.

    Well, but as it seems, thats buisness.

  8. #8

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    With Ubuntu remaining uninterested in systemd, the Upstart init system continues to be developed. Released today was Upstart 1.5 with a few new features.
    Who said that? They only said they will stick with upstart in 12.04. How do you know they won't siwtch to systemd for 12.10?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Linuxhippy View Post
    Sure they have. Take a look at Android - it just uses the kernel and has a completly different userland.
    However - do you still think of it as linux?


    I wouldn't mind, if Ubuntu's Unity would be a properly maintained desktop environment project, but the sad truth is - it isn't, thats the root cause why its not even available with other distributions fragmenting the desktop space even more. Wouldn't it be so hard to transform Unity into a "real" project?
    This is an accusationof course, but for now it looks like Ubuntu isn't unhappy with the meintainance-situation of Unity, making it not practical for other distributions to include it.

    Combined with the lack of real upstream development (compare ubuntu to redhat, redhat guys contribute significant amount of code to the kernel, gcc, gtk ...) I have to admit I don't like their "buisness plan" very much, because, as with all buisinesses the focus seems to be on take rather than give.

    Well, but as it seems, thats buisness.
    They did initially try to work with upstream with stuff like indicators and notifications, but gnome never accepted anything they offered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwat47 View Post
    They did initially try to work with upstream with stuff like indicators and notifications, but gnome never accepted anything they offered.
    Rightfully so. Canonical decided to not properly modify GTK itself but rather write a new library and only patch GTK to load the library which requires copyright assignment to Canonical for every contribution.
    It's typical Canonical “eat that or die” attitude. Canonical worked hard to ensure that as many people as possible within GNOME hate Canonical.

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