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Thread: OpenGL ES 3.0 Will Be Here This Summer

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jedibeeftrix View Post
    Based on OpenGL 3.2+ rather than 3.3, i wonder if this answers why beyond3D people are saying that DX10 style geometry shaders are not part of the spec (added to OpenGL in 3.3 i believe)?

    Why would they cut that feature out? over and above more complex shader operations, geometry shaders were one of the key functionality advancements that DX10 added over the old 9.x series......
    The only reason for the existence of geometry shaders is that high-end desktop GPUs were getting so fast that a single-core CPU and PCIe 1.0 bus couldn't feed it small geometry fast enough. So instead some of the geometry can be generated on the GPU itself using a geometry shader.

    This is a pretty useless feature on an API for embedded systems because their GPUs are not very good at handling high polygon counts, and because in relative terms the CPU and the bus to the GPU is very fast.

  2. #22
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    Soooo... I'm gleaning from this discussion that once the latest OpenGL ES is equal to the latest OpenGL, then OpenGL ES will be superior for desktop Linux as well as mobile. Also, it would allow OpenGL to finally surpass or meet DirectX in performance and power consumption. I'm guessing that it would also make developing the open source graphics drivers easier because they will not have to spend so much time worrying about backwords compatibility.

    Is this correct?

  3. #23
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    No, it is similar to 3.2 with some features missing.

    The OpenGL performance with nVidia is already on par with Direct3D, draw-calls are even a little bit faster. As I mentioned earlier, the OpenGL specifications can benefit from adopting some nVidia extensions such as bindless graphics, which theoretically can boost VBO performance up to 7.5x, which might improve the real world performance 50-100% on heavy VBO workloads.

  4. #24
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    So once we reach a point when, let's say OpenGL ES 6 has the features of OpenGL 6, it will still be missing certain features? Even if that were the case, couldn't a new OpenGL PC, (which would essentially be OpenGL ES, but with the missing features added back in) replace standard OpenGL in order to overcome OpenGL's shortcomings? In case you cannot tell, I'm referring to the shortcomings pointed out by people who say that we need to replace OpenGL with something better, LibreGL for instance, lol.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescience500 View Post
    So once we reach a point when, let's say OpenGL ES 6 has the features of OpenGL 6, it will still be missing certain features? Even if that were the case, couldn't a new OpenGL PC, (which would essentially be OpenGL ES, but with the missing features added back in) replace standard OpenGL in order to overcome OpenGL's shortcomings? In case you cannot tell, I'm referring to the shortcomings pointed out by people who say that we need to replace OpenGL with something better, LibreGL for instance, lol.
    No. Because the OpenGL API is busted at the very core of its API design.

    You cannot incrementally fix it. You need to toss it out and start over again. Gallium3D makes this relatively easy for the community to pull off, I might note. *nudge*

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    No. Because the OpenGL API is busted at the very core of its API design.

    You cannot incrementally fix it. You need to toss it out and start over again. Gallium3D makes this relatively easy for the community to pull off, I might note. *nudge*
    That I knew about OpenGL. I was under the impression that OpenGL ES was made almost form scratch though to be better optimized. I guess, from what you said, that's not the case though.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by elanthis View Post
    No. Because the OpenGL API is busted at the very core of its API design.

    You cannot incrementally fix it. You need to toss it out and start over again. Gallium3D makes this relatively easy for the community to pull off, I might note. *nudge*
    How is the OpenGL API supposedly busted? (and why is Direct3D not?)

    Gallium3D adds another abstraction level with overhead and feature limitations. The API(OpenGL/Direct3D) is supposed to be the abstraction between hardware and the application, adding another level is just simply stupid.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by efikkan View Post
    How is the OpenGL API supposedly busted? (and why is Direct3D not?)

    Gallium3D adds another abstraction level with overhead and feature limitations. The API(OpenGL/Direct3D) is supposed to be the abstraction between hardware and the application, adding another level is just simply stupid.
    IIRC, elanthis mentioned several times the limitations of OpenGL (being a state machine) concerning proper multithreading.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by efikkan View Post
    How is the OpenGL API supposedly busted? (and why is Direct3D not?)

    Gallium3D adds another abstraction level with overhead and feature limitations. The API(OpenGL/Direct3D) is supposed to be the abstraction between hardware and the application, adding another level is just simply stupid.
    And who is going to write the abstraction for each driver? You?

    Gallium is just common/helper stuff shared by drivers, like OpenGL state tracker and resource management. It won't be as fast as a custom-tailored implementation. But it is not like there are 200+ developers to work on one in the first place.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by efikkan View Post
    How is the OpenGL API supposedly busted? (and why is Direct3D not?)

    Gallium3D adds another abstraction level with overhead and feature limitations. The API(OpenGL/Direct3D) is supposed to be the abstraction between hardware and the application, adding another level is just simply stupid.
    Elanthis has mentioned before he wants a more object-oriented API. Think C++ instead of C.

    I agree that Gallium doesn't really do anything here, though - maybe it's a quick way to prototype changes, but ultimately nothing is ever going to get adopted unless NVidia and AMD bye in, and they've shown pretty conclusively I think that they aren't willing to change GL radically. I don't see how the chances of them adopting a completely new replacement could possibly be any better.

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