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Thread: Microsoft's Lessons Learned From Linux

  1. #1
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    Default Microsoft's Lessons Learned From Linux

    Phoronix: Microsoft's Lessons Learned From Linux

    Another session taking place next week at the 6th Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, besides Qualcomm allegedly wanting to kill all proprietary drivers, is two Microsoft engineers talking about their Linux driver development experiences...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA3OTA

  2. #2
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    Hehe, they learned you have to be responsive to "the community". Out of touch with their customers perhaps???

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    Microsoft just try to kill all baby penguins thatís for sure.

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    Whoa, Q. Holy crap!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    Whoa, Q. Holy crap!
    in my point of view this kernel driver is just a Trojan horse to kill Linux on the server market.

  6. #6
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    Nice job Q.!

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    So Microsoft learned that Linux has higher standards and is faster, cleaner and more efficient as a result. I wonder when they will begin to develop in the open. 2020?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    in my point of view this kernel driver is just a Trojan horse to kill Linux on the server market.
    I think Microsoft is the reluctant party this time... they were scratching their heads wondering why VMWare and Citrix were taking all of their virtualization customers and then realized that their few remaining ones were SCREAMING at them to get Linux performing at the required levels.

    Also, I bet when approaching new customers it must have come up during the evaluation phases (LOL I bet that went over well with Ballmer... when VMWare swoops in and checks all of the boxes Microsoft cannot deliver on for over half of their customer's requirements!)... by golly they must have felt like they were getting their asses kicked.
    Last edited by kazetsukai; 03-29-2012 at 05:22 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kazetsukai View Post
    I think Microsoft is the reluctant party this time... they were scratching their heads wondering why VMWare and Citrix were taking all of their virtualization customers and then realized that their few remaining ones were SCREAMING at them to get Linux performing at the required levels.

    Also, I bet when approaching new customers it must have come up during the evaluation phases (LOL I bet that went over well with Ballmer... when VMWare swoops in and checks all of the boxes Microsoft cannot deliver on for over half of their customer's requirements!)... by golly they must have felt like they were getting their asses kicked.
    you are right ... but this "kernel" driver is in fact for "microsoft" and not for linux.

    this means it would be better if the linux people don't work together with microsoft.

    but yes the linux people are just to "Friendly"

    microsoft and apple would never allow such a "inside-kernel-code" in the windows kernel or mac os kernel.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qaridarium View Post
    microsoft and apple would never allow such a "inside-kernel-code" in the windows kernel or mac os kernel.
    Say what?

    Oh, I get it -- so the digital signatures signed off by Microsoft on the VirtualBox and VMware drivers are, what? Hacks employed by fortune-500 companies (Oracle and VMware) to get around Microsoft restrictions?

    Come on now, Q, think. Microsoft intentionally allows its direct competitors to install kernel modules into the Windows kernel to do virtualization better than Microsoft's own product can. And they like this. From their point of view, they can't complain -- they're still getting the Windows licenses either way.

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