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Thread: Linux On The 2012 MacBook Air, MacBook Pro?

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    Default Linux On The 2012 MacBook Air, MacBook Pro?

    Phoronix: Linux On The 2012 MacBook Air, MacBook Pro?

    Since yesterday's keynote at the beginning of Apple's WWDC event where they announced several new MacBook products, I've received a number of emails asking about the Linux support for these 2012 MacBook Air models and the next-generation MacBook Pro...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTExODU

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    Michael,

    Get the new Retina MBP. There's nothing like it. It's quite possibly the best laptop in the world.

    Just don't forget about Linux once you have it (you'll be tempted).

    F

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    Since the announcement yesterday i am really curious to find out how the FOSS desktop environments perform in high resolution displays.

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    I've been using the Dell U2711 monitor with 2560x1440 native resolution on Linux for quite a while now---and it's simply awesome. So much screen real estate. I've never regretted the purchase, not even for a moment.

    In my opinion the existing desktops work fine (though I tend to keep my mouse acceleration pretty quick). That said, I don't use a bottom-panel taskbar; I tend to alt-tab or use the Expose-style switching. Gnome 3 is decent.

    Having such a high resolution screen in a laptop is exciting. I'm sorely tempted to try it out :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kayden View Post
    I've been using the Dell U2711 monitor with 2560x1440 native resolution on Linux for quite a while now---and it's simply awesome. So much screen real estate. I've never regretted the purchase, not even for a moment.

    In my opinion the existing desktops work fine (though I tend to keep my mouse acceleration pretty quick). That said, I don't use a bottom-panel taskbar; I tend to alt-tab or use the Expose-style switching. Gnome 3 is decent.

    Having such a high resolution screen in a laptop is exciting. I'm sorely tempted to try it out
    Yes but in the apple display you have approximately the same (higher to be exact) resolution in 15.4 inches instead of 27.

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    Linux + Apple Hardware == Huge Waste of money.

    I wouldn't mind somebody trying it to see what happens, but really it's a terrible idea to purchase a Macbook with the expectation that you are going to run Linux on it.

    Dual boot, fine. But get a Mac to primarily run OS X.

    Apple doesn't actually manufacture these things. Including the display. It's all contracted out to other companies which produce laptops and components to many other companies. Just wait until somebody starts advertising a Linux compatible device with similar resolution and you will get pretty much the same thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Yes but in the apple display you have approximately the same (higher to be exact) resolution in 15.4 inches instead of 27.
    The iMac retina displays are speculated to be:

    20" @ 2*1920x1080 = 3840x2160
    27" @ 2*2560x1440 = 5120x2880

    While I don't expect these displays will appear in the 2012 refresh (if there even is one), they are certainly welcome candidates for 2013. I'd pay an extra $1000 for a 27" retina display over a stock one. I doubt I'd pay more than $4000 for an iMac though, unless Apple bought me a lobster dinner and couple drinks first.

    F

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    Since the announcement yesterday i am really curious to find out how the FOSS desktop environments perform in high resolution displays.
    At least now a days we use some SVG icons I think.


    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Linux + Apple Hardware == Huge Waste of money.
    I wouldn't mind somebody trying it to see what happens, but really it's a terrible idea to purchase a Macbook with the expectation that you are going to run Linux on it.
    Dual boot, fine. But get a Mac to primarily run OS X.
    Linus Torvalds run Linux on his MacBook Air.

    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Apple doesn't actually manufacture these things. Including the display. It's all contracted out to other companies which produce laptops and components to many other companies. Just wait until somebody starts advertising a Linux compatible device with similar resolution and you will get pretty much the same thing.
    But other companies maybe doesn't have a unibody design, hi-ppi / high-resolution screen, Thunderbolt, etc.
    Other companies have laptops with a dozen stickers.
    Other companies have plastic low-quality laptops.


    Quote Originally Posted by Aleve Sicofante View Post
    I find it amazing nobody sees the elephant in the room: Linux desktops lack any sensible approach to resolution independence. The problem is not if graphics drivers will be able to cope with Macbook Pro's millions of pixels (of course they will), but if the framework will understand it's a 220 ppi display and behave accordingly, i.e., not display microscopic fonts and icons, but scale them correctly so they use all those extra pixels to show more detail.
    I think we use some SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) icons these days.
    Sadly we don't use SVG for the mouse pointer.
    Maybe with Wayland? I don't know. At least not with X.org though.


    Quote Originally Posted by 89c51 View Post
    I was under the impression that the linux desktop environments are resolution independent.
    Not the X.org mouse pointer.


    Quote Originally Posted by drag View Post
    Gnome desktop is more 'dpi independant' then OS X or Microsoft Windows is.

    All Apple does is just have two resolution modes that they use: 1x and 2x. So instead of tailoring the UI to one set of DPIs they just taylor it to 2 and then shoehorn in whatever looks better into their display.

    If people thinks that OS X can scale seemlessly between all sorts of different DPI monitors easier then Linux desktop can, they are drinking too much Apple flavored kool-aide.
    Doesn't OS X use a PostScript-based rendering system inherited from NeXTSTEP that is fully scalable?

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    One more point: many websites aren't really scalable (many use pixel measurements rather than DPI or "m"-widths). Most mobile browsers already use ugly hacks to make layouts look normal on small screens; I imagine Apple use more of the same for their Retina displays.

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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Linus Torvalds run Linux on his MacBook Air.
    If you are a kernel hacker then mucking around with your system to get it to work isn't going to be a big deal.

    How many patches are you going to write to get Linux to work half-way well on the new MacBook Pro? How many days of improving wifi drivers are you going to spend to get 5ghz wireless working?

    But other companies maybe doesn't have a unibody design, hi-ppi / high-resolution screen, Thunderbolt, etc.
    Wait a few months and other companies will come out with high density displays, too. It's the same thing as with Android vs iPhone.

    Apple just comes out first on these things because they have users that are willing to drop $2000 dollars on a 15 inch laptop.

    Other companies have laptops with a dozen stickers.
    Other companies have plastic low-quality laptops.
    And.. none of this means that Apple hardware will work better with Linux.

    Everything you said so far is pretty much completely irrelevant to anything I said.

    If you are going to go out and by a 600 dollar laptop from Dell expect it to actually BE plasticity and whatnot. If you want some brushed aluminium finish then be prepared to pay about the same price as a Apple system.

    Personally I don't want to go and drop 2500 dollars on a fast laptop that is going to cook my crotch or bake my arm just because I want a cool looking system.

    Doesn't OS X use a PostScript-based rendering system inherited from NeXTSTEP that is fully scalable?
    postscript-based = yes
    fully scalable = no.
    Not any more then Linux is.

    Compared to Windows XP it is very scalable, but that's isn't saying much since XP was hard coded to a single DPI. Windows Visa and 7 are scalable, too, but it still doesn't work very well because application designers don't typically take DPI changes into account.
    Last edited by drag; 06-13-2012 at 08:00 AM.

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